Cute Pet Memes to Make You Laugh

Need a good laugh? Who doesn’t? The world‘s a troubling place.

That’s where cute pets come to the rescue. Pet your cat, dog, ferret, hamster—and enjoy them. They give us such joy, comfort, and happiness. Ever notice how they make us smile even when they’re not doing anything?

 

From Bobbi Hanson’s Pinterest board

 

But maybe you don’t/can’t have pets. Or you’re at work and the minutes to quitting time are going oh-so-slowly. Or you just can’t get enough cuteness in your life.

Enjoy a few of my favorite cute pet pictures and memes. If you’re on Facebook and/or Pinterest, you’ve probably seen some of these countless times, but they’re always good for a belly laugh.

From lolzombie.com

 

This is my Olive to a T:

From Homer Blind WonderCat

 

From Greenleafpets.com

 

We’re not as evolved as we think:

From Photobucket

 

Dogs helping writers?

From Jeff Stahler, dist. by UFS, Inc.

 

Just in from Jim Callan

 

Waiting for treats

Disney & Riley
Olive and Morris

 

Ready to ditch the politics and spend your days laughing at cute pet videos, memes, and pictures on social media? You’ll have no trouble finding them. Start with these:

Homer Blind WonderCat

Dog Memes

Funny Pets on YouTube

Funny Pets on Pinterest

Funny Pets on Facebook

Tell us your favorites.

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JAKE: Our Most Loving and Demanding Dog by Sheri Levy

 

After the death of our first rescued German shepherd, Charlie, my husband and I let our children choose a White German shepherd. Our young daughter named her, Gretchel. After Gretchel passed-on, and being avid dog lovers, we fell in love with the Australian shepherd breed.

During January, our six-month-old Aussie, Sydney, discovered his first snow storm, and he bit and pawed at the white fluff. Snow never lasted long in Greenville, S.C. so we spent the afternoon sledding. I rode our children’s red sled and Sydney chased me. Suddenly, a Black lab puppy bounced out of the woods, sat my lap, and licked my face.

Sydney barked, telling him to go away. But the Lab refused and wanted to play. Murphy and I assumed he was a neighbor’s dog. After an hour of being frozen and wet, we called Sydney and headed home.

The Lab sat and stared. His head bobbed sideways, contemplating what came next. Moments later, he raced after us. We led him into our garage, gave him water, and Murphy dried his wet body while I went in and called our neighbors. No one knew anything about this dog.

When I returned to the garage, Murphy shared. “This guy not only is skin and bones, but he has three puncture wounds. I’ll clean these bites since we’ll have to wait until the roads clear to get him to the veterinarian.

The wounds didn’t seem to bother him and he ate as if he hadn’t eaten in days. We made him a warm bed in the garage and he fell asleep. During his three days with us, he showed us his loving and relaxed personality. As the ice melted, we drove him to the Vet’s office. After we paid the Vet bills, we called him ours and named him Jake.

Jake grew to over eighty pounds and his mischievous nature began to show. After he chewed on our furniture while we worked, Jake became an outside dog within our electric fence. Sydney and Jake played like brothers, but Jake invented new ways to be destructive. Our daughter was getting married and her decorations and invitations arrived by UPS one day on the front porch.

When we arrived home, our son was picking-up the itty-biddy pieces of purple napkins and décor shredded across the front yard, and in between every plant. On other days, Jake ate the electric wires to the garage door opener, and the wires on the boat trailer. We never knew what we’d find when we returned home. Jake would play tug-a war-with our huge Azaleas, leaving gaping holes in the ground.

I had been taking Jake to dog training classes and the trainer encouraged us not to use negative ways to punish him. She talked about using balloons, popping them so he’d hear a sudden loud noise and would become afraid of balloons. Murphy blew up a balloon and popped it. I screamed. Jake watched and Sydney ran and hid.

The next step was to tape the colored-balloons inside the azaleas, the boat trailer and any electrical wires.  Our neighbors had a good laugh when they saw our colorful front yard.  Jake ignored the balloons as long as they stayed full of air. But once the air dissipated, he ripped-off the balloon and swallowed it. We’d find colored balloons around the entire yard.

Jake eventually out grew most of his mischief, and he lived to a ripe-old age of thirteen and a half. He was the funniest and most challenging dog we ever loved.

 

 

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The Time My Mother Tried To Trick Me About Pixie

By Judy Penz Sheluk

I’m not sure about other professions, but most writers I know have very long memories. It’s those memories that help us fabricate stories based on past experiences, places we’ve been, and people we’ve met along the way. So when I was thinking of what to write for this blog, I went back to my childhood.

I was about six and had been pestering my parents for a pet for about as long as I could talk. At long last, my parents took me to Woolworth’s, where they bought me a green budgie. I named the budgie Hansie (I have no idea where that came from) but sadly, after one night and a body full of hives, it was quickly apparent that I was allergic to feathers. Or at least to budgies. Despite my tears and desperate pleas to keep him, Hansie was duly returned and exchanged for two goldfish.

Now, truthfully, even at six, I didn’t see a goldfish as a proper pet, but I figured if I could prove myself with fish, a puppy might be in the foreseeable future. I called my goldfish Goldie (hey, I was six) and Pixie. Everything was going along swimmingly until one day after school I noticed something odd. Pixie had gone from gold to red-gold. How was that even possible?

My first resource was my Encyclopedia Britannica (does anyone remember those?). Nowhere under Goldfish did it say they could change color. Which meant someone had replaced Pixie with an imposter. The most likely suspect was my mother, who would have been home while I was at school. But why? Surely no one would kidnap a goldfish. Would they?

I ran the idea of a goldfish kidnapping by my mother, who shamefacedly admitted that she’d found Pixie floating on top of the water that morning, and wanted to spare me the heartbreak of losing another pet. I forgave her, even after she told me Pixie had been unceremoniously flushed down the toilet. I did, however, insist on making a small grave marker out of popsicle sticks in the side garden. Pixie may have gone to that big aquarium in the sky, but at least she would be remembered.

I named the new goldfish Red, and to the best of my recollection, Red and Goldie lived a couple of years, though it could just as easily have been a couple of months. It’s hard to bond with a goldfish, you know? Especially after my mother tried to trick me about Pixie.

Find Judy’s books in print, ebook, and audio at all the usual suspects, including Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Audible, Apple Books, Kobo, and Chapters.Indigo.
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Welcome, R. L. Seago!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome author, R. L. Seago to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing. My name is R.L. Seago, and I have 6 self- published mystery/suspense novels under my belt. I live I northern California with my wife of almost 28 years, and served in the US Navy for nearly 5 years as a Hospital Corpsman

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing? My wife Anna and I have 2 Pembroke Welsh Corgi sisters, Bella Rose and Sophie Marie. They are 7 ½ and sisters from the same litter

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names? In Voices of the Passed I introduce Solomon, a bull terrier and a Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Chauncy. In Tears of the Innocent you will meet Joker, a German shepherd and his owner Ryder Raynes. They own and operate a private detective agency in Santa Barbara. In #5, There Are None So Bind, you will meet Baxter, a sight dog for a young bind woman named Cassidy. There is also Oscar the beagle cross and Angus, a black Scottish Terrier.

 What are you reading now? Currently rereading Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck 

What writing projects are you currently working on? Lucky #7 is in the creative process right now and will be a deviation in genre from my previous works.

Who is your favorite author and why? Steinbeck, Bradbury, Koontz and of course James Patterson. Oh, and a relatively new writer named Stephen King…lol

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing? I use dogs in most of my projects, and believe in giving them their own personalities, character traits and purpose in the story. I firmly believe that dogs can make a great story even better. My primary rule with digs in my writing is simple- people can die, bad things happen, but THE DOG never dies

Why do you include animals in your writing? They give us so much unconditional love and enjoyment, to not use them in our writing is almost cruel

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them. In None So Blind, Baxter a golden retriever is a sight dog for Cassidy Delgado, a former US Marine who was blinded in Afghanistan

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why? Probably Rascal by Sterling North. I read that in 5th or 6th grade, and too this day it has a place on my bookshelf

 When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know? High school on my newspaper

What do your pets do when you are writing? Sleep on our sofas, giving me their own form of support..lol

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing? How difficult it is to get a publisher to take you seriously

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why? In my office or at the beach

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer? Do it for the love of the craft, not for the money or “fame”

What is one lesson you learned about writing or publishing that you’d like to share? Perseverance and patience

Let’s Be Social:

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Support Dogs for Writers by K.B. Inglee

Are there support dogs for Writers? You becha. They should have vests for dogs who belong to writers.

We have some friends whose house was destroyed in the floods in the Carolinas. They, along with their dogs, are now living with relatives not far from us.  They are crowded in and one of the dogs had to go until they get settled in a new home. We agreed to take Flash, a dachshund (maybe) mix.

Now, I already had a dog, Wendigo, who would turn 13 in June. How would Flash get on with Wendy?

She had moved in with us when she was a year and a half, after her show dog career crashed. She didn’t get on well with other dogs. I was a bit anxious when Flash arrived. But it was love at first sight. That was a surprise. They hung out together and Flash looked like a dog in love.

Wendy had just been diagnosed with liver cancer and needed to be put down soon. I hoped having another dog around would help me when I could no longer grab a hand full of soft white fur or snuggle a small warm body while falling asleep.

Flash came on Monday and we had Wendy put down on Wednesday. I tossed her collar and tags on the chair next to my writing spot. Flash promptly added her collar to his stash of toys. Wendy wasn’t much for toys, but Flash loves them. Under the sofa he found one of her rawhide rings. I considered snatching it ways but turns out he just wants to catch it, not chew on it. He doesn’t play with the collar, but he won’t let me take it away, either.

He had been sleeping in his crate, went in unasked, and stayed watching the goings on in the house. The day after Wendy’s death, he pulled the blanket out of the crate and put it near my feet at my writing station. A few minutes later he pulled his bed out of the crate and put it on top of the blanket. That night he took her spot on my bed.

I’ve never had a dog that was the least bit interested in my writing. I’d open the computer Wendy would toss me a look like “You are doing that again?” She would curl up on the sofa and start snoring.

Now Flash sleeps near my feet as I write, and any time I need inspiration all I have to do is reach over and fondle his very soft brown ears. We talk about sentence structure, character development, if a blog would be interesting or boring, and how to contact experts for advice. His silence gives me plenty of room to think about what I am doing.

What a wonderful dog. I will miss him when he has to go to his new home. Then I will have no dogs.

About K.B. Inglee

KB Inglee works as an interpreter at old mills in Pennsylvania and Delaware. The sheep she tends for one of the sites provides wool for her knitting and spinning. Her short stories are set in America from the Colonial period until the turn of the 20th century. She is a member of Sisters in Crime, Delaware Valley Sisters in Crime and the Guppies.

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Snow Books, Snow Dogs and Recharging the Batteries!

Sometimes, when it snows, you need to stop shoveling, stop worrying and just curl up with a hot cup of cocoa/tea/coffee and a damn good book. Right? It’s one of the best ways ever of totally recharging your life, your writing batteries, and your whole soul.

Earlier in the month we had a good snow here in DC. It was supposed to only be six inches, not that much,  considering it came early in the day.  The plows would be able to take care of that, I thought. Not a problem.  There would be school for the kids the next day, of course, because hey…not that much snow, right?

Wrong!

We did get 6″…then it stopped snowing and the plows came through. I kept my usual schedule because, as I said, there would be school and work and everything because this was a small snow.  Very pretty, but not a problem.

Then it started to flurry again.  Then to actively snow.  There were points when it was almost blizzard-y in the sheer volume of snow coming down.  We got just over a foot of snow, when it was all said and done.

So much for all that shoveling I’d already done!

It was still relatively early in the day as this second half of the storm hit. Only about 6 pm when I realized that we were going to get a LOT more snow than they’d predicted.  I also realized there would not be school the next day.  Probably not much getting out and about, either.  Not till at least mid-afternoon from our neighborhood anyway.

My sons were ecstatic. No school.  With just as much glee, I realized I could take a “me-day” – a reading, sleeping, catching up, fun day.  Sure, I’d have to help shovel at some point (we have some older neighbors we do for, plus our own stuff) BUT…

I could take a whole morning. Just. To. Read. 

Ahhhhhhh!

Now, don’t get me wrong, I read all the time.  As a writer you HAVE to read.  You just have to.  You lose your creative edge if you don’t “fill the well” with great stories.  At one point in my writing career, life got complicated and I didn’t read much.  It sucked.  It got harder and harder to write.  The less I read, the more I felt like I  couldn’t tell good stories.  I didn’t feel the spark of story-ness in my soul and it was like slogging through cold molasses to get words on the page.

I will never do that again.  It was torture!

So, now I read a lot. Sometimes it’s research stuff, sometimes it’s Science Fiction, Fantasy, YA, or books I’m judging for contests. (I’m about to start my RITA Award reads – SO Excited!) Sometimes its revisiting old favorites in every genre. A good read never fails to stimulate my mind, engage my senses, and take me on a journey to the most fascinating places.

On this lovely snowy day, I managed to visit some amazing places! From 1820’s London (A friend’s manuscript draft) to the modern-day UK, including York and London (Nancy Northcott’s The Deathbrew Affair), I stole away for about five hours.  Soooo wonderful!

The DH, our boys, and I got out and played in the snow – a moral imperative! – made snow cream, and then got down to the business of shoveling out a little before total dark set in.  Since we’d already cleared after the first dollop of snow, it was pretty easy!  As darkness fell, we went back to playing with the dogs.  For those of you who have them, do yours chase snowballs?  Ours do! Then they look super surprised when the “ball” disappears into the snow on the ground! Where’d it go? It’s hilarious.

We all finally tromped back in, had soup and grilled cheese – YUM! – and settled in for the night.  The DH opted for a movie in the living room. The boys headed to the basement man-cave for some video gaming. Me? I headed to the big cozy chair by the fireplace with a massive mug of Constant Comment tea, a plate of apple slices, cheese and crackers, and a re-read of Nora Roberts’ Shelter In Place.

The next day, I snuggled in bed with yet another fabulous read, Sue Coletta’s Wings of Mayhem – SO GOOD! I’ve gotten to know Sue via her fabulously informative writers blog, and on social media. Such a fab writer and a generous social media presence as well! That can also be said about the author of my late afternoon reading choice, Jordan Dane.  Got her The Last Victim, the first in her Ryker Townsend series. Also riveting.

SUCH a great reading day, snow day, and dog fun day.  After playing for hours in the snow, the dogs were worn out enough to curl up with me in the reading chair and on the ottoman.  I was pretty much cocooned with dog fur. They snored and I read.  Same thing the next day. We played and shoveled, then they snored and I read.

When the next day dawned, with school for the kids and the DH off to work, it was back to the regular routine for the most part.  However, I came to the day relaxed and refreshed because I’d been on a book vacation.  While there was heart-pounding tension, it wasn’t work related, it was story related.  What a joy.

So I know that a lot of people dislike snow, but I find that I’m longing for another snow day, another day to just dream, read, and sip tea by the fire.

What about you?

Do you like snow?

What’s your drink of choice while reading?  I love hot tea, but it frequently goes cold when I get so involved in the book and forget to drink it!

Have you had a good snow-day-reading-day yet this winter?

Fill me in!

(The lovely teacup/book graphic is from Pinterest but was unsigned. No copyright infringement intended and the work is that of the artist, not mine.  All other photos are mine.)

The Labs – Daisy and Dakota – are mine, as is the imminently silly Irish Water Spaniel, Tucker. The dachshund, Coco, belongs to my dear friend Sophia Nash. If you haven’t read her Whispering In French, you are missing a treat. (It got a coveted starred review in Publisher’s Weekly!)

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3 Things to Do Before Bringing Home Your First Pet by Jessica Brody

Please welcome Jessica Brody to Pens, Paws, and Claws. She’s our guest blogger this weekend about bringing home your first pet.

Becoming a pet owner is one of the most rewarding things you can do. Dogs and cats are especially lovely creatures, providing endless companionship and unconditional love. Of course, caring for another life comes with its fair share of hefty responsibilities — there are several things that need to be done before you even bring them home! Check out these preparation tips so you can ensure the successful adoption and a happy life with your new friend.

 Research Pet Types Carefully

 Try not to fall for the first adorable pet that catches your eye. It’s important that your lifestyle meets the needs of the particular animal or breed you choose, so do your research before making a decision. To start, you’ll want to consider a few important questions.

        How much space do you have in your home and yard?

       Can you handle pet hair, unpleasant messes, and possible damage to your belongings?

       Do you have any allergies?

       How much time do you have to spend playing with and training a pet?

       What activities do you intend to do with them?

       Do you have the financial stability to support veterinary bills?

 Some dog breeds, like Shih Tzus, are better suited for apartment living and owners who work long hours. Others, like Dalmatians, love to exercise and are great companions for avid runners or hikers. In general, cats require less attention than dogs and tend to fit into various living situations, though they will still need space to roam around. If you just don’t have much room at all, aim for something in a cage or tank, like a fish.

 Get Your Home Ready

 Pets aren’t all fun and games — they’re a lot of work, too! Prepare your home ahead of time so you can keep up with the cleaning and avoid accidents. If you’re getting a cat, remember that litter boxes need to be cleaned on a daily basis. Consider investing in a self-cleaning litter box to make this task a little easier. Find the best options by checking out reviews on Cat Life Today.

 If you’re getting a puppy, look into comfortable crates and puppy pads to cut down on messy accidents during house training. No matter how careful you are, your pup is bound to have a few accidents inside. So, be prepared with cleaning products that prevent odors and stains from setting into your carpets or upholstery. You’ll also want to stock up on toys to keep your pet from unleashing their playful energy on your belongings. Dogster recommends pet-proofing your home with baby gates to keep your curious animals from exploring dangerous areas.

 Prepare a Gentle Welcome

Animals are very sensitive to change and can be uneasy in a new home for a few days. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to make your pet more comfortable. Cats are territorial and will benefit from a personal area, such as a laundry room or bathroom, where they can be alone now and again. Petfinder suggests creating a small enclosure in this area where your cat can hide away. You can purchase a covered cat bed for this or make your own hideaway by cutting a doorway out of a cardboard box.

 Rescue pets coming from the shelter may be even more nervous or scared in a new home. Give them space to explore your house and try to reduce the number of new people they meet during the first week or so. You’ll also want to stay close by to encourage your pet to bond with you and help them feel safe for their first days. Schedule your adoption on the weekend so you can spend two to three days with them. Additionally, start your obedience training from day one to establish mutual respect and dependability between you and your pet as soon as possible.

 Owning a pet for the first time may be a bit scary, but you’ll quickly see why the majority of people consider their pets members of the family. Although they require a lot of time and money, they pay us back by increasing our happiness, encouraging us to exercise, reducing our stress, and providing endless support throughout our lives.

About Jessica Brody

I am a dog lover and creator of OurBestFriends.pet. I created the site to offer a place for animal lovers to share their favorite pet photos and stories about their furry pals. I believe dogs are the best creatures on earth. I enjoy writing about and sharing photos of dogs (and other pets!) on my website.

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Cat-Lovin’ Men

The perfect stocking stuffer! That’s what I thought when I spotted Of Cats and Men: Profiles of History’s Great Cat-Loving Artists, Writers, Thinkers, and Statesmen at the intimate and atmospheric Fountain Bookstore, tucked in the heart of Richmond, Virginia’s historic Shockoe Slip district. I had the perfect person in mind for this charming volume: my cat-lovin’ husband.

In Of Cats and Men, author Sam Kalda entertains with amusing profiles and quotes from history’s most famous “cat men.” King Hywel the Good, Sultan Baibars, Sir Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, Edward Lear, Mark Twain, Nikola Tesla, Sir Winston Churchill, T.S. Eliot, Paul Klee, Raymond Chandler, George Balanchine, Jean Cocteau, Ernest Hemingway, Balthus, Romare Bearden, William S. Burroughs, Saul Steinberg, Charles Bukowski, Marlon Brando, Edward Gorey, Andy Warhol, Haruki Muraakami, and Al Weiwei are just a few Mr. Kalda has included.

Now I knew that Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, and Raymond Chandler loved their cats. But Nikola Tesla, Marlon Brando, and Charles Bukowski? I had no idea. And, at the risk of revealing my cultural ignorance, I wasn’t familiar with many of the names profiled.

Nikola Tesla and cat
Marlon Brando and cat
Charles Bukowski writing a love letter to his cat.

Sam Kalda features feline-inspired quotes:

“I have my favorite cat, who is also my paperweight, on my desk while I am writing.” – Ray Bradbury

“What greater love than the love of a cat?” – Charles Dickens

“A cat has absolute emotional honesty: human beings, for one reason or another, may hide their feelings, but a cat does not.” – Ernest Hemingway.

∞∞∞

Edgar Allan Poe and his beloved tortoiseshell cat, Catterina, are not included in this volume. Neither are the Viennese painter, Gustav Klimt and his cat, Katze. In Klimt and His Cat (Berenice Capatti, author and Octavia Monaco, Illustrator)Katze narrates, giving readers a glimpse into the painter’s world.

Edgar Allan Poe with Catterina. From Poe Museum collection
Gustave Klimt with Katze. theonlinephotographer.typepad.com

I’m late with Christmas gift ideas, but gift giving is a year-round pleasure. Give your favorite cat-lovin’ man a copy of Of Cats and Men. He’ll appreciate the great company he’s in!

Note: women will love Of Cats and Men as well.

Here’s Glen, my cat-lovin’ man, with Olive and Morris:

Glen and Olive
Morris and Glen go online

Support your local bookstore. Or, Richmond’s Fountain Bookstore will ship your copy:

Of Cats and Men: Profiles of History’s Great Cat-Loving Artists, Writers, Thinkers, and Statesmen

Klimt and His Cat

∞∞∞

Maggie King is the author of the Hazel Rose Book Group mysteries, including Murder at the Book Group and Murder at the Moonshine Inn. She has contributed stories to the Virginia is for Mysteries anthologies and to the 50 Shades of Cabernet anthology.

Maggie is a member of Sisters in Crime, James River Writers, and the American Association of University Women. She has worked as a software developer, retail sales manager, and customer service supervisor. Maggie graduated from Elizabeth Seton College and earned a B.S. degree in Business Administration from Rochester Institute of Technology. She has called New Jersey, Massachusetts, and California home. These days she lives in Richmond, Virginia with her husband, Glen, and cats, Morris and Olive. She enjoys reading, walking, movies, traveling, theatre, and museums.

Website: http://www.maggieking.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MaggieKingAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaggieKingAuthr

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/authormaggieking

Amazon author page: http://amzn.to/2Bj4uIL

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The Dogs in My Life: Part V —Gibbs

We’ve finally reached the part of this series where I tell you about the current dog in my life, and let me tell you, he’s been anxious to tell his story. So this time, I’m going to let Gibbs do the talking:

Gibbs reporting in. That’s my little joke because I was named after Leroy Jethro Gibbs on the TV show, NCIS. He’s a U.S. Marine (get it…reporting in…) and Judy and Mike love that show. Plus the Marine’s motto is Semper Fi, which means “Always Faithful,” and that is also my motto!

I have another name, too. It’s my Canadian Kennel Club name, Maplelane’s The Power of Love. I know, it’s embarrassing, but let me explain. You see, I was born on October 15, 2015 on Back to the Future Day, and all the Maplelane puppies in my litter had to have a name that referenced the movie. The Power of Love is the movie’s theme song.

I came to live with Judy and Mike on December 6, 2015. I’ll admit that I was a somewhat challenging puppy (though you must admit I was very cute). There was that time I chewed a hunk out of the wall while Judy was brushing her teeth. And the time I stole her bathmat and dragged it into the living room while she was in the shower. And then there was the time I shredded her Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine before she had a chance to read it. But hey, nobody’s perfect, right?

My favorite things to do are: Go for a walk, play fetch with my purple ball, sleeping under Judy’s desk when she writes, watching the sunset at our camp on Lake Superior, and swimming. I LOVE swimming. And my favorite person? Judy, of course. But don’t tell Mike. Some things are better kept a secret. 

Love, Gibbs

PS: Be sure to check out my WEDNESDAY WAGGLES posts on Judy’s Facebook page!

PPS: You can find her books at all the usual suspects, including Amazon, Kobo and Barnes & Noble. She tells me books make great stocking stuffers. I personally think a bone is much better!

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Welcome, Rosemary Shomaker


Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome author Rosemary Shomaker to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Hi, I’m Rosie Shomaker. I’ve always liked writing stories, but I spent my professional life analyzing data and writing non-fiction policy reports and summaries. Now I’m free to write what I want to write. I’m as yet fairly undisciplined, though, but once I commit to a project, I focus my energy.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Mary and Carmen are the main dog characters in “This is Not a Dog Park,” one of the To Fetch a Thief novellas. Mary is a sheprador and Carmen is a fluffy white dog. In a subsequent story I’ll have to define Carmen’s breed. She’s owned by a stuffy rich lady in the story, so that dog has great mystery possibilities. Carmen and her owner live in a well-to-do neighborhood near a park that is central to the story. Mary the sheprador helps her owner Adam leave behind a life of disquietude.

What are you reading now?

I am reading several Nevada Barr novels. She had varied jobs and did summer work as in the national parks. Her main character, Anna Pidgeon, is a national park ranger. The Rope and Destroyer Angel were riveting. Barr comes off as a bit of a misandrist in her stories, in my opinion, and notwithstanding my feminist tendencies, her treatment of male characters can be harsh . . . although I admit the plot and character development rings sound. The adventure in these stories is great! When I need less adrenaline and more historical escape, I default to Charles Todd and Jacqueline Winspear mystery books.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

It seems so natural to include pets in a setting. So many readers live with pets. Pets can be used as a good character sounding board in stories; human-pet interaction and dialogue are straight lines to the human character’s psyche. Animals also can be used to move the plot along, change pace, and provide humor. I haven’t worked much yet with using animals to ratchet up tension. I’ll have to explore that.

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

This is a real possibility for my next story. Aren’t all pets service animals in a way—since they are usually emotional support animals for most of us? I was intrigued when I read Jodi Picoult’s My Sister’s Keeper and met Campbell Alexander’s dog Judge. Judge helps warn Alexander of approaching epileptic seizures. Wow. Also, a local writer has shared her experiences with her own family dog that could indicate her daughter’s diabetic crises. The working nature of a dog can give real service to humans. I’ve also been introduced to police dogs and search and rescue dogs, and I admire the training and work of those canines. So much tension and conflict could be shown in stories featuring that type of dog in a criminal situation. I like the idea of a service dog, maybe a hearing dog that is specially trained to help people who are deaf or have hearing loss. Hearing dogs can alert their humans to sounds around the home and in public. I can see working that type of service dog into a story, too.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

One day I’ll read a college thesis written about Charlotte of E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web. What a story! Even as a child I regarded Charlotte as a complex character. Cool to think that college theses have been written about her. As I child I was more of a Wilbur-type character who could not appreciate all there was to Charlotte, especially in their early relationship. I think I knew some Charlottes in my time. Now that I am older, I guess I am a Charlotte.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

My pup spends his time a room away from me when I write. He comes in occasionally to remind me to stop, drink some water, eat, and go outside. Well, he wants to do those things, and he provides the example that gets me out of my obsessive writing state. If not for my pup, I’d disregard most everything once I was on a roll and fixated on writing. Sometimes I’ll put him off and try to ignore him but he won’t ignore me, and soon his sad eyes are right at my hip level and hard to overlook.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

I found a very old copy of James Fenimore Cooper’s The Prairie, circa 1900. I love Cooper. I feel right in the forest with his characters! The Prairie takes place not in New England forests but in the Midwest during America’s westward expansion. I’ve an idea for a novel set in the great plains, and I’m hoping Cooper’s book fills in some of the dramatic sentiment I need to spur me on to write more of my story. I have TBR piles in several rooms of my house. Some are piles of magazines or local newspapers. Others are piles of books that have come my way that I am not really set on reading. I let the piles accumulate, and when I have not made a move to read anything in a pile in a few weeks, I clear out the items to the recycle bin or the giveaway box.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

My son found a very large beetle (two and one half inches long) when he was about five years old—my son’s age—not the beetle’s. They kinda bonded in a strange way. The beetle seemed happy to have a caretaker. My son made him a home in his room: a tray with water, grass and leaves for habitat, and who knows what for food? We most likely looked up what beetles ate. Mr. Beetle lived as a pet with us for four days. He’d sit on my son’s shoulder and even on his cheek when my son lay down. Mr. Beetle didn’t move much or very fast, and my husband and I hypothesized he was an old beetle, hopefully not a sick beetle. My son left on a short trip, maybe a cub scout trip, with my husband, and Mr. Beetle did not live to see my son again. A month or two later, my son found another beetle while playing in a friend’s yard. This new beetle wasn’t so nice. He stung my son! That ended my son’s interactions with beetles. My son’s entomology career, down the tubes.

Where is your favorite place to read (or write)? Why?

My favorite place to read is outside on my deck, or even outside in a park. I like to have my legs raised while seated to read. The fresh air and natural light enlivens my soul. If I cannot be outside, I like to read sitting longways on the couch by our big front window. Inside I like to have a big cup of coffee at hand while I read. Outside, my drink of choice is water.

About Rosemary

Rosemary Shomaker was born in Maine and grew up with family—and heartstring—ties to New England. She currently lives in Virginia, and after a state government career now writes fiction. You can find a few of her short stories in anthologies such as Virginia is for Mysteries – Volumes I and II, 50 Shades of Cabernet, and several of the Shaker of Margaritas anthologies. Her “This is Not a Dog Park” novella is included in the Mutt Mysteries collection To Fetch a Thief.

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