Life Advice from My Fuzzy Muses

My two crazy Jack Russell Terriers (Terrors) are great companions and guard dogs. They protect us from countless squirrels, birds, and joggers. Now that we’re settled in the new house in the woods, they have a whole host of squirrels, rabbits, and chipmunks to chase.

Each has a bed in my office, and they help me plot mysteries and listen while I talk through dialogue (if they’re not napping). My writing partners sleep on the job a lot.

They keep us on our toes. When it’s too quiet in the house, the pair of jacks are up to something (usually naughty). These two can hear a cheese or candy wrapper from three rooms away.

Here are some things I’ve learned from them about  life.

1.    Enjoy what you do. If not, find something else to spend your time on. There are way too many interesting things to see, eat, sniff, or bark at.

2.    Don’t waste a beautiful day inside. Go outside and have some fun.

3.    Wag and make friends. Relationships are important. This is Disney’s forte. We did a fair amount of remodeling to the new house, and we had a lot of workers in for long periods of time. Each morning, Disney greeted everyone and expected a pat or a hug.

4.    Don’t sit at your desk too long. Everybody needs a break.

5.    Just go for it. If you want something, grab it. They don’t waste time over-analyzing things.

6.    Bark if you really need to, but not too much. (Riley needs to practice what he preaches. He has the best time barking at squirrels, joggers, and anyone who steps on the front porch.)

7.    Make sure you nap when you need to. You need to recharge. My pair of jacks excel at this. They take napping to Olympic levels.

8.    Live in the moment. Don’t stress about what has happened or what might happen.

9.    Play hard. Life shouldn’t be all work. EVERYTHING is a game to a Jack Russell.

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Welcome, Mabry Hall!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Mabry Hall to the blog!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I grew up in central Mississippi and live in Louisiana now, with a sidestep to Texas for college and grad school. My favorite childhood times were spent at my grandparents’ farm, where I awoke every morning to the sound of cows at the back fence. My cousin and I roamed free with two very smart working dogs, Lassie— she’d have to be a collie with name like that, and Shep, a golden retriever. My 18 Karat Cold mystery series is set on a farm in northwest Louisiana, but my main character, Annalee Wyatt, buys and sells antique jewelry. Since I’m writing the story, I can have her pastures leased to a neighboring farmer. Annalee needs time for jewelry and sleuthing.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

Our Maine Coon cat is named Lucy, because she’s a redhead. Her personality is reflected in the orange tabby, Montrose, that lives with Annalee. Until a few years ago, we had a wonderful Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Henry, before Corgis became so cool. I’ve immortalized Henry in the books, but he belongs to Annalee’s handsome next door neighbor. He loves to hang out on Annalee’s front porch, flat on his back with his paws in the air. Anyone who’s spent time around a Corgi will have no trouble visualizing the position.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

In addition to the ones listed above, in the first book Annalee acquires an African Gray parrot named Lafitte. He spent his formative years in a bar in Baton Rouge next to the LSU campus, and he flirts with women and sings old rock-n-roll and zydeco tunes. Annalee’s Basset Hound, Pudge, belonged to her aunt, whose farm she inherited. In my imagination, Pudge spends most of his time with his nose to the ground, snuffling out the critters that live in the country in Louisiana. While they aren’t pets, the farm next door has begun raising dairy goats that have the mischievous personalities of the goats I’ve met.

My third book, A Rumor of Riches, features a redbone coonhound, Delores, and a Catahoula leopard dog named Isobel. Their tracking skills play a major part in the book. My problem is that writing about all of these animals makes me want to get one of each.

While the series isn’t particularly paranormal, Annalee’s Goat Hill Farm is haunted by a goat who lived there in 1885. Repentance comes and goes on his own schedule, and Annalee has been able to see him since she was a child. And the name? Repentance was my fifth great-grandfather. I wish I knew why his parents called him that.

What are you reading now?

Let me share what I’m listening to now, as I always have at least one book in progress on my phone. I’m currently listening to Circe, by Madeline Miller. It’s a retelling of the myth of Circe of the Odyssey, from her point of view. The story is strong, and the reader is perfect. I recently finished Spinning Silver, by Naomi Novik, which is a riff on the Rumpelstiltskin fairy tale told from the woman’s view. For fun and giggles, you can’t go wrong with The Kiss Quotient, by Helen Hoang. I never get a book without listening to the sample, because the reader can make or break the experience for me.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m writing the fourth novel in the 18 Karat Cold series. Since Annalee buys and sells antique jewelry, each book revolves around a specific piece. The first, An Engaging End, features an antique mine-cut diamond engagement ring. The second, A Regrettable Reunion, has a demantoid garnet brooch in the shape of a salamander. The third has gold coins and a squash-blossom turquoise necklace, and this as yet unnamed book has diamond chandelier earrings that are literally

Who is your favorite author and why?

While I don’t claim to have a favorite author, I love anything by Kate Atkinson and Hilary Mantel, and who can resist Jane Austen? PD James, Louise Penney, Elly Griffiths, and Ben Aaronovitch all captivate my attention with the first page. I usually have four or five books going at one time and read many of my fellow Sisters in Crime cozy writers. Then there’s nonfiction history and Alison Weir, and, oh, lately I’m plowing through the Bruno, Chief of Police series by Martin Walker, although they make me very hungry. My next trip to France may have to include Bordeaux.

My favorite book is The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame. He brought those animals to life for me. I’ve reread it many times, and each time brings a new understanding.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

My first dog was a fox terrier, delivered by Santa with a red bow as big as he was. I have a vivid memory of finding him under the tree. He was followed by a cocker spaniel, and then we switched to dachshunds. I had four of them through the years, and we once bottle-fed a litter of eight, which involved starting with all of them in one laundry basket. We knew we were through when they were all moved to the other one. I loved cats, but my mother didn’t, so I vowed to myself that I’d have one some day. We are currently on our fourth, the aforementioned Maine Coon, and she is the first that wasn’t a rescue kitty.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

Animals have always been a part of my life, and it seems a natural progression to have them as part of my characters’ lives. I think you can tell a lot about a person by the way they interact with something smaller and weaker; something that might be at their mercy or dependent on them.

I also think animals have such interesting personalities, if that isn’t anthropomorphizing them too much. My son and his wife have a cat who seemed to have almost no redeeming qualities. Clarence wasn’t friendly; he shed like a three-month-old Christmas tree, and had major litter box issues. I grudgingly tolerated him. Since my granddaughter was born, he’s a whole new cat. He will let that little girl do anything to him. He’s patient and calm, which is not so easy when there’s a two-year-old bouncing an alphabet block on your head. I’m surprised anew each time I visit.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

My first book had been out for a couple of months and was not setting the world on fire. Friends and relatives loved it, but they didn’t really count. Then one of those friends invited me to Dallas to speak to her book club. Fourteen women RSVP’d, but over twenty attended. They loved the book. I didn’t know them; they didn’t owe me special consideration; they weren’t there to be nice. They honestly liked it, and just as important, they were ready to read the next one! It was a game-changer.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

I don’t think hamsters qualify as unusual, but Captain Cook was quite the adventurer. He lived up to his name. He routinely escaped from his fortified cage, and once he disappeared for several days. He had made his way from his upstairs room to the downstairs dining room, and taken up residence behind our enormous sideboard. He was a rodent with a plan. We think he made several trips up and down the stairs, cheeks stuffed with food, and set up housekeeping.

Captain Cook lived much longer than a hamster should, and toward the end of his life, my eight-year-old son came to me several times, sobbing because he was dead. Each time I’d take him and tuck him under my shirt to get him warm. Sure enough, he’d perk up in ten minutes or so and be ready to roam again. He finally died when we were out of town, and my house-sitting friend went to every pet store searching for one that looked like him, thinking she could fool David, but the Captain was irreplaceable.

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why?

When I was a kid, I read in the crook of a big mulberry tree. Now I require something a bit more forgiving. If it’s too hot or too cold to be outside, I curl up in one of the chairs in the den. If the weather cooperates, I love to read on my screened back porch under the ceiling fan. The swing I sit in came from my grandmother’s house, and my father was swung to sleep in it when he was a baby, about ninety years ago.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

Finish your book. Begin another one. Finish that one and start on the third. Know that it’s a long haul, and the chance of life-altering financial success is slim. Join a group like Sisters in Crime, where you’ll receive encouragement and advice from many generous people. Be open to helpful criticism. And finally, don’t do it if it isn’t fun.

About Mabry:
I was born and raised in the South, and have lived in Mississippi, Texas, and now Louisiana. After an operating room fall curtailed my career as a nurse anesthetist, I turned my energy to writing. My boys are grown and live on the East Coast (egads!) I really do collect antique jewelry, and have amazing Pinterest boards that showcase the types I write about, so pour yourself a glass of tea or wine and prepare to be dazzled.

I write what I know, except for the murder part. Though I’ve traveled the globe, I always come back to the friendly and quirky people who populate northwest Louisiana.

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You can reach me through my website or follow me on Facebook, Pinterest, or Instagram. My books are available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Kobo.

http://www.mabryhall.com

https://www.facebook.com/18KaratCold/

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The DEADLY SOUTHERN CHARM Authors Talk Writing, Mysteries, and Pets

My pals from the Deadly Southern Charm mystery anthology are my guests today.  Please welcome, Lynn Cahoon, Frances Aylor, Kristin Kisska, J.A. Chalkley, and Stacie Giles. They’re here to talk about writing, books, their pets, and our new anthology.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

 Heather: We have two crazy Jack Russell Terriers, Disney and Riley. They’re from the same litter, and they keep us on our toes.

Lynn: Right now, our house is a little quiet. We lost our long-time companions, Homer (14) and Demon (19) in January of this year. They were Pomeranians. Homer was attacked by neighbor dogs in HIS yard and Demon decided it was his time a few weeks later. So it’s just Thor right now. He’s my way too tall cat. But next week, we’re getting two new puppies –Keeshonds. Dexter and Quinn.

Frances: Over the years I’ve owned a cocker spaniel, a labrador retriever, five cats, several goldfish and a hamster. The lab was a frisky, high-spirited dog that I took to obedience school so I could learn to manage him. While there I saw two beautiful, well-trained German shepherds. The German shepherd puppy in my thriller Money Grab combines the beauty of those dogs with the friskiness of my lab.

Kristin: I’m sorry to report that I don’t have any pets at present—not for want of loving them! That said, I drew on my experience horseback riding English saddle, both as a teen and an adult, to write my short story, “Unbridled.”

J.A.: I don’t have any pets at the moment. My last pet was a border collie mix named Woody. He was a rescue, and I later found out he had a brother named Cowboy.

Stacie: I grew up with a “guard” chihuahua named Taffie who used to boss all the neighborhood dogs and cats, including our other pets. Taffie and I were so close that my parents kept her death during my freshman year of college from me for weeks, thinking it would make living away from home too hard for me! I still miss the first dog I had as an adult, D’Artagnan–we called him D’Art–who was loving and lively, and would play fetch for hours. Now I enjoy an aging Staffordshire Terrier named Tinkerbell who patiently follows me everywhere, and endures the teasing of our cat who simply cannot leave poor Tinkerbell alone.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

 Heather: Most of my short stories and novels have animals. In my Delanie Fitzgerald series, Margaret, the English bulldog is a fixture in the private eye’s office. She’s a brown and white log with legs. I partnered with three other dogs on a novella project, To Fetch a Thief. My story is “Diggin’ up Dirt,” and it features a JRT named Darby who was based on my dog, Disney.

Lynn: Of course! Emma is Jill’s Golden Retriever in the Tourist Trap series. She even found a missing boy in an early book. Cat Latimer just got a barn cat and four kittens in book four of the series. And Angie from the Farm to Fork series has Dom – a St Bernard, Precious – a goat, and Mabel – the last remaining hen from Nona’s flock.

Frances: Webster is a German Shepherd puppy in my thriller Money Grab. He’s purchased by one of the characters as a guard dog, but his care and maintenance fall to the wife, who’s not a pet person. My main character Robbie later adopts the dog and considers him a faithful companion. He will be a recurring character in future novels.

 Kristin: I’ve only ever featured animals in one of my stories, “Unbridled.” The three show horses—Bay, D’artagnan, and Spade—all board at the same equestrian center in South Carolina’s Low Country. As readers soon find out, they are as commanding as their rider/owners.

J.A.: I’ve been working on a detective novel where the lead character owns two tabby cats, named Lenny and Squiggy. I’m telling my age with that reference.

Stacie: As I develop my main character, I plan for her to have a Siamese cat named Loopy who is almost preternaturally attuned to Vera’s recurrent migraines.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

 Heather: I am working on a cozy mystery novel, and it features a Jack Russell Terrier named Bijou. I am also working on a dog mystery for the second Mutt Mysteries series. It features a Rottweiler named Oscar, and the story’s called “The Fast and the Furriest.”

Lynn: As I write this, I’m working on book 4 of the Farm to Fork mystery series. The working title is DEATH ON A STICK. It’s set in my home state of Idaho and I love writing a late summer weather scene while the snow outside my window keeps getting deeper. After that, I’m doing my first Farm to Fork Novella which will have snow, but maybe I won’t be so sick of it by then.

Frances: I’m finishing up the second book in the Robbie Bradford mystery series. In this one, Robbie goes to Switzerland with a client, to help her manage some issues with family money. The third book will be set in either Egypt or Jordan, both of which I recently visited. I’m also working on financial presentations for various groups, to give people guidance on how to manage their money.

Kristin: I’m polishing my second suspense novel, which is a quest for a missing Faberge Egg throughout Prague and other Central European cities. I’m also in the process of drafting my third novel, a domestic suspense, which features Lulu the tabby cat.

J.A.: I’m working on a short story for a sci fi/fantasy magazine submission

Stacie: Actually, I am currently working on a nonfiction project, a college-level online resource on the United States Intelligence Community, drawing on my background as a CIA analyst. I’m also trying to hone my fiction writing skills and develop a series of short stories set in Memphis, Tennessee from 1920 through the 1960s in which Vera and her policeman cousin Burnell navigate the turbulent social changes of the time while solving crimes in a way that is both merciful and just.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

 Heather: My Jack Russell Terrier Riley has a thing for paper. One day, I set my open purse on the floor next to my desk while I was working. When I got up, I noticed the ATM receipt for $40 was wet and on the floor. Curious, I rummaged through my purse. Riley had pulled it out along with a twenty. He ate one of my twenty-dollar bills.

Lynn: Thor (the cat) liked to hide behind the television when the dogs went out first thing in the morning. Then he’d pop out and stand on his hide legs and pretend to be an attacking bear. One morning, Homer wasn’t having it. He bulldozed the cat into the television stand, then went to stand by the door waiting for us to let him out. Thor stopped playing that game after that.

Frances: When I was a child, we visited a family friend whose dog had recently had puppies. When my parents got ready to leave, they found me sitting on the floor in the utility room, with all five puppies lying on my outstretched legs, determined that I was going to take them home with me. My dad convinced me that the pups were too young to leave their mother, but promised I could come back later and pick out one for myself. That cocker spaniel puppy and I grew up together.

 J.A.: We adopted Woody for my son, who was seven at the time. They grew up together. Woody would listen to everyone, but my son. Woody wasn’t allowed on the bed, yeah that rule didn’t last long. When he heard our bedroom door close at night, he would jump on my son’s bed. Anytime he heard the door open he’d jump down and play innocent.

Stacie: My children were young when hyperactive D’Art joined our family. The kids would put on roller skates to take him on “walks” which were really mad careening around the neighborhood! They could only stop by collapsing on the lawn or, occasionally, running into a tree!

What do your pets do when you are writing?

Heather: There are two dog beds on either side of my desk in the office. They nap mostly while I’m writing or editing. Sometimes, they help with plotting.

Lynn: Thor sleeps on my desk. I’m hoping the new puppies will hang out under my desk. (As long as they don’t chew on the cords.)

Frances: My lab was an outdoor dog who enjoyed exploring the woods behind our house.

 Kristin: Oh, I wish I had a cat. If it were like my previous fur babies, it would ignore me actively until I tried to pet it, then shun me. Is there anything more divine than purring???

Stacie: Tinkerbell lies on the floor just outside the open door of my office. She seems to feel she is guarding me. The cat Azzie has to climb on my lap or, if I’m standing up using my sit/stand desk, he’ll reach up and claw my legs until I pick him up and let him investigate what I’m doing. Once satisfied, he’ll curl up in a comfy chair near me and snooze.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

 Heather: I grew up in a suburban house. We had a couple of gold fish over the years. My dad, a 46-year veteran of the Virginia Beach Police force, had a police dog once. I didn’t have dogs until I moved out.

Lynn: I had a grey cheek parakeet once. She was part of a breeding pair. She didn’t like men. So she’d bite me every time my husband or my son would come close. But she did like drinking Coke out of the lip of my Coke can.

Frances: We once had an aquarium filled with exotic fish. I especially liked the neon tetras, the angelfish, and the whiskery catfish.

Kristin: My family had lots of pets while I grew up, from dogs and cats, to fish, birds, and gerbils. The most unique pet, though, was our ferret, Bartles.

J.A.: I didn’t grow up on a farm, but somehow we always seemed to have farm animals. Over the years there were chickens, calves that needed to be bottle feed till they were big enough to release into pasture, and goats. My mother loved goats. We had at least one for years. There were dogs, cats, hamsters and for a brief period rabbits.

Stacie: We had some geckos when we lived in Hawaii. They were amusing to watch climb the walls and ceilings! But it wasn’t amusing when my husband brought home flying cockroaches from work to feed them! Of course, the cockroaches got away. Sigh.

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

Heather: Writing is a business. You need to treat it like that. It includes a lot of record-keeping and marketing. You also need to guard your writing time. There are so many distractions and obligations. You really do need a writing schedule.

Lynn: It’s okay to stand up for what you want and how you want your book to look. You can’t wait for the muse to hit to write. Set a word count and meet it. Otherwise, the book won’t rise to the top of your to do pile. I write first because I’m better in the morning and I don’t write well late at night. Your mileage may vary.

Frances: Writing a novel takes so much longer than I thought it would. I have to schedule a time to write each day; otherwise, other projects intrude on my time. Marketing a book is even more time consuming. Mastering social media is a continuing challenge.

Kristin: I wish I’d known that once I type The End, an author is really only a third the way through the publishing process. The next third is revising and editing, and the last third is publishing/marketing the work (of course, while working through the next project). Also, many words can be written before sunrise. Use your time wisely!

J.A.: Writing is hard work. Not just the writing, but the business side of it.

Stacie: Well, I truly am just starting in fiction writing now. One thing I already know from my nonfiction work, however, is that writing takes rewriting, and rewriting, and double checking, and rewriting some more!

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why?

Heather: I love to write at the beach when we’re visiting. I grew up in Virginia Beach, and I miss the ocean. When at home, I love to write on my deck on sunny days.

Lynn: I love writing at my desk because I have a desktop with a 32-inch screen. But I can and do write anywhere. Reading, I need good light. My favorite place to get story now is during my commute in my car.

Frances: Most of the time I write on my laptop at my office desk. In warm weather, I take the laptop out to the gazebo. Most of my reading is done in bed at night, just before I go to sleep.

Kristin: I get my best writing done in my silent, quiet writers cave at home. Even better, when everyone in my family is either asleep or away. Reading, however, I can do absolutely anywhere, but my favorite place is in a bookstore café.

J.A.: I have an office space set up in my she cave at home. It’s quiet and comfort.

Stacie: I am happy as a clam to read wherever I am! But for writing, I prefer my office, where I’m surrounded by all the things I need – all kinds of materials and, most importantly, a comfy chair and a lovely view out the window when I need to clear my head!

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

Heather: Be persistent. Don’t give up. Writing and publishing are hard. You need to keep at it.

Lynn: Make sure it’s really what you want to do. You spend way too much time working and alone for it to be just a whim.

Frances: Know why you want to write. This is a very competitive business. If you’re writing to be rich and famous, perhaps you should pick another line of work. If you’re writing because you have stories you want to share with others, then stick with it.

 Kristin: The only requirement for being a writer is to actually write. All other rules you hear are merely suggestions and guidelines. It also helps if you read a lot, too. Good luck!

J.A.: Read a lot. Find authors who’s style you like and study it. Figure out why you like it. In the beginning you may find yourself imitating other writers, but with time you’ll find your own style.

Stacie: Remember that writing is fundamentally a solitary endeavor. You can and should make lots of connections with other writers and readers, but most of your time must be devoted to writing, something no one else can do with you. You’re on your own! Make sure you’re happy with the solitude.

Heather Weidner
Lynn Cahoon
Frances Aylor
Kristin Kisska
J. A. Chalkley
Stacie Giles

About Us

Frances Aylor, CFA combines her investing experience and love of travel in her financial thrillers. MONEY GRAB is the first in the series. www.francesaylor.com

Lynn Cahoon is the NYT and USA Today author of the best-selling Tourist Trap, Cat Latimer and Farm-to-Fork mystery series. www.lynncahoon.com

 J. A. Chalkley is a native Virginian. She is a writer, retired public safety communications officer, and a member of Sisters in Crime.

Stacie Giles, after a career as a political scientist, linguist, and CIA analyst, is now writing historical cozies with a twist.  Her first short story is in honor of her grandfather who was a policeman in Memphis in the 1920s.

Kristin Kisska is a member of International Thriller Writers and Sisters in Crime, and programs chair of the Sisters in Crime – Central Virginia chapter. www.kristinkisska.com

Heather Weidner is the author of the Delanie Fitzgerald Mysteries. She has short stories in the Virginia is for Mysteries series, 50 SHADES OF CABERNET and TO FETCH A THIEF. She lives in Central Virginia with her husband and Jack Russell terriers. www.heatherweidner.com

Let’s Be Social

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LethalLadiesWrite/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LethalLadiesCVA?lang=en

Website: https://www.sistersincrimecentralvirginia.com/anthologies

Book Links

Wildside: http://wildsidepress.com/deadly-southern-charm-a-lethal-ladies-mystery-anthology-edited-by-mary-burton-and-mary-miley-paperback/

Wildside eBook: http://wildsidepress.com/deadly-southern-charm-a-lethal-ladies-mystery-anthology-edited-by-mary-burton-and-mary-miley-epub-kindle-pdf/?ctk=92a212b3-7ff7-473d-a5dd-78ab99163c27

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Deadly-Southern-Charm-Mystery-Anthology/dp/1479448397

 

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Welcome, June Whatley!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome June Whatley to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I write under the names of June Breland Whatley or June B. Whatley. I’ve been married for 48 years to my husband Jim. We have one son who is grown, married and has four children. My husband and I are both retired and live in Tennessee with our two fur babies Bear and Millie.

My first book, published in 1996, was for homeschoolers on the topic of socialization. We homeschooled our son junior high through high school and he went on to college and then got his Masters’ Degree.

My second book was published in 2016 and is available on Amazon. The title is #LifeChange: A Treasure Hunt for More. It is based on a dream from the Lord that shows how and why people fear having a relationship with Christ and shows why, even after coming to Christ, people are attacked by the enemy. The book leads the reader through steps of accepting Christ, learning how to pray, and how to protect themselves from the enemy after their salvation experience. It ends with a biblical explanation that shows the Kingdom of God is real.

My writing is driven by a need to introduce people to or draw people closer to the Lord. My belief is that the Return of Christ is coming soon. Time is short and people need to have a personal relationship with Jesus in order to be saved.

My current work, follows a similar pattern, but engages the younger reader in a story to aid in expressing these principles.

Tell us about your pets.

Bear is my ‘rescue’ dog. It took three trips to the shelter before I found him, then he ‘rescued me.’ J I was a cancer survivor and had undergone chemo, surgery and radiation. I was cancer-free, but my strength and lung capacity were not back to normal. I had little energy and was gloomy most of the time. Bear got me up, out and moving. He was a 9 lb ball of fur and energy, just what I needed to perk up my spirit and encourage me to be more active. Six and a half years later, he is now about 100 lbs and I’m still cancer-free and in much better health. Shortly after getting Bear, we moved to Tennessee.

In Tennessee, I had seen the large, furry Great Pyrenees dogs and wanted one. I met a man who was giving away puppies. The first owner had neglected them terribly, so Stan purchased them from him, and worked to get them healthy, then he was giving them away. I drove to his house and Millie greeted me at my car. She waddled her three-month-old, 37 lb body up to my car. I called Stan to be sure he still wanted to give her up and he did, so I put her in a travel cage in my car and headed for the veterinarian’s. She was checked over, given a bath and declared in good health so I took her home.

By this time, Bear was so spoiled, people questioned how he would get along with another dog, but I wasn’t worried. When I opened the door, and set her down on the floor. Bear, now about 39 lbs. and Millie looked at each other, their eyes lit up and they started chasing each other around, inside the condo. It was adorable. They’ve been best buds ever since.

What are you reading now?

I’m currently reading, The Emotional Craft of Fiction, by Donald Maass. It is by far the best book I have read on the subject of writing or crafting a story or novel. The book that I have in progress, is ‘finished,’ but now I am going through Mr. Maass’ book and literally addressing every area that he discusses. I thought my book was good before, but now I see what was missing. Hopefully this book will reach many young people and show them the love of Christ and God.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m currently working on a book for ages 8-12+ readers called, Beware the Fallen. It is the story of three siblings from a Christian home. The middle child, Ashton age eleven, feels left out and unloved, but neither is true. It takes a life-changing event (being kidnapped by a dragon and nearly losing his life) to bring him to a true relationship with the King and His Son.

This also brings love and understanding into his relationship with his older brother, Mican (thirteen) and younger sister, Shayla age ten. The story follows them for the next year and their many visits to talk with the King. The sequel follows Mican, Ashton and Shayla on their travels through time portals where they witness Biblical scenes, as they happen.

Who is your favorite author and why?

I love Jane Austen. Her characters and scenery are so vivid. I also love Agatha Christie. Her mysteries are intricate, without being gory. And a more recent author, Andrew Peterson is a new favorite. Peterson’s Wingfeather Saga is amazing. It is great for young people, but held my attention to the end.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

When I was a kid, we had three acres. That’s not vast, but allowed us to have dogs and cats. I still remember all the names of my dogs: Peanut, Snowball, Pharaoh, Blue, and Foots. When we found Foots, he was a puppy, but had enormous feet, that’s where the name came from. He turned out to be mostly Great Dane and was huge.

My favorite cat and there were many, was Persia, a smoky gray Persian.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

In my new book, the animals are not pets, they are characters in their own right. Some of the animals are in the service of the King. For example: Warrior, a noble horse; Patrice the leader of the butterflies; Ozwan the swan; Omuth the dragonfly; and of course a dove (the Holy Spirit).

Why do you include animals in your writing?

For this book, Beware the Fallen, it was a logical progression to use animals.

Since the new book takes place partly in a fallen, Garden of Eden-type setting, the dragon (Satan) has his followers. These animals are villains who inhabit the mysterious garden and create havoc for the three main characters.

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

The animals that I mentioned by name in question #7, who are in the Kings’ service are not ‘service animals’ as we use the term, but they do the King’s bidding, such as guiding the children to safety in various instances. They also talk and teach the children lessons during their journey.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

As a fifth grader, I needed to do a book report and I found Black Beauty. I was a very slow reader, but I’ve always loved horses, so the horse in the book got me through. I now understand that there is a ‘lag-time’ between when my eye sees a word and when my brain registers it. “Way back then,” they didn’t understand problems like mine. I had a large vocabulary, but I always struggled to read. I never let it stop me. I went on to get a Master of Arts Degree from Regent University.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

Take time to learn your craft. There is much more to writing than grammar and punctuation. Read contemporary best sellers in the area in which you want to write.

Contemporary, because although Jane Austen is amazing, most young people won’t sit still long enough to get through all of the details in the way she wrote. It is a different time that we live in.

And my best advice to any writer would be, ‘don’t be in a hurry.’ When I started writing I believed that God had a ‘mission’ for me and that I needed to hurry and get it done. Now I realize that even with a calling, waiting and timing are important.

What is one lesson you learned about writing or publishing that you’d like to share?

Hire an editor to do deep edits, not just to put commas in the right place. It is pricey, but it is very necessary. Sometime you are so close to the story, you mentally read in what should be there. Your readers don’t have that luxury and an editor needs to check continuity and other issues. Use an editor that is in the business, not just a free-lancer. You can also learn a lot about the business side of publishing from an editor.

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Travels with Shammy

By Maggie King

Have you ever traveled with a cat? I don’t mean those horrendous drives to the vet with a shrieking animal in the back seat. I’m talking about soaring above the clouds, “flying the friendly skies,” with your favorite feline tucked under the seat in front of you. While you relax and sip your Cabernet, you feed tidbits to little [insert cat’s name here]. All is well.

Shammy was a sweet and glam calico cat who liked traveling. In the car, I’d let her out of her carrier and she’d gaze out the window, enjoying the passing scenery through the Antelope Valley of Southern California. Sometimes she’d crawl under the seats and get under my feet as I drove—not a good thing.

When Glen and I moved from California to Virginia in 1996, we had many things to consider (where to live, were to work, etc.). But the most pressing concern: how to get Shammy cross country. Sure, she enjoyed being a car passenger—but would she like it for three days in a car loaded up with our possessions? And the overnight stops at strange motels?

We came up with the purr-fect solution: Glen would drive the packed car and sleep in the strange motels. I would ship my car, leaving Shammy and me to travel in style, by air.

I learned that I didn’t have to put Shammy in cargo; she could accompany me in the cabin. I purchased a special carrier that would fit under the seat. The vet dispensed tranquilizers. We were all set.

At security, the TSA agent demanded that I take Shammy out of the carrier. If I’d anticipated this (this was pre-911 times) I would have brought a leash. I maintained the tightest of grips on Shammy until we made it through security and I could return her to the carrier.

On board, I braced myself for loud complaints from allergy-ridden passengers. Thankfully, the plane wasn’t full, and Shammy and I had three seats to ourselves. No one complained, in fact everyone was kind and asked how she was doing.

How was Shammy doing?

Anxious, bewildered, awake—those adjectives suffice to describe her state. I expected the tranquilizer to make her drowsy, but she remained hyper alert for the duration. She couldn’t stand up in the carrier that had to meet size regulations for under seat storage. Thankfully, she was quiet, and endured it all with her customary dignity.

And how was I doing?

I suspect that Shammy fared better than I did. I found the whole ordeal nerve-wracking to say the least. Mostly because of my concern for Shammy and not knowing what to expect from one minute to the next. Sure, we soared above the clouds, “flying the friendly skies.” But relaxing it wasn’t. As for tempting Shammy with tidbits . . . let’s just say she resisted temptation.

Minutes before boarding after a stopover in Baltimore, the heavens opened. Problematic, as we had to walk outside to board the puddle jumper that would take us to Charlottesville. A kind young man in an airport shop gave me two large plastic bags. I covered Shammy’s carrier with one, and draped the other over my head and shoulders. We dashed to the plane and boarded, Shammy completely dry, me only slightly damp.

Once in Charlottesville, we took a cab to pick up my car and headed for the motel where I had a reservation. The next day I got the keys to the apartment where we were to live for three months while we looked for a permanent home. Glen arrived four days later.

Shammy didn’t eat or use the litter box for a couple of days. After that, she loved the place. Squirrels, chipmunks, and birds came right up to the patio door where she parked herself 24/7. Occasionally she and a cat had a hissing contest.

That wraps up “Travels with Shammy.” Shammy crossed the rainbow bridge in 2002. When the Albemarle County (Charlottesville) SPCA built a new facility, Glen and I purchased a brick and dedicated it to our special friend: “Shammy King, in our hearts.”

In my Hazel Rose Book Group series, Hazel’s backstory reveals that her beautiful calico cat named Shammy accompanied her when she moved from Los Angeles to the east coast and settled in Richmond, Virginia.

Shammy lives on, in our hearts … and on the page.

Shammy has appeared in Pens, Paws, and Claws before. Read it here.

 

Maggie King is the author of the Hazel Rose Book Group mysteries, including Murder at the Book Group and Murder at the Moonshine Inn. Her short stories appear in Deadly Southern Charm, Virginia is for Mysteries (Vols. 1&2), and 50 Shades of Cabernet.

Maggie is a member of Sisters in Crime, James River Writers, and the American Association of University Women. She has worked as a software developer, retail sales manager, and customer service supervisor. Maggie graduated from Elizabeth Seton College and earned a B.S. degree in Business Administration from Rochester Institute of Technology. She has called New Jersey, Massachusetts, and California home. These days she lives in Richmond, Virginia with her husband, Glen, and cats, Morris and Olive. She enjoys reading, walking, movies, traveling, theatre, and museums.

Website: www.maggieking.com

Facebook: MaggieKingAuthor

Twitter: MaggieKingAuthr

Instagram: authormaggieking

Amazon: Maggie’s Amazon Author Page

 

 

 

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Welcome, Gayle Bartos-Pool

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Gayle Bartos-Pool to the blog.

(Q) Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing. (A) I grew up with a dad in the Air Force. We lived in a few foreign countries and I got a terrific education. When I started writing I thought I would write spy novels using my dad’s experiences and my imagination to come up with stories. Ten years of research and writing later, I had three books, very long books, but no publisher. Then my husband said: “You used to be a private detective. Why don’t you write a detective story?” Yes, I used to be an undercover private investigator. So I started writing detective novels. I now have three series in print: the Gin Caulfield series featuring an over fifty gal who still packs heat; the Johnny Casino Casebook series about a private eye with a past, he just hopes it doesn’t catch up with him; and Chance McCoy in his first book, Second Chance, about a private detective who dies on a case, but he gets the opportunity of a lifetime. But my writing also includes a trio of Christmas stories and a pair of short story collections filled with murder and mayhem and a few laughs along the way. There are a few other books with my name on them as well. I guess you could say: “Writing is my life.”

(Q) Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing? (A) My husband and I have had a passel of pets over the past thirty-three years and yes, many of them have made guest appearances in my books. Gin Caulfield and her husband Fred have two Italian Greyhounds named Sherlock and Foxtrot, named after the two boys we got from the Los Angeles Pound one Fourth of July weekend. I saw Sherlock first and fell in love, then this other skinny guy walked over to him and put his paws on Sherlock’s back like he was protecting him. Needless to say, we took both dogs home. Watson came from Pooch Heaven, an animal sanctuary that rescues animals. Candy came to us when some neighbor kids knocked on our door and said they found this mutt walking down the street and they thought it might be ours. I was holding her in my arms by then. I said she wasn’t ours. They said they would take her to the pound. I said, “No. We’ll keep her.” And we did and have her still. Cookie came from a guy outside of VONS who was giving away dogs. Sir Winston was gotten from the Glendale Humane Society after I heard that soldiers going off to the Gulf War were dropping off their dogs since they couldn’t take them into battle. I spotted Winston and adopted him. His health wasn’t the best and after a few years we lost him. Cookie had grown quite attached by then and his loss was hard on her. I saw an ad for a found dog in the local paper. I called up and said the dog wasn’t ours, but if they couldn’t find him a home, we’ll take him. We got Noodles a few days later. Duffy came from the Glendale Humane Society. Angel, a cat, was found wandering through a vacant lot. Sylvester was given to me by co-workers when I lost Duffy. Cat (that was his name) was a stray and Duffy’s best friend. And then there was Fred. I’ll tell you about him a little later. You asked if these guys show up in my work. You bet.

(Q) What are you reading now? (A) Currently I have been reading the works of E. Phillips Oppenheim. He wrote almost a hundred years ago, but his mysteries and spy novels read like they were written yesterday. I found his book Spies and Intrigues, a collection of novellas and short stories, on line. I also bought a collection of 100 of his novels (you read me right – 100) in e-book format on line as well. I am 72% through the e-books. There are a few other writers that wrote nearly a hundred years ago as well. Let me introduce you to Anna Katharine Green. She started by writing very intricate plots with clever details and clever sleuthing techniques. She wrote stories about a young debutante who solved crimes, a young man who analyzed a crime scene down to the lint in the victim’s pockets, and a spinster lady who helped out the local police in solving crimes.

If this sounds a little too much like Nancy Drew or a young Sherlock Holmes or a Miss Marple, let me mention that Anna Katharine Green was born in 1846. Her books predated the great writers of these previously mentioned tomes. She is considered the Mother of the Detective Novel. Women weren’t writing much more than poetry back then and there were very few male writers of fiction, much less mysteries. She had to discover new territories and did it unbelievably well. She did get reviews and notoriety. In fact, the Pennsylvania Senate debated whether or not a woman could have actually written her first book, The Leavenworth Case. She wrote it and 39 more stories. The Pennsylvania Senate had to eat a little crow. I also like Mary Roberts Rinehart. She wrote a batch of mysteries nearly a century ago. Her books are fantastic.

As for contemporary writers, I totally love M.M. Gornell and her Route 66 stories. Ms. Gornell takes us to these small towns along Route 66 and we meet the most intriguing people. Her latest, The Movie-Maker, had an ending that knocked my socks off. Sasscer Hill writes books about the racetrack much in the vein of Dick Francis. Matt Coyle has a marvelous series featuring Rick Cahill. Jacqueline Vick has a bunch of books. Her Civility Rules is a hoot. They all write mystery/detective stories, but that’s what I like to read.

(Q) What writing projects are you currently working on? (A) For several years I was Speaker’s Bureau Director of Sisters-in-Crime/Los Angeles. I set up author panels, but I also had the opportunity to teach a few writing classes to help fellow members work on short stories that they wished to submit to our anthology published every other year. I enjoyed teaching the class, but in preparing for that job I realized that I actually had a method in the madness that we call writing. I formatted a class curriculum and wrote up a lengthy handout for attendees. A little while after I began those classes, I turned that class handout into a book called The Anatomy of a Short Story Workbook. It consists of fairly basic prompts and thoughts about writing not only short stories, but things that might help with other writing endeavors. I happen to belong to a web blog with fellow writers that I have known for a number of years. We all are published, but we all learned many things from each other as we went down this path to publication. Our blog has a purpose: “We are a group of published writers who come here weekly to entertain, inform, and encourage you in your writing and your reading journey. Grab a cup of coffee, get comfortable, and join us.” https://thewritersinresidence.com/ That is our mission. As one of the members, I have been penning articles on writing based on the short bits from my workbook, expanding the thoughts and turning them into more detailed pieces. I am just about finished with the book to help writers called: So You Want to be a Writer. It will debut next year.

(Q) How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing? (A) Animals do appear in my work. In the Gin Caulfield books the two dogs just share the house with Gin and her husband. They don’t get involved with the detecting… yet. The two humans spend the bulk of each story hunting for the bad guys. In my Christmas stories, the case is quite different. In the very first book, Bearnard’s Christmas, a Polar bear features predominantly in the story as well photos of many of the Christmas decorations in my home and miniature houses that I built. I have nearly 5000 Santas in my collection. It’s the story about Elaine Ivy, a woman who loves animals, but sometimes she gets herself into trouble trying to defend them. Even her husband tells her she can’t save them all. At a Christmas Party she is given a stuffed Polar bear. A magical voice tells her its name is “Bearnard.” On Christmas Eve, Elaine falls asleep under the tree and wakes up at the North Pole where she meets Santa Claus, Mrs. C and a big Polar bear named, of course, Bearnard, and a bunch of other furry and feathery friends. But it turns out even the animals at the North Pole need a little help, but it will take more than human kindness this time to make everything right. For this book I built the Santa castle and fashioned many of the inhabitants including Santa, Mrs. C, and Bearnard out of clay. This was truly a labor of love.

(Q) Why do you include animals in your writing? (A) Animals are included because they are so much of my life. From my first dog, Sukoshi, that I got on my eighth birthday to the ones we rescued from the pound or the street or were given to us, pets have always occupied a large part of my heart. They each have had a personality so naturally they show up on the pages of books I write.

(Q) What’s your real-life funniest pet story? (A) There are many funny or touching stories about the pets I have had, but one that comes to mind goes all the way back to when my dad was stationed in France back in the 60s. Before we got the house we were to stay in for three years, we stayed in a nice hotel in Laon, France. Our dog Sukoshi got to accompany us on the ship that took us to France along with our 1956 pink and white Plymouth. Sukosh would be relegated to the hotel room while we were out getting breakfast or shopping. One time we came back to the hotel and were told Sukosh was in the dining room with the owner. It seems that the Beagle had been barking and the owner decided it best to keep her downstairs with her. We had dinner that night at the hotel and Sukosh was allowed to sit at our table. This was France, after all. The waiter said he would bring her some steak tartare as a treat. The raw, chopped steak was set before the little Beagle and she turned up her nose. No raw meat for her. The waiter took the plate back to the chef and they cooked it. She ate that. I guess Southern Beagles didn’t know French cuisine.

(Q) When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know? (A) Back in about the sixth grade we were given one of those forms asking us to list three occupations that we might want to be when we grew up. My answers were: writer, writer, and writer. Even before that, in 1955, when I was eight, I put together my first book. It was several newspaper clippings for the movie The Lady and the Tramp glued onto paper and folded into book form. I loved the movie (It was about dogs for goodness sake.) and wanted to have a remembrance. I still have the book.

(Q) Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why? (A) I read in bed in the morning after Richard goes off to work and sometimes in the evening for an hour or two before I join him in the living room for some television. I turn on one of the music channels on the TV and enjoy the background sounds. I tell this part to people attending my writing classes. I mention that there should always be somebody to root for in their story. I also say that I want the main characters to be people I would invite into my house because when I am sitting in bed, I don’t want anybody in there with me that I don’t like. That always gets a laugh, but I am serious. I have closed books that had such disagreeable characters that I didn’t want to spend any of my time in bed with them. I hope my students got the hint.

(Q) What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer? (A) Years ago I worked in a bank. I was writing my first book back then, writing from eight at night until midnight. At the stroke of twelve, whether I was in the middle of a paragraph, a sentence, or a word, I stopped and went to bed. Several of my co-workers knew my ambition to be a writer, a published writer. One guy introduced me to a young man who wanted to know how to be a writer. I asked him what he had written so far. “Nothing,” he said. This young man was not a writer. Writers write. I didn’t tell him: “You’ll never be a writer, fool, until you sit down and write something, anything. Read it, edit it, and keep writing. Finish a story or even a book and then come back and ask me that question again.” No, I didn’t “jump in his chili,” as it were. But I did tell him he needed to think of a story, write a paragraph about it, then expand it to a short story and then flesh it out into a novel. I never heard from him after that. But my advice goes to anyone who wants to be a writer. The advice: WRITE.

(Q) What is one lesson you learned about writing or publishing that you’d like to share? (A) Whether you are just starting out in the writing field or you have a few books under your belt, always remember that it’s your name on the front of that book you wrote. You want it to be the best product you can produce. That means editing it a few more times than you first thought was necessary. It means asking advice from others in the writing field, but take the advice with a grain of salt. If your book is rejected by an agent, try another one. If a publisher doesn’t think your book would fit their imprint, try another one. If people tell you not to follow your dream, tell them that’s not the direction you want to go and it’s not a dream. There are always other avenues. Always do your very best. Never give up. It isn’t a dream.

(Q) What book would you like to mention today? (A) Since the Pens, Paws, and Claws Blog is mainly about those feathery and furry loves of our lives that might also turn up in the pages of our books, I wanted to mention Second Chance that has a rather “coincidental” tie-in to the subject of pets. The book blurb under the title on the first page reads: Chance McCoy just got the opportunity of a lifetime.

The blurb on the back of the book reads:

Chance McCoy is a private detective killed during a routine case, but he is given a second chance to make good. But with his track record as a P.I., he just might blow this chance, too.

That book blurb tells us about Chance, but no pets… so far.

All through the book, Chance views people he encounters as some kind of pooch. Droopy Bloodhound eyes on one guy. A teenage girl’s bodyguards are viewed as Bulldogs. Another set of hired muscle are called Rottweilers. Chance even enlists the services of a cadaver dog named Maurice to see if a body is buried in someone’s backyard.

It really wasn’t a coincidence on my part to make these comparisons because, you see, I dedicated the book to Freddy J. Feathers, our beloved parakeet who had recently passed away. I found Fred wandering in the backyard about six years earlier and he got a “second chance” with us. That fact fit perfectly with this particular book. And the short section at the end of the book ties my love of pets up with a big red ribbon. You see, Chance is asked to go to the local pound and… Wait a minute. You’ll have to read the book to see what happens there.

But pets, or members of the family as we call them in our house, have been a large part of my life and they seem to have played a big part in my writing as well. I guess we do leave bits of our heart in everything we write.

And one more thing about Second Chance, all the profits from the sale of this book go to pet rescue sites. So far we have donated to Best Friends Animal Society, Karma Rescue, and the ASPCA after Hurricane Harvey. It may not be much, but we do what we can.

About Gayle:

A former private detective and a reporter for a small weekly newspaper, Gayle Bartos-Pool (G.B. Pool) has numerous books in print: The Johnny Casino Casebook 1- Past Imperfect, The Johnny Casino Casebook 2 – Looking for Johnny Nobody, and The Johnny Casino Casebook 3 – Just Shoot Me; Media Justice, Hedge Bet, and Damning Evidence in the Gin Caulfield P.I. Series; From Light To DARK and Only in Hollywood, collections of short stories; Eddie Buick’s Last Case, Second Chance, The Santa Claus Singer, Bearnard’s Christmas, The Santa Claus Machine, Every Castle Needs a Dragon, and Who Killed Christmas? Other stand alones: CAVERNS; Eddie Buick’s Last Case; Enchanted, The Ring, The Rose, and The Rapier. Spy novels: The Odd Man, Dry Bones, Star Power. She is the former Speakers Bureau Director for Sisters in Crime/Los Angeles and also a member of Mystery Writers of America and The Woman’s Club of Hollywood. She teaches writing classes: “Anatomy of a Short Story,” “How to Write Convincing Dialogue” and “Writing a Killer Opening Line” in sunny Southern California. Website: www.gbpool.com.

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Websites: www.gbpool.com, https://thewritersinresidence.com/ , https://www.facebook.com/gayle.bartospool

 

 

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Welcome, Gail Z. Martin!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Gail Z. Martin to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I write epic fantasy, urban fantasy, steampunk, and comedic horror as Gail Z. Martin. As Morgan Brice, I write urban fantasy MM paranormal romance. I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was 14, and my first book was published when I was 45. We work with big publishers, small press and we also publish some of our books indie. My husband, Larry N. Martin, and I write full time, and several of our series are co-written. Behind the scenes, we both work on everything together.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing—We have a Maltese named Kipp and a Golden Retriever named Flynn. Kipp was definitely the inspiration for Baxter in my Deadly Curiosities stories, and Chase, our past Golden Retriever, was the inspiration for Bo in that series.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Baxter in Deadly Curiosities shows up a lot. Did you know that vampire glamor works on a dog and makes him stop yipping at the door? There’s a running joke about that in the Deadly Curiosities books. Bo is the ghost of the main character’s golden retriever and he’s her spirit protector. She can summon his ghost with a shake of his old dog collar/tags and he is a very good ally in a fight.

What writing projects are you currently working on?—I have lots in the works! My goal is to have sequels for all our current series this year as well as launch a couple of new series. That’s very ambitious, and we might not get everything done, but I’m going to try! right now, I’m finishing up The Rising, which is a Morgan Brice romance and is the sequel to Badlands. It’s a psychic and a cop in Myrtle Beach working together to solve supernatural murders, and this one involves pirates and lost treasure! After that, I’ll be working on the fourth Deadly Curiosities novel, the next installment in the Spells Salt and Steel universe with Larry, and a sequel in my new Night Vigil urban fantasy series.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.—Growing up, I had a gray tabby cat named Misty and a miniature schnauzer named Heather. Since Larry and I have been married, we had two black/black and tan cocker spaniels and then a golden retriever, two Himalayan cats, and now our current golden and Maltese.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?—So far, they aren’t the point of view characters or a central part of the story, but they are very important to the characters. That may change, since I have a shifter romance series in mind!

Why do you include animals in your writing?—I love my pets, and pets have always been very important to me. They don’t work for every character—some travel too much or aren’t in a situation where they could provide a good pet home. But I think that showing characters connected to other people and animals helps to flesh out their story and make them more real and relatable.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know? —I decided I wanted to be a writer when I was 14 and I figured out that it was a something you could choose to do. I had never really thought about who the people were who wrote the books before that. Once I made up my mind, I chose my college major, my graduate school major, and my career to support that someday goal!

What do your pets do when you are writing?—They ‘commute’ back and forth between my desk and my husband’s desk, keeping us both company!

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?—That the whole process can take a while to get off the ground, so don’t get discouraged!

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why?—I really love days when I can write on my screened-in porch, because it’s so pretty out there. The dogs like it, too, and come hang out with me. I can watch birds and squirrels and lizards!

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?—Never give up!

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Cute Pet Memes to Make You Laugh

Need a good laugh? Who doesn’t? The world‘s a troubling place.

That’s where cute pets come to the rescue. Pet your cat, dog, ferret, hamster—and enjoy them. They give us such joy, comfort, and happiness. Ever notice how they make us smile even when they’re not doing anything?

 

From Bobbi Hanson’s Pinterest board

 

But maybe you don’t/can’t have pets. Or you’re at work and the minutes to quitting time are going oh-so-slowly. Or you just can’t get enough cuteness in your life.

Enjoy a few of my favorite cute pet pictures and memes. If you’re on Facebook and/or Pinterest, you’ve probably seen some of these countless times, but they’re always good for a belly laugh.

From lolzombie.com

 

This is my Olive to a T:

From Homer Blind WonderCat

 

From Greenleafpets.com

 

We’re not as evolved as we think:

From Photobucket

 

Dogs helping writers?

From Jeff Stahler, dist. by UFS, Inc.

 

Just in from Jim Callan

 

Waiting for treats

Disney & Riley
Olive and Morris

 

Ready to ditch the politics and spend your days laughing at cute pet videos, memes, and pictures on social media? You’ll have no trouble finding them. Start with these:

Homer Blind WonderCat

Dog Memes

Funny Pets on YouTube

Funny Pets on Pinterest

Funny Pets on Facebook

Tell us your favorites.

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The Time My Mother Tried To Trick Me About Pixie

By Judy Penz Sheluk

I’m not sure about other professions, but most writers I know have very long memories. It’s those memories that help us fabricate stories based on past experiences, places we’ve been, and people we’ve met along the way. So when I was thinking of what to write for this blog, I went back to my childhood.

I was about six and had been pestering my parents for a pet for about as long as I could talk. At long last, my parents took me to Woolworth’s, where they bought me a green budgie. I named the budgie Hansie (I have no idea where that came from) but sadly, after one night and a body full of hives, it was quickly apparent that I was allergic to feathers. Or at least to budgies. Despite my tears and desperate pleas to keep him, Hansie was duly returned and exchanged for two goldfish.

Now, truthfully, even at six, I didn’t see a goldfish as a proper pet, but I figured if I could prove myself with fish, a puppy might be in the foreseeable future. I called my goldfish Goldie (hey, I was six) and Pixie. Everything was going along swimmingly until one day after school I noticed something odd. Pixie had gone from gold to red-gold. How was that even possible?

My first resource was my Encyclopedia Britannica (does anyone remember those?). Nowhere under Goldfish did it say they could change color. Which meant someone had replaced Pixie with an imposter. The most likely suspect was my mother, who would have been home while I was at school. But why? Surely no one would kidnap a goldfish. Would they?

I ran the idea of a goldfish kidnapping by my mother, who shamefacedly admitted that she’d found Pixie floating on top of the water that morning, and wanted to spare me the heartbreak of losing another pet. I forgave her, even after she told me Pixie had been unceremoniously flushed down the toilet. I did, however, insist on making a small grave marker out of popsicle sticks in the side garden. Pixie may have gone to that big aquarium in the sky, but at least she would be remembered.

I named the new goldfish Red, and to the best of my recollection, Red and Goldie lived a couple of years, though it could just as easily have been a couple of months. It’s hard to bond with a goldfish, you know? Especially after my mother tried to trick me about Pixie.

Find Judy’s books in print, ebook, and audio at all the usual suspects, including Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Audible, Apple Books, Kobo, and Chapters.Indigo.
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Welcome, R. L. Seago!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome author, R. L. Seago to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing. My name is R.L. Seago, and I have 6 self- published mystery/suspense novels under my belt. I live I northern California with my wife of almost 28 years, and served in the US Navy for nearly 5 years as a Hospital Corpsman

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing? My wife Anna and I have 2 Pembroke Welsh Corgi sisters, Bella Rose and Sophie Marie. They are 7 ½ and sisters from the same litter

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names? In Voices of the Passed I introduce Solomon, a bull terrier and a Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Chauncy. In Tears of the Innocent you will meet Joker, a German shepherd and his owner Ryder Raynes. They own and operate a private detective agency in Santa Barbara. In #5, There Are None So Bind, you will meet Baxter, a sight dog for a young bind woman named Cassidy. There is also Oscar the beagle cross and Angus, a black Scottish Terrier.

 What are you reading now? Currently rereading Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck 

What writing projects are you currently working on? Lucky #7 is in the creative process right now and will be a deviation in genre from my previous works.

Who is your favorite author and why? Steinbeck, Bradbury, Koontz and of course James Patterson. Oh, and a relatively new writer named Stephen King…lol

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing? I use dogs in most of my projects, and believe in giving them their own personalities, character traits and purpose in the story. I firmly believe that dogs can make a great story even better. My primary rule with digs in my writing is simple- people can die, bad things happen, but THE DOG never dies

Why do you include animals in your writing? They give us so much unconditional love and enjoyment, to not use them in our writing is almost cruel

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them. In None So Blind, Baxter a golden retriever is a sight dog for Cassidy Delgado, a former US Marine who was blinded in Afghanistan

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why? Probably Rascal by Sterling North. I read that in 5th or 6th grade, and too this day it has a place on my bookshelf

 When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know? High school on my newspaper

What do your pets do when you are writing? Sleep on our sofas, giving me their own form of support..lol

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing? How difficult it is to get a publisher to take you seriously

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why? In my office or at the beach

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer? Do it for the love of the craft, not for the money or “fame”

What is one lesson you learned about writing or publishing that you’d like to share? Perseverance and patience

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