Welcome, Sam Cheever!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Sam Cheever to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’m a USA Today and WSJ bestselling author of over 80 books. I write contemporary, cozy and paranormal mystery/suspense, and, I have 13 dogs. My husband and I rescue hard luck cases and senior pets. Our dogs are our family, our hobby, and our passion. As you can imagine, taking care of 13 dogs takes up a lot of our day. But we wouldn’t have it any other way!

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

Our close-nit little pack includes 2 Great Danes, 7 dachshunds, 2 cattle dog mixes, 1 pibl (she’s actually a bull dog / pitbull mix – so cute!), and 1 retriever mix. They’re all inside dogs. In fact, they’re all “inside on the bed and furniture” dogs. LOL Our youngest is around 4 years old and our oldest is close to 15 years old. We generally have 8 dogs on the bed with us every night, fortunately, most of the bigger dogs like to sleep on the floor and dog beds around us. My biggest challenges in life are finding room on the bed and not melting under the heat of 5-6 snuggling dachshunds. LOL

I write traits from my dogs into almost every book. Caphy, the Pitbull featured in my Country Cousin Mysteries is a sweet and fun mix of my pibl, Zoie and my daughter’s pibl, Willa. In Spunky Bumpkin, my latest Country Cousins mystery, which is part of the recently released Summer Snoops Unleashed collection, Caphy is joined by her new sister, LaLee the Siamese cat, and Spunky, a senior retriever whose owner has been accused of murder. The three pets help their owners solve the murder and find a killer!

My old guy, Poppie, is Rodney in my Silver Hills Cozy Mysteries; a senior dachshund with tons of personality and zero manners! In fact, my dachshunds make regular appearances in my books in some form or other, because they have such fun personalities.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m working on a brand-new series right now. My Enchanting Inquiries series features a young sorceress who is a Keeper of Magical Artifacts. Naida also works with a magically-talented cat, whose name is Mr. Wicked, and a frog named Mr. Slimy, who has a really big secret. The series is fun, irreverent, and filled with magical adventure. I’m having a lot of fun writing it!

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

If I put an animal into a book, it’s always as a main character. Any animal you add to a story has so much potential to add fun, challenge, and warm feelings that it’s a downright shame to waste that potential as a writer. You know the old adage about kids and pets in entertainment. You simply cannot beat them. But you can enjoy the heck out of them!

Why do you include animals in your writing?

See above! *grin* But really, aside from the fact that I’m passionate about them and try to never miss a chance to advocate for them, animals are just plain fun. They add so much to a story. They provide a richness of heart that only kids and animals can provide. They give your characters dimension. They can even move the story forward, as they often do in mysteries. An author can give an animal any number of fun and quirky traits that make the reader laugh, cry, and care about the story. They’re pure fiction gold.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

That depends on the time of day. Unlike my human children and my husband, my dogs simply won’t allow me to train them to respect my writing time, so anything goes. Once they’ve badgered us into feeding them in the morning, they’ll all settle down for a couple of hours of sleep. This is prime work time for us. Then somebody will decide it’s time for me to pay attention to them. But that’s good too because it forces me to get out of my chair for a while. I’ll usually go outside with them and walk around the yard while they bark at the hawks overhead, sniff out mice and other small things, (they even find the occasional mole. Which doesn’t work out well for the mole if I’m not there to rescue it!) Then we all traipse back inside and they settle down for a couple more hours before they start lobbying to be fed again. LOL It’s a never-ending, comfortable cycle.

To add intrigue to our days, every person, car, truck, or airplane that dares to pass by our home must get a loud talking to (I call it the canine chorus. You haven’t heard anything until you’ve heard 13 dogs bark and sing at the same time.) #:0) Every unsanctioned movement outside the house must be addressed. Then they’ll all settle down again until the next unplanned intrusion.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

When the kids were young we got a box turtle. That was a strange experience. I love turtles, but they’re kind of boring as pets. I’ve never written one into a book so that should tell you something. The poor thing would be sitting there blinking in chapter one and still sitting in the same spot blinking in chapter twenty-one. Not exactly riveting fiction. LOL

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

This is tough because the industry has changed so much since I started. My impulse is to say that I would have started writing mystery or paranormal adventure sooner. But at the time I broke in, romance was the biggest genre. So I wrote romance. And then I wrote sexy romance, which wasn’t really my thing. Writing this, I realize I should be feeling like I settled a little. But I really don’t feel that way. I enjoy romance, and it was fun to write, but I never exploded into the industry as a romance writer because the romance was always a small part of the stories I wove. I’m all about the mystery and the action first, and the romance just adds a nice edge to it all.

But taking that all away, I would have started writing to my real passion sooner. Also, I would have resisted going the sexy romance route. There’s nothing wrong with sexy romance, it’s just not where my passion is, and I think it kept me from finding my real audience sooner.

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why?

I read in bed at night. I rarely read during the day because there’s just too much to do. But I will listen to audiobooks while I’m in the car, cleaning, or cooking dinner.

I write almost exclusively at my desk. It’s comfortable and it’s easier for me to concentrate and work there. However, I’ll sometimes take my laptop outside and work. It’s a nice change of pace when I need one.

What is one lesson you learned about writing or publishing that you’d like to share?

Keep an open mind. With changes in technology, changes in the retail landscape, and shifting reader tastes, the publishing world is everchanging. Don’t fight the change. Embrace it. And look for ways to succeed within every new landscape.

About Sam:

USA Today and Wall Street Journal Bestselling Author Sam Cheever writes mystery and suspense, creating stories that draw you in and keep you eagerly turning pages. Known for writing great characters, snappy dialogue, and unique and exhilarating stories, Sam is the award-winning author of 80+ books.

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Welcome, Mary Adler!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Mary Adler to the blog.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

At the moment, we are blessed with only two dogs — Lily, our Rottweiler who had been abandoned in a garage after having birthed a litter of puppies, and Charley, our little terriorist mix, whose joy is contagious. Lily is older now, and her arthritis has put her in her purple chariot for longer walks which she loves.

At one point, our family included four Rottweilers, a pitty mix, and a few cats who came on their own to live with us despite all that canine presence.  Cyril, a beautiful long-haired cat once told the animal communicator (I live in California, after all) that he would like me to get him a hamster. Apparently, he had known one once and they used to have long philosophical discussions which he missed. (I did not fulfill his request.)

Other dogs have come and gone. We live in rural Sonoma county. Unfortunately, people think it is okay to abandon an unwanted animal “in the country”. We have picked dogs up from our dangerous roads and several dogs have found their way to our house. After we’ve made sure no one was looking for them, we’ve kept them until we found them good homes.  My heart goes out to people who are no longer able to care for a dog or cat and have to give them up to a shelter. I think they do not have the resources to find one of the many rescue organizations that will take dogs and find them new homes without the dog being subjected to the stress of the shelter, hopefully a no-kill shelter. I have rather strong feelings about people who dump an animal and leave it to fend for itself in a hostile environment where it is emotionally bewildered and in danger of starvation and injury. On our driver’s test they ask what the penalty is for abandoning an animal by a road. It is only a $1,000 fine. I wanted to write in a much harsher penalty.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

 I’ll tell you about two of my most engaging and unusual dogs. I have been blessed with amazing animals, but AndyPandy and Harley stand out.

I met AndyPandy while volunteering at a rescue event. The bald creature — my friend said he looked like an alien — was not a great candidate for adoption, so I decided to take him home, feed him good food, train him to be somewhat more manageable, and let his fur grow out. He was very high energy — substitute wild — not my kind of dog, so I believed I could foster him without getting attached to him.

It turned out AndyPandy was a thief. Not the usual steak-dragged-off-the-counter kind of thief, but a go-for-the-money kind. I discovered this when he joyfully brought me a wallet, sat in front of me, and waited for a reward. He had snagged it from a guest’s purse. I didn’t think much of it until it happened again. And then one day, I watched Andy quietly pull a wallet from a friend’s trouser pocket without our friend’s noticing. Andy was a pickpocket. I believe he had been part of a gang in the east bay and they had taught him to steal from peoples’ purses and shopping bags. He was so engaging and disarming his marks wouldn’t have suspected a thing. (I imagined Andy’s face on WANTED posters.) I gradually extinguished his stealing behavior by not rewarding him for it. He was exceptionally intelligent. Happily, he and I found the sport of Canine Scentwork where we channeled his considerable talents into just having fun. Oh, did I mention this little “foster” stole our hearts, too, and lived with us for fourteen years? And once his hair started to grow, it didn’t stop, allowing him to be a pitty mix disguised as an Australian Shepherd. I will miss him forever.

Harley was a very large, very sweet Rottweiler with a head like a bear. He liked to take people by the hand to show them things — often the basket where his treats were kept.  One day, he led me into the garden and showed me a nest of baby bunnies hidden in the perennials. He seemed quite paternal toward them. I had seen him playing “chase” with a rabbit. When she stopped, he stopped, keeping a safe distance between them, and then they were off again. They were friends, and she felt completely safe making her nest in his territory. And the beautiful soul that he was, he wanted to share it with me.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’ve always wanted to write a mystery and had been researching the book that became In the Shadow of Lies for a very long time. Much too long.  Finally, I gave myself a deadline — a significant birthday (I won’t specify which one) — and resolved to have a draft of the book by then or give up the idea that I could write a mystery.

I had written many essays, legal briefs, articles, speeches, and even poetry, but never fiction and was worried that I didn’t have the imagination to make up stories. I set the book in a place I love — Pt. Richmond, Ca — and a time I love — World War II. As I researched the time period and place, story ideas emerged from the social issues people were actually dealing with then: Restrictions on Italians who were thought of as the “enemy.” Racial tensions because of the large influx of black workers who migrated from the south to the east bay defense industry. A segregated military. The war. Italian Prisoners of War in San Francisco.

I also wanted to enjoy the company of a community of characters who were funny and kind and smart. My Italian family is gone now, so I created a fictional one in the book. (I must confess that Mrs. Forgione bears a strong resemblance to my grandmother.) When I sit down to write, it is as if I am going home.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

I can’t imagine writing a book without animals who take part in the story, just as I can’t imagine my life without them. Harley, a German shepherd, saves Oliver’s life on Guam and often steals the show. He represents the Marine K9 Corps who fought in the Pacific. During the war, many families volunteered their dogs to the Marines. Always Faithful by Captain William Putney is a wonderful book that tells about the bravery of the Corps and the devotion between the men and their dogs. As he said, “They gave their lives, so we might live.” Emma is a golden dog who looks like my Andy and travels the hills with Harmonica Man. The animals are definitely characters in their own right.

I suppose one of the lovely things about writing is that I can tell true stories about animals from my own life. For example, in the first book, a mother tells a true story of pinioned geese to explain isolation to her son, and Mrs. Forgione tells a story about swallows that reveals the character of a man.

For Shadowed by Death, I needed to understand the history of the war in Poland. I had grown up hearing derogatory stories about how foolish the Polish cavalry had been to try to fight invading German tanks on horseback.  In fact, the Polish cavalry’s brave maneuvers against the tanks confused the Germans and allowed many Polish soldiers to escape. There is also a wonderful new dog in the book who holds the clue to the mystery.

 Why do you include animals in your writing?

I can’t imagine a world without them and I believe the way people interact with animals reveals character. In part, I write about them to honor them, and in part, because they bring both joy and comfort to the human characters. For example, in In the Shadow of Lies, Oliver is on his way home from training at Camp  Le Jeune because of a death in the family.

“Harley inched closer and closer to me along the belly of the plane until he lay across my thighs and pinned me to the floor. When my hand found his ruff and tightened into a fist, he closed his eyes and pressed even harder against me, as if he wanted to absorb my pain.”

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I am writing the third Oliver Wright mystery which is set in Benicia and Point Richmond.

What are you reading now?

I am rereading the Martha Grimes Richard Jury series of mysteries. It is like visiting with old friends. Also, Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng.  My TBR pile includes the latest books from Anne Cleeves, David Rosenfelt, Julie Mulhern’s Country Club Murders Book 8, and DisasterInk, by Caimh McDonnell. I just finished what I am afraid is the last book by Peter Grainger in the DC Smith Investigation series. There are so many wonderful mystery series I can’t begin to list them all.

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

I wish I had known sooner that I could actually write a mystery. And how much fun it would be.

 What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

If you are a writer, the act of writing itself will give your life purpose whether you are published or not. Reach out to other writers and writing groups in person and online. You will be gratified by the support we give one another. While writing may be a solitary endeavor, you do not have to do it alone.

About Mary

Mary Adler escaped the university politics of “the ivory tower” for the much gentler world of World War 2 and the adventures of homicide detective Oliver Wright and his German shepherd, Harley. She lives with her family in Sebastopol, California, where she has created a garden habitat for birds and bees and butterflies—and other less desirable critters. Unintended consequences at work again.

She does canine scent work with her brilliant dogs—the brains of the team—and loves all things Italian, especially Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano and cannoli, not necessarily in that order.

Among the books she would be proud to have written are the Fred Vargas’s Commissioner Adamsberg mysteries, set in Paris; Maurizio de Giovanni’s Commissario Ricciardi mysteries, set in Naples; and Henning Mankell’s Kurt Wallander mysteries, set in Ystad. 

She reminds herself daily of the question poet Mary Oliver asks: “Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”

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Past & Present

Judy Penz Sheluk

In my previous posts on Pens, Paws and Claws, I’ve shared the stories of dogs from my past: Sandy, Einstein, Ranger and Copper. It should follow that in this post, then, that I write about Gibbs, the dog in my life at the present time. But here’s the thing: yesterday, the second book in my Marketville Mystery Series was released on Kindle and trade paperback. And it just so happens to be called Past & Present.

Now, I’ve checked with Gibbs, who spent a good many hours lying under my desk while I wrote the book, and he’s every bit as excited as I am. In fact, he insisted on me taking this time to tell you about it. (Of course, I had to give him an extra cookie. I also promised to share his story in my next post…with plenty of photos. That dog drives a hard bargain.)

Here’s the blurb:

Sometimes the past reaches out to the present…

It’s been thirteen months since Calamity (Callie) Barnstable inherited a house in Marketville under the condition that she search for the person who murdered her mother thirty years earlier. She solves the mystery, but what next? Unemployment? Another nine-to-five job in Toronto?

Callie decides to set down roots in Marketville, take the skills and knowledge she acquired over the past year, and start her own business: Past & Present Investigations.

It’s not long before Callie and her new business partner, best friend Chantelle Marchand, get their first client: a woman who wants to find out everything she can about her grandmother, Anneliese Prei, and how she came to a “bad end” in 1956. It sounds like a perfect first assignment. Except for one thing: Anneliese’s past winds its way into Callie’s present, and not in a manner anyone—least of all Callie—could have predicted.

Past & Present is available in trade paperback at all the usual suspects (ask your bookstore or library to order it in if they don’t have it), and on Kindle, where it is on for the introductory price of $2.99 (regular $5.99) until the end of the month. 

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Welcome, Alice Castle!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Alice Castle to the blog!

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I have two cats, Pushkin and Blackjack. Pushkin is a tortoiseshell and very highly strung (where does she get that from?) while Blackjack is midnight dark, apart from a tiny bowtie of white hairs on his chest, and very laid back, except when on the scent of a mouse. Pushkin, who is now twelve years old, is the model for the cat in my book, Magpie. Magpie lives with my amateur sleuth heroine, young widow Beth Haldane. I would say ‘belongs to’ Beth, but that, of course, would be ridiculous. Magpie just graces Beth with her presence and Beth is suitably thankful. Magpie is very aloof but every now and then something about her behavior will give Beth a crucial nudge in her investigations. She pops up in every story. Sometimes she just has a stroll-on part, sometimes she plays a more pivotal role.

What are you reading now?

At the moment I’m reading a book called The Mitford Murders by Jessica Fellowes. She is the niece of Julian Fellowes, who wrote the script for Downton Abbey. It’s a historical whodunit, involving the real-life Mitford sisters, who were the daughters of an eccentric peer, woven into a fictitious murder in 1919. It’s deftly done and very interesting. Nancy Mitford is 16 in the story. She grew up to be a wonderfully witty novelist.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m currently writing the fifth in my London Murder Mystery series, Revenge on the Rye. The plot revolves around the many people who walk their dogs on Peckham Rye, a famous park in south east London where you find everyone from famous artists to tramps, all loving their dogs but potentially harboring guilty and murderous secrets. It’s great fun to write and is going to be my sleuth, Beth’s most complicated and fascinating case to date, involving sinister goings-on in the art world and corruption in surprising places.

Who is your favorite author and why?

I hope it’s not cheating to say I have lots of favorite authors – the policeman who helps (or hinders) my amateur sleuth Beth in my stories is a huge fan of Golden Age crime fiction and so am I. I love Agatha Christie, D L Sayers, Margery Allingham and of course Raymond Chandler, who wrote about America but actually went to school in south east London, where my books are set. As far as modern day authors go, I really enjoy Janet Evanovich (I was very thrilled when one reviewer compared my books to hers) and MC Beaton (ditto). I was a huge fan of the late Sue Grafton. I also really enjoy Peter James’s books, as well as Peter Robinson’s. Claire Macintosh is a great writer too.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

We had a huge Airedale terrier. He was the grandson of a Crufts dog show champion and had a very fancy name, but we called him Chippy. Unfortunately, he had an unquenchable wanderlust and was always running away – he was very strong and once pulled me right over in park. He wasn’t interested in girl dogs but had a thing about boy Collies. He also really liked those hairy moon boots people wore in the 1970s – woe betide you if you had those on.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

I love my cats so much that I was really keen to have one in my books, as company for my single mum sleuth, who is often lonely (she is a widow) and sometimes needs a sounding board for her ideas that is sympathetic most of the time and won’t answer her back! In my latest novel, Revenge on the Rye, I’m writing about dogs, too and I’ve found that they immediately become proper three-dimensional characters, with bags of personality. They definitely pull on the lead while I’m writing and show me which way they want to go, which has been really fun.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

We all love our pets, don’t we? I think life would be much emptier without them and I think they add an extra dimension to a story as well. My cats are very much a part of my life and it seemed natural to include a cat in the life of my main character, too. Animals are interesting to write about on their own merits, but sometimes you can also use them to help out with the plot or characterization as well. A pet can point up something about another character, revealing a likeable or unlikeable person – or uncovering a vital clue at the right moment!

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

I’ve always loved the story Black Beauty by Anna Sewell. It’s a very sad tale about a horse and its owners. When I was young, there was a marvelous TV version that was a little less tragic in tone and it also had the best theme tune ever – check it out on YouTube. Whenever I hear it I’m plunged back into watching the show on our little black and white TV, lying on my stomach on our sitting room carpet.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I knew I was a writer when I was about four or five at infants’ school and a teacher asked me how I’d come up with a little bit of writing I did for a school project on leaves. I wasn’t sure how to answer so I said I’d read the words in a book. She said, ‘no, I think you made them up out of your own head, didn’t you?’ and I somewhat fearfully admitted I had. She said what I had written was really good and I suddenly realized this was something I could do. I do thank God for that teacher, and all teachers who take the time and trouble to encourage shy children.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

My cats love to be involved in the writing process. Blackjack is particularly keen to get in on the act and unless I light a scented candle to keep him away (I know, I’m heartless) he’d lie on my keyboard all day and stop me writing a word. On the other hand, Pushkin will often sit on the kitchen table where I work and stare at me crossly if I try and move away from the laptop – she keeps me to a strict schedule. Maybe she knows I’ve based my fictional cat Magpie on her and wants me to get on with it.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

I have TBR piles all over the house, and a virtual one on my Kindle, too. I still haven’t read Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch. I loved The Secret History but couldn’t get on with Tartt’s second novel and, despite all the amazing reviews for The Goldfinch, I haven’t had the courage to start it yet. I’ve also got Orhan Pamuk’s Snow in the pile, as well as The Miniaturist, which I accidentally watched on TV… There’s also The Standing Chandelier by Lionel Shriver that I have to read for my book group… I could go on and on! The ones I always get through first are the great murder mysteries, of course.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

Keep going! It’s not the easiest path – but if you actually are a writer, you won’t have any choice anyway.

About Alice Castle:

Before turning to crime, Alice Castle was a UK newspaper journalist for The Daily Express, The Times and The Daily Telegraph. Her first book, Hot Chocolate, set in Brussels and London, was a European hit and sold out in two weeks.

Death in Dulwich was published in September 2017 and has been a number one best-seller in the UK, US, Canada, France, Spain and Germany. A sequel, The Girl in the Gallery was published in December 2017 to critical acclaim. Calamity in Camberwell, the third book in the London Murder Mystery series, will be published this summer, with Homicide in Herne Hill due to follow in early 2019.  Alice is currently working on the fifth London Murder Mystery adventure. Once again, it will feature Beth Haldane and DI Harry York.

Alice is also a mummy blogger and book reviewer via her website: https://www.alicecastleauthor.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alicecastleauthor/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DDsDiary?lang=en

Links to buy books: http://www.MyBook.to/GirlintheGallery

http://www.myBook.to/1DeathinDulwich

http://www.myBook.to/HotChocolate

She lives in south London and is married with two children, two step-children and two cats.

 

 

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Welcome, Mollie Hunt!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Mollie Hunt to the blog!

Mollie Hunt & Tinkerbelle, Registered Pet Partners

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’m Mollie Hunt, a native Oregonian, and I write cat fiction including the Crazy Cat Lady cozy mystery series and some speculative cat fantasy sci-fi. I’m a member of the Cat Writers Association, Sisters in Crime, Willamette Writers, and the Oregon Writers Colony.

 Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

With me, it’s all about cats. Little, my 12-year-old black female has been with me since she was 2, and Tyler, my 15-year old tabby who acts like a kitten was adopted last year. Both came from the Oregon Humane Society where I volunteer.

Little is one of the Crazy Cat Lady series clowder. Tyler hasn’t been with me long enough to have a role, but I’m sure he will soon.

 Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Lynley Cannon, the not-quite-crazy cat lady hero of my series, has a varying number of cats in her care, but the number is usually around 8. In the latest book, “Cat Café” (out this fall) they are Little, Tinkerbelle, Dirty Harry, Solo, Violet, Big Red, Emilio, and Mab. Sometimes there are guests such as Cary Grant and Clark Gable, a pair of identical red Maine coons who worked as actor cats for a television pilot in “Cat Call”.

 What are you reading now?

“Waypoint Kangaroo” sci-fi by Curtis Chen; “Tea with Milk and Murder” cozy mystery by H.Y. Hanna; “Murder and Mendelssohn” cozy mystery by Kerry Greenwood.

 What writing projects are you currently working on?

I tend to work on several projects at once. Currently I’m in the final revisions for “Cat Café”; writing the first draft of a Crazy Cat Lady Christmas Novella called “Cat Noel”; and in the process of putting together a chapbook of cat poetry. I also have a cat fantasy sci-fi called “Cat Summer” out to an agent. (Wish me luck)

 Who is your favorite author and why?

How can anyone choose one from the millions of authors, current and past? I love Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series because her stories paint a colorful picture in my mind and her words are often poetry. This, along with a good mystery story, makes her books irresistible. Ditto Shirley Rousseau Murphy’s Joe Grey cat mystery series. Joe and his cohorts are magical cats with a backstory that stems from deep Celtic fantasy. The book I’ve reread the most throughout my life is “Titus Groan” by Mervyn Peake. It’s another case of painting a vivid picture in my mind, except this one is of a weird gothic castle in an alternate world.

 How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Though the cats in my stories don’t talk, they are endowed with those feline telepathic skills any cat person will instantly recognize, so they have been known to help solve the crime and save the day. Besides being sweet and funny, I employ them to educate people about cats. Through them, I can introduce all sorts of subjects from health to behavior to animal rights.

 Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

Thank you for that question. I love that you recognize the important roles working animals play in our society.

Tinkerbelle is a ten-year-old shelter stray who Lynley has trained as a registered therapy cat. Together they visit assisted living facilities and hospice patients as an ongoing thread in the series. Tinkerbelle is based on a real cat, though she is now retired.

 When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I came from a family that read a lot, and I wrote my first cat story in Mrs. Wilson’s fourth grade class. When I took up mystery writing several decades later, I knew it was my passion because when I write, time goes away and I’m lost in a world I love. Not to say writing isn’t work– it is, but where others would find it tedious, I leap from word to word with unspoiled wonder.

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

They mostly sleep, with a few sojourns across the keyboard just to keep me on my toes.

 What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

I have basically 3 TBR piles: Audio books that I listen to in my car; eBooks I read on my phone; real books. (There are more than one pile of real books.)

A few on the list are: “A Dirty Job” by Christopher Moore; “Lil Tom and the Pussy Foot Detective Agency” by Angela Crider Neary; “River City” by Doc Macomber; “Dressed to Kill” by Vicki Vass; Long Walks, Last Flights” by Ken Scholes.

 What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

The first million words are practice, and even the best writer needs a good editor.

 Thank you so much for having me. I enjoyed your choice of questions and hope your readers will like the answers.

 Mollie Hunt

Mollie’s Biography:

Native Oregonian Mollie Hunt has always had an affinity for cats, so it was a short step for her to become a cat writer. Mollie is the author of the Crazy Cat Lady cozy mystery series, including Cats’ Eyes, Copy Cats, Cat’s Paw, Cat Call, and Cat Café (coming 2018). The series features Portland native Lynley Cannon, a sixty-something cat shelter volunteer who finds more trouble than a cat in catnip. Mollie also published a non-cat mystery, Placid River Runs Deep, which delves into murder, obsession, and the challenge of chronic illness in bucolic southwest Washington. Two of her short cat stories have been published in anthologies.

 Mollie is a member of the Oregon Writers’ Colony, Sisters in Crime, Willamette Writers, and the Cat Writers’ Association. She won a CWA Muse Medallion for her blogpost series, “Life Stages”, and has received several CWA Certificates of Excellence for other cat-centric work. Mollie lives in Portland’s eclectic Hawthorne district with her husband and a varying number of cats. Like Lynley, she is a grateful shelter volunteer.

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Welcome, Edith Maxwell/Maddie Day!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Edith Maxwell/Maddie Day to the blog!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing. I’m a fourth-generation Californian who has now lived in Massachusetts longer than I lived in California. I’m a gardener and world traveler, the mother of two fine adult sons, and a full-time novelist writing cozy and historical mysteries and short stories north of Boston.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing? Yes! My tuxedo cat Birdy, who sadly died last summer, is the foundling kitty in the Country Store Mysteries. Always curious and desperate to get on the other side of any door, he was also a cuddler. Preston, our Norwegian Forest cat, is the farm cat in my Local Foods Mysteries. And Christabel is the kitchen cat in my historical Quaker Midwife Mysteries.

What are you reading now? I’m almost done with Aimee Hix’s debut mystery, What Doesn’t Kill You, and next up is Shari Randall’s Curses, Boiled Again, followed by Bruce Robert  Coffin’s second Detective Byron mystery and Kellye Garret’s Hollywood Homicide. There is never a shortage of books I want to read!

What writing projects are you currently working on? I’m polishing Strangled Eggs and Ham, my sixth Country Store Mystery (even though the fourth comes out only next week). Next up is my second Cozy Capers Book Group mystery, and then my fifth Quaker Midwife Mystery.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them. We had only two cats, Punky and Blondy. Punky ran away and Blondy died of what my mother called cat fever. My dad found he was allergic to cats and we never had any more pets beyond fish. Loved those neon tetras, though.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing? They are characters important to my protagonists, but they don’t talk or solve crimes. Even though I don’t know dogs very well, I do have a sweet husky-mix who belongs to the detective in the Local Foods Mysteries

Why do you include animals in your writing? I have animals in my life who mean a lot to me, and many others also do. I include animals for the same reason I include romance in my stories – it’s part of life.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why? I love Charlotte’s Web. We had the book on cassette tape (yes, I am that old) read by E.B. White himself, and my sons and I listened to it on many a car trip to Quebec and back when they were young. I love the intelligent Charlotte, the wicked Templeton, and dear Wilbur, as well as the human characters. The story tells of love and death and all the emotions in between, but it also has moments of humor.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know? I wrote lots of stories as a child, and at about age nine, my mother told me I was a good writer. I took that to heart! I fell away from fiction for thirty or forty years, but I kept my wordsmith chops honed by doing journalism, academic writing, more journalism, and technical writing. Then I realized my true love was making people up, killing off one or two, and restoring justice to a fictional community.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why? There are many, but the most likely to be realized first is a trip to Italy with my beau. Or maybe I should say seeing my firstborn get married – he and his sweetie are engaged and looking at wedding venues, so that’s definitely going to happen within a year or so!

What do your pets do when you are writing? Pretty much what they always do – lie around sleeping. Birdy loved to sneak into my office and sleep on my feet or on a corner of my desk, but the other two stay mostly downstairs.

Readers: What do your pets do when you’re trying to focus on a task? Do you stick to cats or dogs, or have both your home? I will give away a signed copy of the new book to one commenter, so be sure to include your email address!

Biscuits and Slashed Browns: For country-store owner Robbie Jordan, the Maple Syrup Festival is a sweet escape from late-winter in South Lick, Indiana—until murder saps the life out of the celebration. Robbie drops her maple-curry biscuits to crack the case before another victim is caught in a sticky and murderous trap.

Biography and Social Media Links:

Edith Maxwell is a 2017 Macavity and Agatha Award nominee and has also had several short stories nominated for an Agatha. She writes the historical Quaker Midwife Mysteries set in Amesbury, and the Local Foods Mysteries. Under the pseudonym Maddie Day she writes the Country Store Mysteries and the Cozy Capers Book Group Mysteries. Her award-winning short crime fiction has appeared in many juried anthologies, and she is honored to serve as President of Sisters in Crime New England and 2018 co-chair of New England Crime Bake.

A fourth-generation Californian and former tech writer, farmer, and doula, Maxwell now writes, cooks, gardens, and wastes time as a Facebook addict north of Boston with her beau and two cats. She blogs at WickedCozyAuthors.com, Killer Characters, and with the Midnight Ink authors.

My web site, edithmaxwell.com, includes information about all my writing, including my historical Quaker Midwife Mysteries, my other contemporary series, and my award-winning short stories. Please stop by, and sign up for my newsletter, too. You can also find me at the following links:

Facebook: Maddie Day and Edith Maxwell

Twitter: @edithmaxwell and @MaddieDayAuthor

Pinterest: EdithMaxwell

Instagram: EdithMaxwellAuthor

 

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