Welcome, J. L. Canfield!

Pens, Paws, and Claws welcomes J. L. Canfield.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Hello, I am originally from Jacksonville, Florida, was raised in Wilmington, North Carolina, have lived in upstate New York, (Clifton Park, a suburb north of Albany), Portsmouth, VA, Charlotte, NC, and now reside in the Richmond, VA area.

I am an award-winning writer of mysteries and women’s fiction.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I have two dogs, a Cavachon (female)and a Cavapoo (male). They are my only family and my muses. I did use them in a children’s story I wrote for a kid lit class I took. But they have not made an appearance yet in any work. Spoiler alert: That changes in book three of my mystery series. In the women’s fiction which will be released in May, a golden retriever named Tucker does play a role in a decision the female lead makes regarding the next step in her life.

What are you reading now?

I have been working my way through Bernhard Cornwell’s The Saxon Tales series, but I needed a break from that, so I am now reading Jacqueline Winspear’s In This Grave Hour.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I am finishing up book two in the detective mystery series starring Philip Samyn and have sketched out ideas for his next story. I am in the research and plotting phase of another women’s fiction which I will begin writing this summer, if not before.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Animals are a physical extension of humans and feelings. For me, my dogs got me through my divorce. My ex-husband and I fought over them. He wanted, in our settlement papers, to have the first right to them when I realized I wouldn’t be able to afford to keep them. I counter with a demand for puppy support in exchange for visitation twice a month. He dropped the issue. In the upcoming Icy Roads story, the young woman who is the central character is dealing with ever-changing problems in her marriage. She really wishes she had a dog both in her happy state and more so when her marriage falls apart.

In the third book of the Samyn mystery series, he too will be changing things in his life, and I have plans for an animal, not sure what species yet to appear in his world.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

My father shielded me from many childhood stories and books with animals. Usually, it was the ones where the animal dies (think Bambi, Sounder). I was a very tender-hearted child. I wouldn’t eat pork (he had a farm with pigs) or deer meat ( I often saw deers up close), and I would cry when their meat was in the house. So my favorite movie is Who Framed Roger Rabbit? I wanted to see it since Bob Hoskins was in it and I admired his acting. Also, it intrigued me this concept of live action sharing screen time with animation. I think it’s funny, well written, with gifted actors pulling this together.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

My father bought my mother for their anniversary precisely what she wanted, a white German Shepherd. It was a beautiful puppy which she named Rascal Von Stuckey. However, the dog really didn’t like her, and it really disliked my half-brothers. It bonded with me though. Maybe because I was the smallest in the house and its instinct to protect me when my father was away. I don’t know. What I do know is the dog stayed by me whenever I was home which was great since my brothers loved making me cry. When I was five or six, I contracted mumps on both sides of my face. Rascal stayed in my room. He would not go out unless I stood on the porch so he could see me. We also found out he would not take food from anyone except me. My father was a huge man who most people found intimidating. He stood over 6’ had a shaved head, and weighed around 250 or so. Since my mother’s teenage sons were afraid to feed him, my mother had managed to do so once when she got him on the porch and threw food out the window to him. My father was home and said he would take over my chore until I was well. My father’s hand spread from pinkie to thumb was about 12 inches. He opened Rascals food, leaned over to place it in his bowl and Rascal took my father’s hand and his food in his mouth. When my father managed to pull his hand out of the dog’s mouth, he came into my room and told me it didn’t matter that I was sick, I would have to feed the dog. Someone would get the food in the bowl, but I would have to put it down for Rascal.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I wrote my first play when I was six and in second grade. I was a ferocious reader, and the idea of creating stories fascinated me. I wanted to do it. Every year in elementary school I wrote a class play. In middle school, I worked on the school newspaper because I then wanted to be an investigative reporter thanks to the movie All The President’s Men. High School, I took creative writing and theatre classes. During college, I took writing classes but was told by my mother (who wasn’t paying for my education) not to major in writing because I would never make money at it. One of the BAs I received was in Broadcast Journalism. I considered it a compromise. It wasn’t until my divorce that I rediscovered my passion for writing. It helped me get through a four-year war with my ex. It gave me outlets for my emotions. It wasn’t until I received the PenCraft award that I could say the word author. It took a lifetime for me to think I could write and people would like it. All I ever knew was after I did a good day of writing, I walked away with the best high in the world.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

My Cavachon, Baroness Sassafrass Von Brong, and Cavapoo Sir Remington J. Wigglesby lay on their bed under my desk or on the daybed I have in my writing room. They are always near me ready to listen when I need to read a passage out loud.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

Think hard about it. Writing is not for those who dream of big dollar signs and fame. Most writers do not earn enough to live on, and that’s according to statistics. If you are a person who cannot take rejection or critical commentary of your work, then avoid being a writer. If you have difficulty in thinking up story ideas along with plots and twists, then think twice about writing.

Writing is painting pictures in readers heads with words. Like other artists, writers struggle for an audience, for being satisfied with their creations, with self-doubt, with acceptance, with selling their work, but those who know the only way they can achieve a personal sense of a euphoria that comes from crafting something from nothing are ones who were gifted with the skills needed to be a writer. If that describes you, then dive in. Just make sure you’re doing this for the right reasons, working to become something you love, not to live out a fantasy you have. Writing is tough, it’s harder than reading a book. But it is to me the best job in the world.

About Julie:

J.L.Canfield was born in Florida, raised in North Carolina, lived for a short time in upstate New York and now resides in the Richmond, VA area with her two dogs, Sassie and Remy. When not planted behind her laptop harvest words from her brain, she’s outside with a camera trying to capture the beauty she finds in nature. When possible she’s busy sleeping in the sun while baking on a beach.

Let’s Be Social:

Facebook

Twitter 

Web

LinkedIn

Medium

Amazon Book Link: What Hides Beneath

https://amzn.to/2GtBHIM 

http://www.blackrosewriting.com/literary/whathidesbeneath.

Icy Roads Preorder link:

http://www.blackrosewriting.com/literary/icyroads.

Please follow and like us: