Meet Fiona Quinn and Little Bear

Pens, Paws, and Claws is pleased to welcome USA Today Bestselling Author, Fiona Quinn.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I am a USA Today Bestselling author, and I enjoy writing romantic suspense with a psychic twist.

In this article, however, I wanted to tell you about a “just for fun” mystery collection I’m writing with my dear friend, Tina Glasneck. We were at a brewery for a book signing together, sniffing beer fumes for hours, when we landed on an idea for a series called “The Badge Bunny Booze Mystery Collection” Each book begins with “If You See Kay…” and then a verb. So far, we’ve written “If You See Kay Run,” “If You See Kay Hide,” and coming out November 21, 2017, “If You See Kay Freeze.”

A badge bunny, if you’re unfamiliar with the term, is someone who enjoys sharing their physical attentions with cops. There’s a lot of tongue in cheek, double entendre cavorting. But it’s not graphically sexual. It’s really just a chance to giggle-snort (that word comes to us via a fan in Australia – and we whole heartedly agree!)

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

We don’t have a pet, but we do have a service dog for my daughter who has Type 1 diabetes. Diagnosed at age six, she was having a terrible time with seizures. Little Bear was on a team that were the first trained diabetes alert dogs in the United States. He “got the scent” when he was five-months old and my daughter went from 2-3 seizures a week to zero from that time on. He has worked with us for almost ten years now. He is a life saver and our family’s great miracle.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

In the Badge Bunny Booze Collection, BJ’s dog’s named Twinkles, and he is a recurring hero in the books.

From “If You See Kay Run”

Twinkles was my hundred-and-thirty pound, muscle bound, all-male Rottweiler. He got his name because he was a Christmas gift from my dad. I left him alone for two seconds. Two seconds! And he must have eaten a string of twinkling Christmas lights off my little table top tree, battery case and all. I figured this out the next day when he was moaning at the door. I put him on his leash and led him to the dog park, so he could do his business and meet some of the neighborhood dogs, maybe make a new friend or two. Everyone was super impressed when he finally made his poop, and it came out with flashing mini Christmas lights. At that point, he kind of got the name whether I liked it or not. So “Thor” went by the wayside, and Twinkles it was. It’s okay, he was comfortable in his manhood despite the ridiculous name.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I just released In Too Deep with the Murder and Mayhem project. It went to the top of the charts, hitting several bestselling lists including Amazon, iBook, Nook, USA Today and others. Another novel in that series (Strike Force) called “Instigator” is going up for preorder.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

In Badge Bunny Booze, Twinkles is one of the family. He is always around, getting into as much trouble as BJ and Kay do.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

 Our relationship with animals is indicative of character. There’s no better way to sew invisible seeds of doubt or acceptance than to have an animal react to that person. The animals react to the true nature of the person, not the veneer.

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

 In our newest novel If You See Kay Freeze, we have a new character, Justice Brown. Justice has a service rat.

“Justice reached up and tickled her pet rat under the chin. The rat was Justice’s service animal. It was sensitive to Justice’s well-being and would nibble on her earlobe before she had a seizure which gave her enough time to go lay down somewhere safe. Luckily, Justice’s seizures were pretty rare, but she knew my office had plenty of couch pillows to throw on the floor if need be. And even if she had to work the bar alone, Joe was in the back washing the dishes, and Nicodemus, her white rat, would protect her. I mean who would mess with someone with a protecto rat sitting on her chest?”

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

Once when Little Bear was alerting, I had to stop and help my child. All was well, and I went on with my day. Then Bear jumped up on my bed and put this t-shirt in front of me.

 

He looked up expectantly. You see I forgot to reward him, and we always give him a treat for his good work.

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

 Little Bear sleeps on the bed just outside of my office, then comes to get me for an alert if he thinks my daughter needs help.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

I’m a homeschooling mother. When my kids reached twelve-years-old, I asked them to start a business. A real business, with all the paperwork, tax numbers and all. when it was my son’s turn, he chose to be a lizard breeder. He bred bearded dragons and sold them to local pet shops. He did very well, but at one point we had fifty lizards and their accompanying food bins of cockroaches and crickets. My mantra at the time: “I love him. He’s learning a lot.”

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9 thoughts on “Meet Fiona Quinn and Little Bear”

  1. Hi Fiona,
    Wonderful to read about Bear and a great idea about having your kids design a business. My first magazine article was about a diabetic alert dog who signaled a twelve-year-old boy before he lost consciousness. I continue to write my novel series with service dogs.
    Yes. It is fun to add animals as charcters in our stories.

  2. “Someone who enjoys sharing their physical attentions with cops” – I did NOT know that! 😳

    How fabulous to have a “sensor” dog 🐶. My mutts are mere amateurs 🐾 🐾

    Sounds like a fabulous new series–we all need more humor.

  3. Thank you for sharing your story about Little Bear. I love reading about service animals. My dream is to work with the CNIB (Canadian National Institute for the blind) and host puppies that are going into the program or foster the older dogs when they retire. I live in an isolated areas so I don’t qualify, but if I ever move to a city I want to pursue this. I’m glad your daughter has Little Bear.

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