Welcome Guest Author Edith Maxwell & An ARC Giveaway!

Judy Penz Sheluk reporting in…July 14th is my author rotation date for this multi-author blog, but as luck would have it, July 14th is my birthday (I won’t tell you which one) AND I’m going to be on vacation with very patchy internet (that’s my story and I’m sticking to it). Fortunately, my friend, award-winning author and the awesomely talented Edith Maxwell has agreed to fill in for me. Not only that…she’s offering an ARC (Advance Reader Copy) giveaway of her latest book, Death Over Easy, for one lucky commenter. Can I pick a guest author or what? Take it away, Edith! 

Where Did Birdy Come From? by Edith Maxwell

I’m delighted to be back on this lovely pet-centered blog. Thanks to Judy for inviting me! I’ve saved my last advance copy of Death Over Easy (release date July 31, 2018) for one commenter here today, and I’m hoping whoever wins it will love the read and be eager to post a positive review.

I want to introduce you to the foundling kitty in my Country Store Mysteries. He’s named Birdy and he waltzed into book one, Flipped for Murder, this way:

I fastened on my helmet and was about to throw a leg over the cycle when I heard a plaintive sound from the antique lilac a long-dead shopkeeper must have planted a century earlier. I heard the sound again. It was coming from under the bush, whose leaves had turned a winey deep red. I leaned the bike against the wall and squatted to look.

 A forlorn cat huddled there, its long-haired black coat lightened by a white face with one black eye patch. I’d never seen it before.

 Hey, kitty cat. Come here.” I scratched the ground in front of me. “It’s okay.”

 The cat made its way slowly toward me. But when I reached out to pet it, it retreated under the bush again, keeping its eyes on me with a hungry look. I stood, watching it.

 Whose kitty are you? And why are you afraid?” When I got no response, I unlocked the door and filled two small dishes, one with milk and one with water. I set them on the ground near the bush, made sure I locked up again, and set off down Main Street.

My protagonist Robbie Jordan names him Birdy because he chirps when he purrs. I named my real life rescue cat Birdy, whom I had for fourteen sweet years, for exactly that reason. Always curious, always playful, he never slowed down until he got very sick and died in two short weeks a year ago. I still miss his youthful energy around the house.

In the series, Birdy has a cat door and gets to go in and out at will during the day, although Robbie locks him into her apartment at the back of her country store restaurant, Pans ‘N Pancakes, at night. He’s not supposed to be in the restaurant for public health reasons, but when she’s doing prep after hours, she lets him browse and supervise. He, like the real Birdy, is fast and endlessly curious, and the other side of a closed door is always more interesting.

I’m delighted Kensington puts Birdy on the cover of every book. In the new book, he’s even in one of Robbie’s B&B rooms, which is strictly forbidden. Did I say he was sneaky? The artist’s rendition isn’t exactly true to his handsome looks, but it’s close.

I set several scenes in Death Over Easy at the Bill Monroe Music Festival grounds, which are in Beanblossom in southern Indiana. Yes, that’s the name of a real town, and it has its own covered bridge, just like in New England, where I live. Too bad a murder victim turns up in the bridge…

I hope you enjoy the read. I love writing this series and being back in the region where I lived for five happy years in my late twenties, and where my Maxwell ancestors settled two hundred years ago.

Readers: Which covered bridges have you traveled through? Have you had tuxedo cats, and if so, what are their names? Or just ask me a question – I promise I’ll answer.

About the author: Agatha- and Macavity-nominated author Edith Maxwell writes the Local Foods Mysteries, the historical Quaker Midwife Mysteries, and award-winning short crime fiction. As Maddie Day she writes the popular Country Store Mysteries and the new Cozy Capers Book Group Mysteries. She is president of Sisters in Crime New England and lives north of Boston with her beau and two elderly cats. She blogs at WickedCozyAuthors.com and KillerCharacters.com. Read about all her personalities and her work at edithmaxwell.com, and please find her on social media – she loves to talk to readers.

Here’s a glimpse of what you can expect from Death Over Easy: Restaurateur Robbie Jordan is ready for the boost in business a local bluegrass festival brings to South Lick, Indiana, but the beloved event strikes a sour note. The celebration is cut short when a performer is found choked to death by a banjo string. Now all the banjo players are featured in a different kind of lineup. To clear their names, Robbie must pair up with an unexpected partner to pick at the clues and find the plucky killer before he – or she – can conduct an encore performance.

FIND THE BOOK

Leave a comment for a chance to win an ARC of Death Over Easy! 

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Welcome, Mollie Hunt!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Mollie Hunt to the blog!

Mollie Hunt & Tinkerbelle, Registered Pet Partners

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’m Mollie Hunt, a native Oregonian, and I write cat fiction including the Crazy Cat Lady cozy mystery series and some speculative cat fantasy sci-fi. I’m a member of the Cat Writers Association, Sisters in Crime, Willamette Writers, and the Oregon Writers Colony.

 Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

With me, it’s all about cats. Little, my 12-year-old black female has been with me since she was 2, and Tyler, my 15-year old tabby who acts like a kitten was adopted last year. Both came from the Oregon Humane Society where I volunteer.

Little is one of the Crazy Cat Lady series clowder. Tyler hasn’t been with me long enough to have a role, but I’m sure he will soon.

 Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Lynley Cannon, the not-quite-crazy cat lady hero of my series, has a varying number of cats in her care, but the number is usually around 8. In the latest book, “Cat Café” (out this fall) they are Little, Tinkerbelle, Dirty Harry, Solo, Violet, Big Red, Emilio, and Mab. Sometimes there are guests such as Cary Grant and Clark Gable, a pair of identical red Maine coons who worked as actor cats for a television pilot in “Cat Call”.

 What are you reading now?

“Waypoint Kangaroo” sci-fi by Curtis Chen; “Tea with Milk and Murder” cozy mystery by H.Y. Hanna; “Murder and Mendelssohn” cozy mystery by Kerry Greenwood.

 What writing projects are you currently working on?

I tend to work on several projects at once. Currently I’m in the final revisions for “Cat Café”; writing the first draft of a Crazy Cat Lady Christmas Novella called “Cat Noel”; and in the process of putting together a chapbook of cat poetry. I also have a cat fantasy sci-fi called “Cat Summer” out to an agent. (Wish me luck)

 Who is your favorite author and why?

How can anyone choose one from the millions of authors, current and past? I love Louise Penny’s Inspector Gamache series because her stories paint a colorful picture in my mind and her words are often poetry. This, along with a good mystery story, makes her books irresistible. Ditto Shirley Rousseau Murphy’s Joe Grey cat mystery series. Joe and his cohorts are magical cats with a backstory that stems from deep Celtic fantasy. The book I’ve reread the most throughout my life is “Titus Groan” by Mervyn Peake. It’s another case of painting a vivid picture in my mind, except this one is of a weird gothic castle in an alternate world.

 How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Though the cats in my stories don’t talk, they are endowed with those feline telepathic skills any cat person will instantly recognize, so they have been known to help solve the crime and save the day. Besides being sweet and funny, I employ them to educate people about cats. Through them, I can introduce all sorts of subjects from health to behavior to animal rights.

 Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

Thank you for that question. I love that you recognize the important roles working animals play in our society.

Tinkerbelle is a ten-year-old shelter stray who Lynley has trained as a registered therapy cat. Together they visit assisted living facilities and hospice patients as an ongoing thread in the series. Tinkerbelle is based on a real cat, though she is now retired.

 When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I came from a family that read a lot, and I wrote my first cat story in Mrs. Wilson’s fourth grade class. When I took up mystery writing several decades later, I knew it was my passion because when I write, time goes away and I’m lost in a world I love. Not to say writing isn’t work– it is, but where others would find it tedious, I leap from word to word with unspoiled wonder.

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

They mostly sleep, with a few sojourns across the keyboard just to keep me on my toes.

 What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

I have basically 3 TBR piles: Audio books that I listen to in my car; eBooks I read on my phone; real books. (There are more than one pile of real books.)

A few on the list are: “A Dirty Job” by Christopher Moore; “Lil Tom and the Pussy Foot Detective Agency” by Angela Crider Neary; “River City” by Doc Macomber; “Dressed to Kill” by Vicki Vass; Long Walks, Last Flights” by Ken Scholes.

 What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

The first million words are practice, and even the best writer needs a good editor.

 Thank you so much for having me. I enjoyed your choice of questions and hope your readers will like the answers.

 Mollie Hunt

Mollie’s Biography:

Native Oregonian Mollie Hunt has always had an affinity for cats, so it was a short step for her to become a cat writer. Mollie is the author of the Crazy Cat Lady cozy mystery series, including Cats’ Eyes, Copy Cats, Cat’s Paw, Cat Call, and Cat Café (coming 2018). The series features Portland native Lynley Cannon, a sixty-something cat shelter volunteer who finds more trouble than a cat in catnip. Mollie also published a non-cat mystery, Placid River Runs Deep, which delves into murder, obsession, and the challenge of chronic illness in bucolic southwest Washington. Two of her short cat stories have been published in anthologies.

 Mollie is a member of the Oregon Writers’ Colony, Sisters in Crime, Willamette Writers, and the Cat Writers’ Association. She won a CWA Muse Medallion for her blogpost series, “Life Stages”, and has received several CWA Certificates of Excellence for other cat-centric work. Mollie lives in Portland’s eclectic Hawthorne district with her husband and a varying number of cats. Like Lynley, she is a grateful shelter volunteer.

 Let’s Be Social: 

Mollie’s Website

Mollie’s Amazon Page

Mollie’s Facebook Author Page

Mollie’s Newsletter

 

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