Kitten Proofing: A Tough Job But Cat Owners Have to Do It

I’m constantly scouting my house for potential dangers for our two kittens, Harry and Hermione. They’re nearly six-months old and have been with us for three months since we adopted them from a shelter. In human years, they would probably be teenagers, but they act more like toddlers. They put everything in their mouths, so I try to keep the floors and carpets as spotless as possible. I check that there aren’t any exposed wires that they can chew on (no easy task in a household where computer devices are used daily). I block any area they can climb behind, under, or over where they might become stuck or hurt. I hide their toys when I’m not around if the toys have feathers or other dangerous parts they can ingest.

Kittens love to explore, but there are places in a house they shouldn’t go. Here’s Harry checking out my refrigerator.

It’s a tough task but kitten proofing a home is similar to childproofing one, something I haven’t done since my daughter was a baby 14 years ago. Like young children, kittens love to play and explore. They don’t understand the word “no,” or what will happen if they touch a hot or sharp object. And as in a recent close call with Harry and my husband’s mobility scooter, they can’t comprehend why it’s unsafe to walk behind something that’s moving.

Hermione on my husband’s motility scooter. Her brother Harry almost got hurt chasing it while it was moving.

Just like kids, kittens need to experience certain things to learn what’s safe and what isn’t, although you pray that they do so without getting harmed. A terrible story was posted on Facebook about a kitty that got into a food bin that automatically locked, sealing her in without air. My Harry was more fortunate when he nearly got stuck under the wheel of my husband’s mobility scooter and escaped with only a bad scare. His sister was present when it happened and heard his yowl. She got a scare, too. Now, when both kittens even catch a glimpse of my husband’s scooter, they run for the hills. He still has to watch that they aren’t behind him, but they are less likely to get in the way again.

Here are a few articles about kitten proofing for those with new fur babies:

http://www.meowcatrescue.org/resources/articles/13/kitten-proofing-your-home/

https://www.hillspet.com/cat-care/training/tips-for-kitten-proofing-your-home

https://www.thesprucepets.com/kitten-proof-your-home-552283

I’ve also featured a few videos with kitten and cat proofing tips on my character cat’s blog: https://wp.me/p7XcB0-y1

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3 Things to Do Before Bringing Home Your First Pet by Jessica Brody

Please welcome Jessica Brody to Pens, Paws, and Claws. She’s our guest blogger this weekend about bringing home your first pet.

Becoming a pet owner is one of the most rewarding things you can do. Dogs and cats are especially lovely creatures, providing endless companionship and unconditional love. Of course, caring for another life comes with its fair share of hefty responsibilities — there are several things that need to be done before you even bring them home! Check out these preparation tips so you can ensure the successful adoption and a happy life with your new friend.

 Research Pet Types Carefully

 Try not to fall for the first adorable pet that catches your eye. It’s important that your lifestyle meets the needs of the particular animal or breed you choose, so do your research before making a decision. To start, you’ll want to consider a few important questions.

        How much space do you have in your home and yard?

       Can you handle pet hair, unpleasant messes, and possible damage to your belongings?

       Do you have any allergies?

       How much time do you have to spend playing with and training a pet?

       What activities do you intend to do with them?

       Do you have the financial stability to support veterinary bills?

 Some dog breeds, like Shih Tzus, are better suited for apartment living and owners who work long hours. Others, like Dalmatians, love to exercise and are great companions for avid runners or hikers. In general, cats require less attention than dogs and tend to fit into various living situations, though they will still need space to roam around. If you just don’t have much room at all, aim for something in a cage or tank, like a fish.

 Get Your Home Ready

 Pets aren’t all fun and games — they’re a lot of work, too! Prepare your home ahead of time so you can keep up with the cleaning and avoid accidents. If you’re getting a cat, remember that litter boxes need to be cleaned on a daily basis. Consider investing in a self-cleaning litter box to make this task a little easier. Find the best options by checking out reviews on Cat Life Today.

 If you’re getting a puppy, look into comfortable crates and puppy pads to cut down on messy accidents during house training. No matter how careful you are, your pup is bound to have a few accidents inside. So, be prepared with cleaning products that prevent odors and stains from setting into your carpets or upholstery. You’ll also want to stock up on toys to keep your pet from unleashing their playful energy on your belongings. Dogster recommends pet-proofing your home with baby gates to keep your curious animals from exploring dangerous areas.

 Prepare a Gentle Welcome

Animals are very sensitive to change and can be uneasy in a new home for a few days. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to make your pet more comfortable. Cats are territorial and will benefit from a personal area, such as a laundry room or bathroom, where they can be alone now and again. Petfinder suggests creating a small enclosure in this area where your cat can hide away. You can purchase a covered cat bed for this or make your own hideaway by cutting a doorway out of a cardboard box.

 Rescue pets coming from the shelter may be even more nervous or scared in a new home. Give them space to explore your house and try to reduce the number of new people they meet during the first week or so. You’ll also want to stay close by to encourage your pet to bond with you and help them feel safe for their first days. Schedule your adoption on the weekend so you can spend two to three days with them. Additionally, start your obedience training from day one to establish mutual respect and dependability between you and your pet as soon as possible.

 Owning a pet for the first time may be a bit scary, but you’ll quickly see why the majority of people consider their pets members of the family. Although they require a lot of time and money, they pay us back by increasing our happiness, encouraging us to exercise, reducing our stress, and providing endless support throughout our lives.

About Jessica Brody

I am a dog lover and creator of OurBestFriends.pet. I created the site to offer a place for animal lovers to share their favorite pet photos and stories about their furry pals. I believe dogs are the best creatures on earth. I enjoy writing about and sharing photos of dogs (and other pets!) on my website.

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