Four is Fun…

You probably all know how hard it is to lose a dog, even if they’ve lived a long and happy life.  It’s wrenching.  Dogs (and cats) are part of the family, they become woven into the fabric of our lives, of our homes, of our hearts.  For five years now, we’ve had either two or three dogs.

Last summer, we lost Blonde Bella.  Bella was half of a bonded pair that we adopted from Lab Rescue of LRCP almost six years ago.  We still have the “other half” of the bonded pair, Midnight Mia.  She’s eleven now, but still going strong.  She doesn’t seem eleven.  She doesn’t have much white on her muzzle, bounces around with the other dogs in typical Lab fashion.  She likes to steal food out of the dog food bins – knocking off the lids, nudging them aside, bumping them till they fall over.  She’s quite a clever girl.

We also have, as many of you know, a two-year-old Irish Water Spaniel, Tucker.  IWS’s (not to be confused with ROUS’s) are rowdy, happy, clowny, non-stop fun.

And yet, the house seemed empty after Bella crossed the Rainbow Bridge.  I was used to walking three dogs in between writing binges.  I’d write a while, walk a dog, write some more, walk a dog, write for another stretch then – you guessed it – walk a dog.  Now, I was in danger of gaining weight because, hey, one less dog to walk!

Writing is solitary and many who do it are introverts.  They don’t mind spending hour upon hour alone.

Me? Not so much.  I’m an off-the-charts extrovert.

I have to go have Starbucks every morning so I can talk to the barristas and any neighbors I happen to run into there.  Walking the dogs lets me run into MORE neighbors (or strangers who like dogs) and have a chat.

That means I get to feed my extrovert side in between writing time where the only people I talk to are those in my head.  Too much solitude and I actually CAN’T write.  I’ve learned that the need for the real humans must be met in order to keep on putting the fictional ones on the page.

Right after the New Year, (which, for us, came in with a few too many nasty surprises, alas!), we decided we needed a Happy 2018 present.  We needed something to keep us positive.

We decided to go back to the fab folks at Lab Rescue and get another dog.  With Mia at 11 and Tucker at 2, we thought it would be great for Tuck to have a slightly younger companion to romp with and that, in turn, would give Mia a break from his insistent, and near-constant demand to PLAY!

We thought we were so smart…we went to an adoption event.  So lovely!  But by the time we got there, 90% of the dogs were adopted.  Yay, Lab Rescue!  But Curses, Foiled Again! for us!  So we went on the Lab Rescue site and started talking to both our initial rescue coordinator from 5 years ago (yep, still coordinating!) and a new coordinator as well because we’d asked – foolish humans! – about a bonded pair that seemed perfect for us.

We hadn’t planned to adopt two more dogs.  Nope.  Just one.  But those two seemed like they’d fit right in.  Too bad they’d been adopted already.  Sigh.

BUT…said the coordinator, there was a new pair coming in.

They’d come from West Virginia.

Their owner had died and they were bereft….

We were totally smitten with those faces, and heartbroken over their story.  On one of the coldest days in January, we loaded our dogs and our boys into two cars and drove nearly 2 hours away to see this pair.  Our dogs played with them, our boys played with them.  We played with them.  Everyone decided it was a good fit, and home everyone came to their forever home with us.

There were a few bumps in the road – chewed boots, disappearing socks

, shredded toys – but a month in, I’ve now got four walkies on my writing days rather than three, and a veritable wolfpack of fun to keep me laughing when I’m here in the writing cave.

So, Mia, Daisy (a 2 y/o blonde darling), Dakota (a 4 y/o, huge, black, gentle giant) and Tucker have forever homes here at Chez Adams, and I may actually meet my New Years Resolution of going down another pant size, thanks to all those walkies!

Have you ever adopted a dog from a rescue group?

What about a shelter?

If you’ve bought from a breeder, what breed did you get?

If you’re thinking about a pet, please, please, please do NOT buy from pet 

stores – a friend just had a heartbreaking, nightmare of a situation, which reinforced the stereotype of puppy-mill-puppies being sickly.  PLEASE!!!  Go through a reputable breeder, or a reputable rescue group like Lab Rescue and you’ll get your Happily-Ever-After Hound!

Oh….and Happy New Year to all the Pens Paws and Claws readers!

(As you can see, Tucker believes ALL the dog beds are his for 2018!)

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A Parting Gift

A Parting Gift by Kathleen Kaska

One question most writers are asked is why we decided to become a writer. For me, that’s an easy one to answer. I became a writer because I wanted to prove I could do it. Another question, but one not so easy for me to answer is, how I got started.

I’d contemplated writing a novel for a long time before I worked on it. I wasn’t sure if I could do it. I got the nudge I needed in the summer of 1990. I was a teacher and it was the first day of summer vacation. I came home excited to have a long hiatus from the classroom. When I walked in the door that Friday afternoon, my fifteen-year-old dog, Lito was listless. I could tell he hadn’t eaten much that day and what he did eat, he couldn’t keep down. When his condition didn’t improve, I took him to the vet the next morning. The news was not good—kidney failure. Lito had a couple of weeks at the most. My wonderful vet sent me home with instructions on how to care for Lito and what signs to look for when the time came to help him cross the rainbow.

I was devastated. Lito had taught me unconditional love. I couldn’t image life without him. I was grateful that the situation occurred during the summer, and I could spend every last moment with him. He had always been there for me and it was my turn to be there for him. I decided I would not leave the house, except for a few quick trips to the grocery store and the neighborhood bookstore. At the bookstore, I didn’t even take time to peruse the bookstore shelves. I just walked in, grabbed a book off the bestseller table, and rushed home. During that last month with Lito, I sat by him and read one book after another. I’d always loved to read, but with my busy schedule I managed only one or two books a month. For someone who wants to become a writer, reading a lot is a must. During that difficult time, I probably read twenty books. Lito’s departing gift to me was to develop a passion for reading, which gave me the courage to write. That was twenty-seven years ago. I have nine published books and four more in the queue. The best thing is that, there’s not a day goes by that it don’t think of Lito and all the gifts he gave me.

Lito was a rescue dog. I found him at the pound in Waco, Texas. It was a difficult time in my life and I felt a pet was what I needed to help me through my troubles. When I walked by a pen full of jumping, squealing puppies, I noticed the tiniest one jumping the highest and squealing the loudest. He looked me straight in the eye as if to say, “Get me out of this mess!” I reached in and grabbed him and held him close. He immediately calmed down and I knew at this moment, things would be alright for both of us.

My latest book, Run Dog Run, the first in my new animal-rights mystery series, delves into the world of greyhound racing. A portion of the proceeds from book sales of Run Dog Run will be donated to The Greyhound [adoption organization] Project, Inc. If you read and enjoy my book, a review on Goodreads or Amazon will help spread the word.

Run Dog Run is Kathleen’s first mystery in the new Kate Caraway animal-rights series.

Synopsis:

Animal-rights activist Kate Caraway travels to Texas for much needed rest. But before she has a chance to unpack, her friend’s daughter, who is entangled in the ugly world of greyhound abuse, pleads for Kate’s assistance. On the case for only a few hours, Kate discovers a body, complicating the investigation by adding murder to the puzzle. Now, she’s in a race against time to find the killer before she becomes the next victim.

Kathleen Kaska also writes the awarding-winning Sydney Lockhart Mystery Series and the Classic Triviography Mystery Series. Kathleen is a member of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America. Although she spends most of her time on Fidaglo Island in Washington State, she’s a Texas gal. Except for an eighteen-month hiatus living in New York City after college, she lived in the Lone Star State continuously for fifty years. Since then Texas has been hit and miss—a little hit here and there, and a hell of a lot of miss. There was a time when she thought she would happily die in Austin, but things and weather—especially weather—changed that. When she gets homesick, she and her husband plug in the iPhone to Pandora and select Willie—as in Nelson, (I hope you don’t have to ask). Soon they are dancing the two-step, imagining they are at their favorite honky-tonk in Tokyo, Texas where the mayor is believed to be a dog. Who wouldn’t miss that?

Kathleen’s books are available through bookstores, Black Opal Books, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and her website.

http://www.kathleenkaska.com

http://www.blackopalbooks.com

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