Esther the Wonder Pig

I am enchanted with the Esther the Wonder Pig posts on Facebook (I’m not the only one; she has well over 1.3M Facebook fans and followers). I did some poking around and found Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter’s story. Many thanks to them and Esther for letting me share this with you all.

Esther, born in 2012, loves watermelons, mangoes, and Oreo cookies. Esther is smart, clever, and funny. They had to pig-proof their cabinets and refrigerator because she quickly learned how to open doors and sneak food. All of her clothes and outfits are handmade and sent to her by her fans.

Steve (a realtor), Derek (a magician), and Esther live in Georgetown, Ontario, Canada, and the story began when Steve brought home a “mini-pig” who ended up topping out at 650 lbs. She was almost 250 lbs. by her first birthday, and they were surprised to learn that Esther was a commercial pig. Even though she wasn’t the “mini” they thought she was, the pair fell in love with her. They did some research on commercial livestock. Esther changed their way of thinking and living. The pair eventually adopted the vegan life that they call “Esther Approved.”

In 2014, Steve and Derek established Happily Ever Esther Farm Sanctuary (which started as a crowd-funded effort) where they rescue and rehabilitate abandoned farm animals. Please check out the link below.

To learn more about Steve, Derek, and Esther, watch the Tedx presentation that they did in 2017.

And stop by Esther’s social media sites and websites and check out her book.

Let’s Be Social:

Website

The Esther Farm Sanctuary Store

Facebook

Twitter

Instragram

YouTube

TedX Presentation

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Cuteness: A Survival Tactic

This is Kathleen Kaska’s final post with Pens, Paws, and Claws. We’ll miss her in our regular rotation of bloggers, and we’ll hope she’ll stop by from time to time for a visit.

Do you ever wonder why most people go gaga over babies—human and otherwise?

When I was studying physical anthropology at the University of Texas, one of my professors caught slack after he said that baby animals were cute so that their mothers would take care of them. Anthropomorphism in the world of science was a big no-no back then, and still is in certain academic situations. However, recent brain research seems to support my professor’s claim.

There is a recent article in The Telegraph by Sophie Jamieson about an Oxford University study concluding babies and puppies have evolved cute characteristics as a way to survive. It goes beyond visual attributes like big eyes, chubby cheeks, and infantile giggles. Sounds and smells also stimulate the nervous system to give care to the cute. Oxford’s Department of Psychiatry Professor Morten Kringelbach led the research and said, “Infants attract us through all our senses, which helps make cuteness one of the most basic and powerful forces shaping our behaviour.” That also might be why we more often choose young animals for pets rather than older ones.

Beyond stimulating our need to nurture, owning a pet, regardless of the animal’s age, can make us healthier. It’s no secret that pets relax us when we’re stressed, but did you know there’s a scientific reason for that? Cuddling a pet releases the chemical oxytocin sometimes called “the cuddle chemical.” Oxytocin calms and soothes both the owner and the pet, which leads to a strong bond between both. That bond between dog and human is the strongest. Dogs are the only animal that consistently run to meet their owner when frightened or happy to see them. They are the only ones to make eye contact with people when they need attention, food, or protection.

Other studies show that owning a pet improves our cardio-vascular system, lowers blood pressure and cholesterol, and reduces the risk of asthma. Cuddling or petting a pet reduces the stress hormone cortisol in those who suffer from clinical depression. Dogs are also being trained to detect, usually by smell, certain diseases or malfunctions of the human body. For example, trained dogs can detect minute changes in the function of the adrenal glands of people suffering from Addison’s disease. Some can use their sense of smell to detect the development of cancer or diabetes, and others learn to detect early signs of epileptic seizures and to warn their owner.

I used to teach middle-school science before I retired. Although I loved my job, I usually left the classroom stressed. A half-hour commute home through heavy traffic added a tight knot between my shoulders. Only when I turned down my street did I begin to relax. When I looked at my front window and saw my little brown, mixed-breed hound Jenny watching for me, the tension washed away completely.

Links:

https://www.medicaldetectiondogs.org.uk/

http://www.kathleenkaska.com

http://www.blackopalbooks.com

https://twitter.com/KKaskaAuthor

http://www.facebook.com/kathleenkaska

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