Welcome, Laura Vorreyer!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Laura Vorreyer and Dexter to the blog!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Hello. Thanks so much for stopping by and getting to know a little about me.

My book, The Pet Sitter’s Tale, is my first book; it’s based on my 15 years as a professional pet sitter and dog walker in Hollywood, California. I was inspired to write  the book by my many friends and acquaintances that heard my wild and unbelievable pet sitting stories and said to me, “I can’t believe it, you should write a book.” And so, I did.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

My dog, Dexter, is featured prominently in my book. Dexter is my canine-soul mate. I  recued him when he was just a puppy. He had been thrown out of an apartment window  and run over by a car. I adopted him sight unseen and never regretted it for a minute.  Dexter has been with me through thick and thin, for better and for worse and takes up  residence in the office with me when I’m writing. He often sits under my desk and is a great sounding board for ideas and yes, for snacking inspiration.

My book is collection of stories and in my story entitled, “I Confess” I talk about loving  Dexter more than the person I was in a relationship with at the time. Many women have told me that they can relate to this story.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

A script. My desire is that my book will be made into a major motion picture. (Isn’t it everybody’s?) Even so, currently I am working on a script for the screen adaptation of  The Pet Sitter’s Tale and a children’s book, which is a new concept, altogether. A black Labrador named Leo inspires the children’s book. I used to regularly walk Leo for a client. The client lived in a wonderful neighborhood full of lush greenery and beautifully landscaped gardens. Walking Leo inspired me to write a children’s book about a dog-named Leo that becomes a protector of the Earth and a role model for children.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

Ginger was my first dog. I write about her extensively in the beginning of my book. She was my first love and best friend. Coincidentally, Ginger was also a black Labrador. I’ve always felt that people gravitate towards the types of pets they had as children and I’m no different. Even though Dexter is a Chi-weenie, I would love to have a Black Labrador. My second dog growing up was a black Lab; too, his name was King. King also made it into my book. I believe it was when I was a child that my love of dogs was developed. I was quite isolated growing up and created an entire world where just my dog and me existed.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Animals are mentioned in every single story in my book. Sometimes they are the main character of the story and other times they are not. Having been a pet sitter for so long, I often think of the animals as the main characters, each with their own voice and personality.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

I got some great advice once and that was, write what you know. Well, I know animals, after fifteen years a s a professional pet sitter I’ve become a pet expert.

I been fortunate to observe the role of the pet in a family’s life and seen first hand how a pet can become so much more than just an animal living in the house. Amongst its humans. I include animals in my writing because without them, I’d have nothing to write about.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

I find that many movies, which feature animals, are too sad to watch because the animal   usually dies at the end of the movie. (I hate when that happens!) I love, Ace Ventura, Pet Detective I especially love the scene when Ace is hiding all the pets in his apartment and the landlord comes over, I have definitely been there. I love that movie. The one book that stands out in my mind as having an animal as the central character is, The Art of Racing in the Rain. By Garth Stein. In this book, the narrator was Enzo the dog. What a great book. I think this is the first time I read a book and thought that the perspective of the animal was captured really well and also the dog was so completely loveable in his innocence and loyalty. What a treasure!

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

It’s in my book; you’ll have to read it. Begins on page 102

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

When I was a little girl. I loved to write. I would send long letters, keep journals and enter writing contest (especially poetry) every chance I’d get. As I got older, writing became too much of a time commitment and I stopped writing for the pure joy of it. Instead I became an avid reader and devoured tons of books. About ten years ago I started writing again and haven’t stopped.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

To vacation in Italy. Not just for a few days but for a few weeks or maybe even more. I would love to spend time in Venice, Italy. This has been a dream destination of mine forever, as long as I can remember. My relatives on my Father’s side are from Sicily so I would love to spend some time in Sicily, too. Put me down for a few months in Italy and I’m good.

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

First, don’t compare yourself to other writers. You can be inspired by them, motivated by them and encouraged by them but don’t try and be like them. Copying someone else’s writing style will not guarantee success. Remember, their good writing does not take away from your good writing. Remain true to your own voice. Write the best you can for you. There is a big enough reading audience out there for everyone to have a fan base.

It’s all right to be jealous of someone else’s success, just don’t act on it.

Secondly, have compassion for yourself and for others. Don’t beat yourself up if you don’t wake up every morning and pound out 2,500 words before you’ve even had your first cup of coffee. It’s okay. Do the best that you can and enjoy the journey!

About Laura

Laura Vorreyer is an entrepreneur, who pioneered the dog walking industry in Hollywood over 15 years ago, and is the author of the new book, “The Pet Sitter’s Tale.” She is the owner of the pet care company Your Dog’s Best Friend, a premier dog walking and pet-sitting business in Los Angeles. Laura has taught pet-sitting and dog walking classes in Los Angeles and is also a passionate advocate for animal rights. She remains dedicated to pet rescue.

 Laura’s road to pet-sitting began when she packed up her belongings and moved from Chicago to Los Angeles with dreams of becoming a make-up artist for big-time movie stars. Rather than dabbing powder on the pert noses of up-and-coming starlets, she found herself without a union card (something she didn’t know she needed for a career as a make-up artist) and, therefore, couldn’t find work. Moreover, it seemed as if everybody she met was a make-up artist. “There were more make-up artists than actresses in Los Angeles!” she quipped.

 Before she knew it, in order to just get her foot in that coveted door, she was heading to the set of a seedy adult film to apply make-up in ways she never – ever – expected. It was at this point she started to question her choice in career paths. A chance meeting on the set of a legitimate film led to a life-changing conversation. A well-known comedienne happened to need a dog walker and since Laura loves dogs, her career showering pets with love and care was born.

 Never dull, sometimes hilarious and occasionally terribly sad, Laura found that her career of looking after the rich and famous’ furry family members was captivating enough for a book. Recognizing this, she got a good chunk of her anecdotes down on paper and produced what is a combination of the books “The Nanny Diaries” and “The Devil Wears Prada” with the can-do spirit of the film “Legally Blonde.” “The Pet Sitter’s Tale” is funny, inspiring and relatable to anyone who has ever loved an animal. About her path to her career, Laura explains, “I have been many other things, but none as satisfying or rewarding as a caretaker for other living creatures.” Anybody who has loved a four-legged furry family member can relate and will laugh and cry along with Laura’s compilation of stories of her 15 years in the pet care business.

 

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Welcome, Debra Sennefelder!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Debra Sennefelder to the blog. Congratulations on your new release!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Born and raised in New York City, I now live in Connecticut with my family which includes two slightly spoiled Shih-Tzus, Susie and Billy. They are my writing companions, though they sleep a lot on the job. When I’m not writing I love to bake, hang with the pups, read or exercise. Over the years I’ve worked in pre-hospital care, retail and publishing. Currently I’m writing full-time. I write two mystery series, The Food Blogger Mystery series and the Kelly Quinn Mystery series.

 Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

Susie and Billy are the only pets we have now. Susie is 14 years old and Billy is 13 years old. Susie is full of life. She loves to walk and meet people. She gets miffed when someone doesn’t pay attention to her. She’s so funny. She loves a good game of tug of war and she loves to roll around on the grass. Billy has lost his sight due to genetic condition so he’s not as playful these days, but he enjoys walking outdoors and he’s never too far from me.  He’s a little trooper. Over the years we’ve had pet ducks, 9 in total. We got them as ducklings and raised them and at one point 2 of them needed to recuperate (one had a broken leg and the other had an infection) so they had to live in our house. That was an interesting period of time. The cat, we had Howard for 14 years, was not amused by the ducks. We’ve also had two Prairie Dogs, awesome pets by the way, and a hedgehog we rescued. Her name was Tiggy. Sadly, she’d been sick and died eleven months after we took her in. Right now the only pet that is a model in my writing is Howard. He appears in the Kelly Quinn books. He was a friendly, orange cat that liked to cuddle. It’s been 14 years since he’s passed so I’m able to write about him. I’ve chosen not to include Susie and Billy in any books at this time, perhaps in the future.

 Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

In The Uninvited Corpse there are two dogs. Bigelow is on the cover of the book and he’s a charmer with bad manners. Bigelow is a Beagle so he’s very friendly and playful and a handful. Buddy is a Golden Retriever who lives down the street from Hope Early and visits during his long walks with his owner. Howard is an orange cat that will be in the Kelly Quinn books.

 What are you reading now?

I’m always working my way through my massive TBR list. I’m reading I Know What You Bid Last Summer, a Sarah Winston Garage Sale Mystery, by Sherry Harris.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

 ’m working on the third book in the Food Blogger Mystery series. The second book, The Hidden Corpse, will be available in early 2019. I’ve also just submitted the first book in The Kelly Quinn mystery series to my editor. The title of that book hasn’t been confirmed yet.

Who is your favorite author and why?

That’s a difficult question to answer. I have so many favorite authors. I have a bunch of authors who are an automatic buy, when they have a new book I’m preordering it. Those authors include Sherry Harris, V.M. Burns, Katherine Hall Page, Bethany Blake, Krista Davis, Jenn McKinlay, Ellie Ashe.

 Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

Growing up we had a German Shepard named Lady and a cat named Tiger. Lady was sweet and she was very protective. Tiger only liked my mother. I remember a lot of hissing from her. When I was a teenager we got another dog, a Doberman Pinscher named Coffee, she was a rescue and incredibly lovable.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

When Susie was a year old we decided to get another dog and we brought Billy home. They immediately took to each other and played for 3 days straight. It was like one long play date and then they started to settle down. But the playing continued. One day I found Susie barking at the carrier. She never liked the carrier, still doesn’t, but Billy liked it and would go in there to sleep. She was barking so loud for a couple of minutes I went to look in the carrier. I found Billy had stashed all of the toys Susie played with inside the carrier. I think he figured out Susie wouldn’t go in there. Then one afternoon Susie raced into the living room with Billy following after her, she had a toy Billy was playing with in her mouth, she stopped by the sofa and tossed it up there. Billy tried to get up on the sofa, but he was too small to jump up. Hmm…I think she knew that.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

That’s easy. I want to go Costa Rica to visit the sloth sanctuary. I think they’re so adorable.

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

They sleep while I’m writing. They each have a bed in the study and that’s where they spend most of their days. If the weather is nice and the windows are open, Susie is perched on the back of the sofa with her face practically pressed against the screen.

Debra’s Biography:

Debra Sennefelder is an avid reader who reads across a range of genres, but mystery fiction is her obsession. Her interest in people and relationships is channeled into her novels against a backdrop of crime and mystery. When she’s not reading, she enjoys cooking and baking and as a former food blogger, she is constantly taking photographs of her food. Yeah, she’s that person.

Born and raised in New York City, she now lives and Connecticut with her family. She’s worked in pre-hospital care, retail and publishing. Her writing companions are her adorable and slightly spoiled Shih-Tzus, Susie and Billy.

She is a member of Sisters in Crime and Romance Writers of America. She can be reached at Debra@DebraSennefelder.com

 Let’s Be Social:

Links – Website – http://debrasennefelder.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/DebraSennefelderAuthor/

 

 

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Teresa Inge Interviews Gwen Taylor about her Volunteer Work at For the Love of Poodles

This week, Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Gwen Taylor. Teresa Inge interviews her about her volunteer work with For the Love of Poodles.

Tell us about yourself.
My name is Gwen Taylor and I am a plastic surgery nurse and a huge dog lover. I grew up in Hanover County, Virginia. I had a Jack Russell Terrier for nearly 17 years. His name was Emmitt and he was the love of my life.

Are you involved with any animal organizations or do volunteer work?
I am a foster mom and volunteer for the small non-profit name organization, For The Love of Poodles. We are based out of Richmond, Virginia and rescue small dogs.

Ever foster or adopt any pets?
I have fostered 6 dogs.  Recently, I adopted Mickey a 5 year old shih tzu. The sixth adopted dog is Figaro.

What is your funniest pet story?
Just last night I stopped and got a box of KFC chicken after work. When I got home, I put my plate on the coffee table and went to the kitchen for my glass of tea. When I returned, Figaro my #6 foster dog, a 10 pound poodle/shih tzu mix had jumped on the table and had a chicken leg in his mouth. Which by the way looked like a dinosaur leg in his tiny mouth. Mickey was under the table waiting to share in on the delicious food.

Anything else you would like to share?
The loss of a lifetime companion truly broke my heart. But volunteering For The Love of Poodles and being a foster mom is very healing. Please remember, adopt don’t shop for a pet.

For the Love of Poodles – Facebook

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Welcome, Kristen Jackson!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I live in Pennsylvania with my husband, two grown sons, and three large-breed dogs. I love to read, write, and spend time with my family at our small cabin in the Pocono mountains. A creek runs right through the yard, and the dogs love going there on the weekends as much as the humans do. I find this setting the perfect place for writing. I leave my worries and responsibilities at home so my mind is clear for the story.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing? 

I have three large-breed dogs. Koda is a Bernese mountain dog, Sophie is a landseer Newfoundland, and Chewie is a Saint Bernese (Bernese mountain dog/Saint Bernard mix.) They’re the best! They are always models for dogs in my writing! Though my upcoming Februay 1st release does not have a dog in it because of the logistics of dimension travel, I’ve written several stories that do include dogs. The very first novel I ever wrote was a middle grade fiction book called SNOW DOG, though it is unpublished. In my current work in progress, I introduce two dog characters, and though they are different breeds than my three, I use the personalities of my dogs to base my canine characters after.

 

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

In SNOW DOG, I introduce a canine character named Bacon. He’s a large-breed mix. A rescue dog, he’s very introverted…until the main character wins him over with – you guessed it – bacon! My current work in progress, BENEATH THE WAVES, has two dogs in it. A very comical and stubborn senior bulldog named Rufus, and another rescue mix named Crash. Crash plays a central role in the story … but I don’t want to give anything away!

What are you reading now?

I am currently reading a young adult novel: ‘The Scorching’ by Libbi Duncan.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

An adult sci-fi/fantasy novel entitled BENEATH THE WAVES. The story takes place in Cape Cod, where strange shiny objects are washing up on the beaches. A school teacher finds one of the objects, and calls it a trinket. A gamer’s dog finds the same thing, and he wears it on his collar. A marine biologist finds the same type of object lodged in the mouth of a great white shark she is tracking, and a retired police officer has had one for years, and calls it his good luck charm. What will happen when these strangers find each other, and the secret power of these small discoveries is revealed?

Who is your favorite author and why?

Nora Roberts. She’s my favorite because I can’t put her books down until I finish them! I always say she could write about dirt and make it interesting…

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

I had hamsters all my life, but I always knew I wanted a dog. Finally, after years of pestering, my parents gave in and got me a puppy for my birthday when I was in 6th grade. It’s especially memorable because I was sick with chicken pox, but I forgot all about that when I opened the box to the fuzzy little pup inside. His name was Beau, and he was my best friend. He was a beautiful German shepherd/old English sheepdog mix.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Oh, no, they are always central to the story, and play a role just as important as the human characters.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

I can’t imagine a life without animals in it. They are more than pets to me. They’re a part of our family. It’s as simple as that. I makes me happy to include pets; especially dogs, in my stories. I often catch myself smiling as I’m writing these parts of the story.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

Well, of course I have to say Beethoven is my favorite dog movie. It’s when I began my love-affair with large-breed dogs. Before the three dogs I have today, my very first Saint Bernard was Bear. I like to say he was my soul-dog. We were connected, and were very close, he and I. My favorite book is MARLEY AND ME. I absolutely loved that book, though I sobbed at the end and had to put the book down because I couldn’t see the words through my tears. Another favorite book is FREE DAYS WITH GEORGE. It’s such a heart-warming story! (And, or course, the breed is the same as my Sophie!)

 What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

Do I have to pick just one? LOL!

Chewie, our Saint Bernese, is quite the hugger! He’ll jump up on the couch, sit between us, and bend himself in half to lay his head on top of ours. I read an article recently that stated that dogs don’t really like to hug. Ha! Obviously, they’ve never met Chewie!

Another story…We had a cat named Casper, who wedged himself between the kitchen floor and the basement ceiling under the duct. We heard him meowing and it took us forever to find where he was. We had to cut a hole in the kitchen floor to get him out! Totally worth it!

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I’ve always said I wanted to be a writer. (I know, that’s everyone’s story, but it’s true!) I’m a teacher, and I started with children’s picture books. (By the way, I have a children’s picture book coming out later in 2018 called JOCELYN’S BOX OF SOCKS.) As I mentioned earlier, I had an idea for writing SNOW DOG, and it was just too long to fit into a 32-page children’s picture book, so I decided to write a novel and discovered my love for it! I haven’t stopped since.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

I always joke and say that my dream is to be a stay-at-home dog-mom! Wouldn’t that be great? I could stay at home, take care of the dogs, and write. If I had a huge house with lots of land, I’d love to run a large-breed dog rescue.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

I write on the couch with my laptop, and usually one of the dogs is snuggled up next to me while I’m writing.

 What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

My son, who lives with us, has two ferrets, Smokey and Bandit. We have a rescued cockatiel named Shady. In the past we’ve had lizards, frogs, a turtle, and a cat. Yes. I guess you could call us animal-lovers.

About Kristen

I’ve been a teacher for over twenty years, and I live in Reading, Pennsylvania with my husband, two grown sons, and three large-breed dogs. Books inspire me. From children’s picture books to adult literature in all genres, I have loved reading all my life. Becoming a published author is a dream come true for me, and I look forward to sharing my stories with you! Sign up on my website to follow  my blog.

I love writing, reading, and spending time with my family and dogs at our cabin in the Poconos…my favorite place to escape and write!

Kristen L. Jackson, Author of KEEPER OF THE WATCH released 2/1/18

 Available for Pre-order at:

Black Rose Writing

(https://www.blackrosewriting.com/childrens-booksya/keeperofthewatch)

Amazon

(https://www.amazon.com/Keeper-Watch-Dimension-Kristen-Jackson/dp/161296981X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1511615010&sr=1-1&keywords=Keeper+of+the+Watch)

Barnes & Noble

(https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/keeper-of-the-watch-kristen-l-jackson/1127336385?ean=9781612969817)

Let’s Be Social…

Facebook: @kristenjacksonauthor (https://www.facebook.com/kristenjacksonauthor)

Twitter: @KLJacksonAuthor (https://www.twitter.com/KLJacksonAuthor)

Tumblr: https://kristenjacksonauthor.tumblr.com

Good Reads: Kristen L. Jackson (https://www.goodreads.com/goodreadscomkristenjackson)

Instagram: @krisjack504 (https://www.instagram.com/krisjack504)

Yahoo: kristenjacksonauthor@yahoo.com

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Welcome, Helena Fairfax!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Helena Fairfax to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I live in the north of England near the Yorkshire moors and the home of the Brontë sisters. The moors were the setting for Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights. Living near such a wild, romantic landscape, it’s little surprise that I was inspired to start writing romance! My first novel, The Silk Romance, was published in 2013, and since then I’ve had several novels and short stories published. My works have been shortlisted for several awards, including the Exeter Novel Prize and the Global Ebook Awards. I also work as a freelance editor, and I’ve found I get as much enjoyment from helping others get the best out of their manuscripts as I do with my own writing. Telling stories is my passion.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I have a rescue dog called Lexi, who is a Staffie cross. Lexi was abandoned as a puppy. When we first took her home she was very wary around strangers and highly reactive towards other dogs. Once she gets to know people, she is the most affectionate and loving dog imaginable. She’s playful and intelligent, she loves to walk the moors with us where it’s nice and peaceful, and every day we go out is like a brand new, exciting day for her. We wouldn’t be without her now for the world.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Although I love my dog to bits, strangely I’ve only ever had one dog in one of my books. I have a short story called Come Date Me in Paris. [link http://mybook.to/DateMeParis ] The story features a little French poodle called Sweetie who is totally cute – and most unlike my own dog! Alice, the heroine of the story, appears on a reality TV dating show – and Sweetie proceeds to steal the show in a disastrous way. The story was really good fun to write!

What are you reading now?

I’m reading a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett called The Making of a Marchioness. A Little Princess was one of my favourite books as a child. I’d never heard of this novel until I was given it as a present. It’s really charming and I’m absolutely loving it!

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m working on a non-fiction history of the women of Halifax – a former mill town in Yorkshire near where I live. Next year is the centenary of the first women in the UK getting the vote, and the book is planned for release around the centenary.

I’m also working on an anthology of stories with a group of authors from the Romantic Novelists’ Association. Our stories will each be based on the same shop in a town local to us. Miss Moonshine’s Shop of Magical Things is the working title. I’m really excited about putting it together!

Who is your favorite author and why?

That is such a difficult question! I think perhaps in romance it would probably be Georgette Heyer. I can read her novels time and time again, and never get bored. Her heroes and heroines are always different, even though she’s written so many books. Her heroines are spirited and charming, each in their own way, and her heroes are always men to fall madly in love with.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

I was one of seven children, so my poor mum had no time for pets as well…! I’d have loved to have had a dog as a child, so I’m making up for it now.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

Probably my favourite movie with an animal is The Wizard of Oz. I love Judy Garland in anything. She has an amazing voice and such an ability to convey emotion. Toto is such a sweet dog and the perfect animal to accompany her on her adventure.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

When my mum was a child they had a little mongrel dog they’d found abandoned. The dog really took to my granddad. My granddad used to take the dog on the bus with him, and give it a pie from the butcher’s. After a while the dog learned the route, and he used to hop on the bus all by himself, sit at the front with the driver, and make his own way to the butcher’s. After being given a pie, he’d go to the bus stop and get the bus home!

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

Lexi is getting old now, which is quite sad for us after seeing her bounding about the moors as a young dog. Nowadays we don’t walk as far as we did, and when I’m writing she’s quite happy to cuddle up next to me and sleep. Sometimes her snores disturb my concentration, but it’s lovely to have her to talk to about my characters. She’s a great listener!

A Year of Light and Shadows covers a year of mystery, suspense and romance in the life of Scottish actress Lizzie Smith and her bodyguard, Léon, culminating on New Year’s Eve in Edinburgh.

When Lizzie is offered the chance to play the role of a Mediterranean Princess, her decision to accept thrusts her into a world of intrigue and danger. Alone in the Palace, Lizzie relies on her quiet bodyguard, Léon, to guide her. But who is Léon really protecting? Lizzie…or the Royal Princess?

Back home in Scotland Lizzie begins rehearsals for Macbeth and finds danger stalking her through the streets of Edinburgh. Lizzie turns to her former bodyguard, Léon, for help…and discovers a secret he’d do anything not to reveal.

Buy link: http://mybook.to/lightandshadows

About Helena Fairfax

Helena Fairfax is a British author who was born in Uganda and came to England as a child. She’s grown used to the cold now, and these days she lives in an old Victorian mill town in the north of England, right next door to the windswept Yorkshire moors. She walks this romantic landscape every day with her rescue dog, finding it the perfect place to dream up her heroes and her happy endings.
Helena’s novels have been shortlisted for several awards, including the Exeter Novel Prize, the Global Ebook Awards, the I Heart Indie Awards, and the UK’s Romantic Novelists’ Association New Writers’ Scheme Award.

Social Links

Newsletter (all new subscribers receive a romantic novella): http://eepurl.com/bRQtsT

Website and blog: www.helenafairfax.com

Besides the above, I also post photos of the moors and other places I’ve visited on social media.

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/HelenaFairfax/

Twitter https://twitter.com/HelenaFairfax

Pinterest https://uk.pinterest.com/helenafairfax/

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/helenafairfax/

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Welcome, Barbara Schlichting

Pens, Paws, and Claws welcomes Barbara Schlichting to the blog!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

 I enjoy teasing and having fun with my grandchildren. My granddaughter and I are planning to take a short trip to Iowa next summer so I can drop by a few bookstores.  Her blue eyes and smile sells my books. I write mysteries and children’s picture books plus poetry. I’ve also been known to wear red shoes and eat too much ice cream.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I’m not sure if you can consider deer, squirrels, birds and chipmunks as pets, but I lived in the woods with the Mississippi River out my back door for seventeen years.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

 In my poetry, I have a number of poems about wildlife.  In my picture book, Red Shoes, I feature Maggie, a three-legged kitty who lost her shoes. Peter the puppy and Bonnie the bunny help her find them.

What are you reading now?

I just finished two Rex Stout books, Fer-De-Lance and the League of Frightened Men.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I just published my first historical mystery. Body on the Tracks is set in 1943 and begins with a body in the Chicago railyard and finishes in Denver. There’s a Nazi onboard who causes all sorts of murder and mayhem.

 Who is your favorite author and why?

Agatha Christie. She’s so good at hiding her clues. I love reading her.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

We had a dog when I was in high school. When I married, we had a dog for many years for our boys to play with, Clumsy was her name.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

In the picture book, Red Shoes, the animals are definitely the characters.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

Animals are sweet and loveable.

 Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

Actually, I should write a mystery with a service dog. My brother had been a police officer and used a service dog to detect drugs so I have an easy reference. Thanks for the idea!

 When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

 I knew I was a writer from the beginning of time. In seventh grade I got an English penpal, and we’ve been writing ever since. That’s approximately fifty-five years!

 Biography:

I graduated from Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis, MN. After marriage, we moved to Bemidji where we raised our two boys. I graduated from Bemidji State University with an undergraduate degree in  elementary education and went on to earn a masters degree in special education. I taught in the school district as a substitute for many years.

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Welcome, Janis Susan May/Janis Patterson

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Janis Susan May/Janis Patterson to the blog for Writer Wednesday!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’m a seventh generation Texan and a third generation wordsmith. I sold my first novel to a NY publisher in 1979 and have since published around 35 novels – I really don’t remember exactly how many. I was one of the founders of Romance Writers of America and currently serve as the Texas representative on the Southwest Regional Board of Mystery Writers of America. Now I am mainly self-publishing under my Sefkhat-Awbi Books imprint. In addition, I’ve been Editor in Chief of two multi-magazine publishing groups, an actress/singer, Supervisor of Accessioning in a bio-genetic DNA testing lab, a travel writer, a jewelry designer, a talent agent, a document checker in a travel agency… plus more stuff. Yes, I bore very easily!

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I’ve had pets most of my life. First there was Lady (a golden Cocker Spaniel) and her daughter T-Square. I had a parakeet. I had a white rat named Junder for whom I made a halter and leash out of pink grosgrain ribbon. We stopped traffic when we went for walks, especially in winter when I wore my full length fur. For a while I babysat a 6-7 foot long anaconda when my cousin (a world-class herpetologist) was ill. That was a fascinating experience, though I never could get service in that apartment again for all the years I lived there… When I moved out of my parents’ home, I had cats, as I worked long hours and they weren’t as labor intensive as dogs.

For years I had a recessive gene semi-feral Siamese named Sekhmet who was solid black with bright green eyes. She was also the most intelligent animal I’ve ever known, who could open any door in the house except the two outside doors, which I kept deadbolted, and used to turn the lights off and on just to amuse herself. Sekhmet hated people and would simply vaporize when anyone came over. There were those who – when I told them stories about Sekhmet – would swear that I didn’t have a cat, that I would go out and pluck tufts of cat hair from the bushes and rub them into the carpet just to pretend I had a cat. Yes, I have strange friends. Sekhmet also liked to answer the telephone, which drove the telemarketers wild. (Good girl!) She lived to be 21, and I miss her to this day.

After Sekhmet I got a ginger cat named Marmelade. She was very obviously mentally deficient, probably because she had been taken too early from her mother. She was grown when I got her, but didn’t know anything about being a cat. She would get into the litter box, vigorously dig a hole in the litter to the bottom, put her front feet into it and then poop over the side. I had to teach her how to use a litter box properly. It was no fun at all, and is not a fit topic for conversation. She never was very well and died less than a year after I got her.

I didn’t have any animals when I started dating the man who would become my husband, which was a lucky thing. He hated cats and told me years later that he would never have dated anyone who had a cat! It took some guile on my part, but I did get a cat after we had been married about two years – just in time to keep me company during his first overseas deployment. Shadow was a stray who crawled into our yard, too emaciated and weak to walk and tattered from attacks by other animals. An old cat, he had been declawed and could neither escape or protect himself. Of course I took him to the vet immediately and did everything I could to take care of him. We had him for several years. We got a little tuxedo cat to keep him company. When she came to us she had been declawed in all four feet – first time I ever saw that – and was very skittish. All our animals are rescue animals, by the way, and usually from horrific situations. Her name was Boots, but I used to know a woman named Boots, and I didn’t like the name. Usually we don’t change our animals’ names – they’ve been through enough trauma without adding another name change – but ‘Boots’ had to go. She had a tiny little voice so I started calling her Squeaky Boots, hoping to transition easily to Squeaky, but she had to have orthodontic surgery. Her teeth were so bad and so abscessed that her jaw bones were rotting, and so her official vet records were done as Squeaky Boots, so it was as Squeaky Boots she ended her days.

About this time I saw at our local pet orphanage a tiny little white poodle named Harriette. She was 14, had had surgery to remove a tumor from her leg (common in tiny poodles) so most of her backside was shaved, and the rest of her was unimaginably scruffy. It was love at first sight. As soon as The Husband came home from work I grabbed him even before giving him dinner and off we went to the pet orphanage. We came home with a dog. We had Harriette for nearly a year – it turned out she also had a rare cancer and despite two surgeries we just could not keep her alive. She died just before The Husband left for yet another Iraqi deployment. While he was gone I adopted another cat, a pathetic older cat named Chloe who had been seized from a home where she had been tortured for years. She’s the biggest cat I’ve ever seen, and very beautiful, but constantly terrified. It took her years to become easy with The Husband and me. It’s sad, because although her mental faculties are still sharp, she is losing control of her bowels and bladder. She is 17, after all. We’ve had to create her a room within in a room that is lined with plastic where she can roam. Her bed and litter box and feeding tray are in there. We clean her enclosure and change her bedding at least once a day, and take her into the den with us several times a day, but it hurts that we cannot give her the freedom of the house. Before you ask, we’ve had her looked at by the vet several times, tried a variety of medicines, but nothing helps. She will live as comfortably as we can make it until she dies.

When The Husband returned we decided to get another dog. He will only consider a little dog, so we went to the pet orphanage – only to find that the only little dog they had was promised to a woman from out of town who was coming to get her at the end of the week. The staff – many of whom are friends – knew that The Husband was just back from a year in a war zone, so when I asked if we could just play with her for a little while they were happy to let us. We were in an exam room and when Mindy came in we knew she was Our Dog. She’s a small dog, half terrier mix and (I swear) half diva. She was scruffy (she’s always scruffy – it’s the way her hair grows) and wearing the ugliest little dress I’ve ever seen. We lost our hearts.

After about half an hour the director of the orphanage – whom we didn’t know – came in to pick Mindy up. We told her we wanted the dog. She told us that was impossible, that they had been talking to this woman from out of town and she was coming to pick up the dog in a few days. I said, “When she calls to tell you she doesn’t want the dog, call us because we do.”

The woman said it was ridiculous, that they had been talking to this woman for over two weeks and she was coming to get the dog. We went through this dialogue with increasing intensity several times before she finally agreed to take my phone number, probably more to shut me up than anything else.

The pet orphanage is 4.4 miles from our house. We had not made it home before my phone rang and this tremulous little voice said, “Mrs. Patterson? We just heard from (the woman) and she doesn’t want the dog.” We picked Mindy up the next morning and she has brightened our home ever since. For as long as she worked there, though, the orphanage director was very obviously careful never to be alone with me. I do wish, however, that I knew what I had done! It could be a very useful skill.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

This question gave me pause. As involved as I am with animals, it was a shock to me to find that I don’t put animals in any position of prominence in my stories. My stories are so intense, and so involved, and usually set in odd places, that animals just don’t fit. I’m going to see about changing that. One thing I’ll never do is have animals that talk or solve crimes on their own.

I did put a cat in a book called LURE OF THE MUMMY – sort of. It’s a story of a cursed cat mummy and was the very first pure horror novel ever published by Carina or its parent company Harlequin.

What are you reading now?

Currently I am re-reading my friend Salima Ikram’s DIVINE CREATURES (about sacred animal mummies in Ancient Egypt) as research for a possible novel idea. For fun I’m reading an omnibus of Mary Roberts Rinehart’s short stories.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I am one of those people who are not happy unless they have several projects going at once. At this exact moment I am working on the third Flora Melkiot mystery MURDER AT FIVE TO ONE, which is set in Las Vegas; Flora is a wealthy widow of a certain age who has been described as the ‘dark side of Miss Marple.’ I love her and kind of wish I could grow up to be her! I’m also working on a straight medical romance called FEVER HEAT about a medical team sent to the Mexican coast to help after a devastating hurricane. I’m about halfway through a straight romance called INDIAN SUMMER about two grandparents each of whom want sole custody of their orphaned grandson, so of course they fall in love. I’ve just finished the first book in my new Dr. Rachel Petrie, contract archaeologist series called A KILLING AT TARA TWO. It’s getting cold so I can start my editing process with a clear head before it goes to the real editor. I have just had a contemporary gothic romance called THE MASTER OF MORECOMBE HALL (about an American bride in England), a straight romance called ROMANCE AT SPANISH ROCK (about an LA photographer who inherits a ranch in Texas’ Palo Duro canyon) and a murder mystery called MURDER AND MISS WRIGHT (about murder and antiquities smuggling at a scholarly Egyptological conference) edited and am just waiting until I have time to format and self-publish them.

Who is your favorite author and why?

Oh, this is easy. Barbara Michaels, aka Elizabeth Peters, aka Dr. Barbara Mertz. She had such a way with words, and such a gift for storytelling. I still am in awe of her talent. She is one of the reasons I decided that I really might make writing novels my own career instead of just a life-long hobby. It was truly a blessing was that we met and became dear if sporadic friends. What was truly funny was that although by the time we met I had almost a dozen novels published what brought us together was our work in and passion for Egyptology – not our shared career of writing!

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

My mother didn’t really care for pets, but when I was a small child we had a tribe of cats that lived outside and which we fed. Very rarely was I allowed to bring one inside as a special treat. I remember there being lots of them, but the names of only two – Lampshadey (hey – I was only three!) and Favorite. I do remember that a wild cat moved into our area and was killing our cats. My father borrowed a .22 rifle from a friend and chased the wild cat (which may even have been rabid – again, I was no more than four) into the garage where we had stored some furniture that wouldn’t fit into our tiny house. He finally killed the cat – after shooting the piano bench. I still have that bench, complete with the .22 slug in the seat.

Years later my father, who had had dogs all his young life, decreed that we get a dog. In the same year that Lady and the Tramp was released we got a cute little golden cocker spaniel named (no surprise) Lady. Her real name was Lady Ginger Banner Marinus Underfoot May – each name has a special meaning, but they’re too long to go into here. She had several litters of puppies, all of whom we found homes except for one which I refused to let go of. She was solid black, parentage unknown, but had a perfectly formed T on her chest and a perfect square on her left back foot, both in pure white. As my parents had an advertising agency and in the graphic arts a T-square is a basic tool, of course the dog became T-Square. We had both of them for years, until they were poisoned. We never knew who or why. There were no more animals in my life until I moved out on my own and got Sekhmet.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

Oh, this is going to get naughty. Years ago, many years before I even met The Husband, I had a date with a nice young man. After dinner and a movie he took me home and we ended up in a heavy petting session in my darkened living room. I hadn’t seen fit to tell him that I had a cat – first of all because at the moment I had other things on my mind besides the cat and second because I knew the cat wouldn’t come out if someone strange was in the house. Well, the room was dark except for the glow of a streetlamp coming through the single window and we were… well, you know, snuggling on the couch when all of a sudden this nice young man let out a shriek. I didn’t usually have that effect on men, so I looked around and saw two bright red eyes glowing in the dark. Immediately I knew it was the cat – remember, she was pure black – sitting on the arm of a chair, just in the right place where the light behind her could make her eyes glow without showing her silhouette. Before I could say a word the nice young man jumped up and dashed out of the apartment, screaming all the way. Later I tried to reach him, but he never would take my calls. I had his shirt, his jacket and his shoes for almost a year before giving them to charity.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

Two of my grandmothers were teachers. One grandfather was the publisher of a small town newspaper when that was a position of real power. My mother was a teacher, a producer of plays, a magazine columnist and an advertising agent. My father began as a printers’ devil when he was nine, edited and published newspapers all over Texas, taught journalism at Texas A&M (where he separated the journalism department from the English department and made it a separate discipline), then with my mother began the family advertising agency which for 16 or the 17 years of its existence was one of the top 300 in the country. So, you see I didn’t have a snowball’s chance of becoming anything but some kind of a wordsmith.

My parents never knew when I learned to read, but I did read them a short story from the newly arrived Saturday Evening Post (which neither of them had even seen) when I was three. By the time I entered the first grade I had read most of Boswell, some Pearl Buck, some Ellery Queen and most of Shakespeare. One of the biggest disappointments of my life was that once I got to school they started teaching us the alphabet and reading Dick and Jane aloud to us instead of discussing the motivations in Troilus and Cressida! I hated school from that moment of disillusion.

When I was four I wrote my first book. It was a tale of some children playing in the park who capture an escaped lion and make it home in time for supper. I printed and illustrated each page by hand, after having begged some paper and sewing thread from my parents. Daddy had told me about the different kinds of binding, saying that signature sewn was the best. I sewed twelve copies of my little book together. I think there are one or two still extant stored with my late mother’s papers. I’ve been writing ever since – sometimes for publication, sometimes not, but always writing no matter what else I did.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

This changes just about every day. Right now it’s vacillating between getting back to Egypt for a relaxing holiday, as we haven’t been there in 3 years, and taking a loooong European river cruise. We’ve never taken a cruise like that (they are expensive!) and I would absolutely love to. Or it could be to go spend a month in England, visiting friends and doing research. Or it could be to go visit my dear friend in Peru.

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

Chloe the cat is either in her plastic lined room or sitting beside my desk in her carrier. With her incontinence problems we cannot let her run free around the house any longer, but at least in her carrier she can be wherever we are, feel as if she is still part of the family, and we do take her out and hold her in our arms often. Mindy the dog is either running around barking at leaves, postmen and marauding moths, begging for scraps from my lunch or sleeping stretched out on the back of the couch.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

Piles? Mountains are more like it. I live in a house with three libraries, and The Husband and I are contemplating a fourth. Plus, I have over 3,000 unread books on my Kindle – which I never use, as I prefer to read on my phone during the few short times I actually get to read for pleasure. The Husband and I prefer to buy our good reference books in hardcopy – he is an expert on war history and firearms, I research crime and the English Regency, and we are both avid amateur Egyptologists. (We met through our Egyptological studies, and he even proposed to me in a moonlit garden across the street from the Pyramids. Yes, those Pyramids!) If it weren’t for electronic reading our house would be so full of books we would have to sleep in a tent in the back yard!

Janis’ Biography:

Janis Susan May/Janis Patterson is a 7th-generation Texan and a 3rd-generation wordsmith who writes in mystery, romance, and horror. Once an actress and a singer Janis has also been editor-in-chief of two multi-magazine publishing groups as well as many other things, including an enthusiastic amateur Egyptologist. Janis’ husband even proposed in a moonlit garden near the Pyramids of Giza. Janis and her husband live in Texas with an assortment of rescued furbabies.

Janis’ Website 

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The Pets in My House and in My Stories

Pets are family, and they play a huge part in our lives. My husband and I share our home with two crazy Jack Russell Terriers, Disney (the brunette) and her brother Riley. They are two little bundles of energy. They love playing tug with their sock monkeys, chasing squirrels, and long walks. Riley takes great pride in saving us from delivery drivers, joggers, and dog walkers in the neighborhood. Riley can also hear a cheese wrapper or the fridge open from 100 yards away. Their favs are cheese, bacon, and popcorn.

Disney and Riley hang out in the office when I write. They also listen when I plot story lines or read dialog aloud. So it’s quite natural that animals would be a part of my novels and stories. 

In my novels, Margaret the Bulldog is the sidekick to my sleuth’s partner, Duncan Reynolds. She has a starring role in Secret Lives and Private Eyes and The Tulip Shirt Murders. Margaret is a brown and white log with legs. She’s not much security around the office, but she’s good company. She’s also the slobber queen, and her two favs are snacking and napping. Margaret is Duncan’s constant shadow, and she likes riding shotgun in his Tweety-bird yellow Camaro. (Secret Lives and Private Eyes also features a pair of Alpacas, Joe and Myrtle.)

I’m working on a novella called, Moving on. It should be out later this year. This cozy features a little Jack Russell named Darby who uncovers a murder. She’s based on my JRT Disney. Darby is a bundle of energy who likes walks, games of rope tug, snuggles, and lots of treats. I have another novel in progress, and it has a JRT named Bijou. Disney was also the model for her. Riley’s feeling a little slighted, so I’ll have to base the next dog on him.
Here’s Disney on one of the many dog beds in our house. This is also her “helping” me wrap Christmas presents.

My short stories also have dogs and cats. In “Washed up” in Virginia is for Mysteries, there are dogs that romp on Chic’s Beach in Virginia Beach. My story, “Spring Cleaning” in Virginia is for Mysteries II has cats who rule the roost of the story’s victim in Roanoke, Virginia.

 

Why types of pets do you have?

Heather Weidner’s Biography: 

Heather Weidner’s short stories appear in the Virginia is for Mysteries series and 50 Shades of Cabernet. She is a member of Sisters in Crime – Central Virginia, Guppies, and James River Writers. The Tulip Shirt Murders is her second novel in her Delanie Fitzgerald series.

Originally from Virginia Beach, Heather has been a mystery fan since Scooby Doo and Nancy Drew. She lives in Central Virginia with her husband and a pair of Jack Russell terriers.

Heather earned her BA in English from Virginia Wesleyan College and her MA in American literature from the University of Richmond. Through the years, she has been a technical writer, editor, college professor, software tester, and IT manager.

 

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Meet Nupur Tustin

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome author Nupur Tustin to the blog for #WriterWednesday!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.
I’m a former journalist who misuses a Ph.D. in Communication and an M.A. in English to orchestrate mayhem in Haydn’s Austria. I also write music. My 1903 Weber Upright is responsible for that crime.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?
We used to have two adorable pit bulls. But Fatty, our oldest, passed on in 2014. Chickie, who really wasn’t all that old, went this last summer. So, unfortunately at this time, we have no pets at all. Once my three children—the oldest is five and the youngest two—are a little older, we might get a dog or two for the family.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?
It’s a strange thing about the eighteenth century, but we never hear about people lavishing attention on their animals. Dogs and horses served a purely utilitarian purpose, and anyone who enjoyed hunting would have owned both. Haydn did enjoy the hunt as did Dittersdorf, a fellow musician, and they were both rather good at it.

Marie Antoinette was thought a bit strange because shortly after she married the Dauphin at the age of fourteen, she asked for a little dog to play with in her chambers. This was as strange as her tendency to invite the children of her chamber maids over to her rooms so she could play with them. In the Viennese court where she grew up, her desire to play and have fun would have been accepted as a natural part of her youthful high spirits. In the Court of Versailles, where etiquette reigned supreme, it was unseemly for the Crown Princess to do anything at all other than to devote herself to her dress and toilette and to observe the proprieties.

Frederick the Great of Prussia was also regarded as eccentric for lavishing as much attention as he did on his Italian greyhounds. They slept on his bed, were served in the best bowls, and the servants were instructed to use the formal “Vous” when addressing them rather than the more usual third person. All of this would have been regarded as being in keeping with his personality: a man who seemed to care little for his fellow humans.

 What are you reading now?

I’m re-reading a biography of Maria Theresa as well reading one of her daughter, Marie Antoinette. A straightforward young girl given over to levity and high spirits, Marie Antoinette was ill-suited for the web of intrigue that was the Court of Versailles. Unlike Vienna, where except for state functions, the royals lived in privacy—indeed almost like country squires—at Versailles, every detail of their lives from sleeping to getting dressed was done in the public eye. Worse still, for seven long years her marriage remained unconsummated.

In giving herself over to pleasure, she was both compensating for this lack of physical intimacy as well as rebelling against the interminable etiquette of the court that constrained her freedom in every manner. But had she heeded her mother’s advice and that of her brother, Joseph II, the revolution might have been avoided. It was fairly easy to make her the scapegoat for everything that was wrong with France, although things had been going wrong for a long time. Louis XV was an extremely unpopular king and the people hoped things would change under Louis XVI.

It’s fascinating to read simultaneously about mother and daughter. Both were pleasure-loving young women. But the mother at twenty-three was tasked with saving the Empire she’d inherited. She had already had two children and was heavily pregnant with her successor, Joseph II. Maria Theresa was forced to take herself to task. But unfortunately, the twin challenges of motherhood and adversity that eventually compelled her to draw upon her inner resources came too late for Marie Antoinette.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m working on the third Haydn Mystery, Prussian Counterpoint. Haydn will be traveling to Potsdam, a small town in Prussia that Frederick II preferred to Berlin. He spent most of his time there. It might be fun to give Frederick’s Italian greyhounds a strong story role, although I haven’t decided what that will be. They were, apparently, as misogynistic as their master and howled at women!

Who is your favorite author and why?

It’s hard to pick a favorite because there are so many I enjoy. Donna Leon’s Guido Brunetti Mysteries are absolutely fascinating. It’s her portrayal of Venice that I find so compelling. Stephanie Barron captures Jane Austen’s voice so perfectly in her mystery series that one almost feels one is words penned by Austen herself. Emily Brightwell’s Mrs. Jeffries Series, so reminiscent of Agatha Christie, have given me many hours of joy as have Kate Kingsbury’s Pennyfoot Hotel Mysteries.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I’ve always enjoyed writing and since I was always having my essays and stories read out in class, I can’t really remember a time when I, or anyone else, thought I wasn’t one. We used to be given impromptu writing prompts, and I always did well on those. I never had a problem writing a coherent narrative, no matter what the topic.

But was I a storyteller? The confidence to call myself that came much later, once I’d written Minor Deception, the first Haydn Mystery, as well as published a few short stories.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

I’d like to attend mass at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna. It’s one of the oldest cathedrals in the city, and they still play music by Haydn, Mozart, and their contemporaries. I’m not a particularly religious person. I’m not even Catholic. But what a wondrous experience that would be.

What is the latest Haydn Mystery about?
Aria to Death, the second Haydn Mystery, is about music authentication. Haydn’s friend Kaspar asks him to examine a collection of scores reputed to be the lost operas of Monteverdi. Since seven of the ten operas this great master wrote are lost to us, Haydn is naturally intrigued. Until, of course, the Empress contacts him with a similar request. She, too, has managed to procure a couple of Monteverdi opera scores. Before Haydn can evaluate either set of scores, Kaspar is murdered—brutally beaten and left to die in front of a wine tavern.

The police are quick to dismiss the death as a robbery gone wrong. But Haydn is not so sure. Kaspar’s keys were stolen and his house broken into. Could his bequest be genuine after all? And can Haydn find the true operas—and the man willing to kill for them?

The answer is, of course, in the book!

Aria to Death: A Joseph Haydn Mystery

Genre: Historical Cozy Mystery

Preoccupied with preparations for the opera season at Eszterháza, Kapellmeister Joseph Haydn receives a curious request from a friend in Vienna. Kaspar, an impoverished violinist with an ailing wife, wishes Haydn to evaluate a collection of scores reputed to be the lost operas of Monteverdi.

Haydn is intrigued until Her Majesty, Empress Maria Theresa, summons him with a similar request. Skeptical of the value of Kaspar’s bequest, Haydn nevertheless offers to help. But before he can examine the works, Kaspar is murdered—beaten and left to die in front of a wine tavern.

The police are quick to dismiss the death as a robbery gone wrong. But Haydn is not so sure. Kaspar’s keys were stolen and his house broken into. Could his bequest be genuine after all? And can Haydn find the true operas—and the man willing to kill for them?

About Nupur:

A former journalist, Nupur Tustin relies upon a Ph.D. in Communication and an M.A. in English to orchestrate fictional mayhem.  The Haydn mysteries are a result of her life-long passion for classical music and its history. Childhood piano lessons and a 1903 Weber Upright share equal blame for her original compositions, available on ntustin.musicaneo.com.

Her writing includes work for Reuters and CNBC, short stories and freelance articles, and research published in peer-reviewed academic journals. She lives in Southern California with her husband and  three rambunctious children.

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Meet Patricia Dusenbury

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I used to be an economist who read a lot of mystery stories and dabbled in writing fiction.  When I retired from economics, I began writing fulltime. My mysteries are more puzzle than thriller and more cozy than hard-boiled, but they are not books where someone dies but no one gets hurt. I want to my readers to feel the characters’ emotions. Whether the victim is a homeless man on the margins of society, a nasty old woman, or an aspiring young actress, someone cares that they are gone. I hope the reader cares, too, and cheers when the killer is brought to justice.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

My husband and I both grew up with dogs, and when our children were young, we had a menagerie of dogs, cats, and guinea pigs, some of which I have used in my writing. I’m down to just one pet these days, a 13-year-old Alaskan malamute named Babe. Every morning, Babe and I walk up a steep hill to a park overlooking San Francisco. If we’re early enough, we catch the sunrise on the bay. It’s good exercise and a good way to begin the day. I have not written about her yet, but I will.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Dorian Gray is a large fluffy orange cat and the reincarnation of a large fluffy orange cat my daughter acquired when she was in high school.  Dorian is in all three Claire Marshall books. He is Claire’s companion and comfort. She can tell him anything. And he tries to warn her…   There are also horses in Secrets, Lies & Homicide, because I was one of those little girls obsessed with horses – as was Claire.

What are you reading now?

Zagreb Cowboy by Alen Mattich, a thriller set in Croatia in 1991 just as Yugoslavia is descending into civil war.  It was a Christmas present, given to me because I spent several years working in Croatia after the civil war ended. It’s a page-turner, and I’m enjoying revisiting once familiar places.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I have a “finished” novel and about a third of the sequel in the drawer while I figure out what happens next. Meanwhile, I’ve been writing short stories and have a couple in anthologies, most recently in Snowbound: Best New England Crime Stories 2017. I’m in an experimental mood, and short stories allow me to experiment without getting six months down the road and deciding it’s just not working.  One of the short stories I’m fooling around with is a “romance” between a cat lady and a con man.

Who is your favorite author and why?

It’s a long list because I love to read and there are so many good writers, but If I have to pick one, Elizabeth Strout.  My favorite mystery writer is Louise Penny, and I write the same type of character-driven, not quite cozy mystery that she does.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

A boxer named Duchess, a hound mix named Chloe, and a German shepherd named Toby were part of my childhood.  My mother resisted rodents as pets, but one of my sisters did have a horned toad. My high-school tying teacher gave me a Siamese cat named Sam that I talked my parents into keeping. Sam has a role in The Cat Lady and The Con Man. For years, I desperately wanted a horse, but it was not to be.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

Animals have been part of my life, and it just feels right to make them part of my main character’s life. I can imagine a world without animals but I wouldn’t want to spend time in it.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

As a child I devoured Walter Farley’s Black Stallion series (as well as Nancy Drew), but I didn’t like the movies as much.  As an adult, Marley and Me is my favorite. The book and the movie were both wonderful.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

Nothing I can repeat here, but trust me, it was funny.

What do your pets do when you are writing?  

Babe lies on the rug by the door to my office. I cannot go anywhere without stepping over her. I believe that’s the point.

Author Biography:

Patricia Dusenbury is a recovering economist trying to atone for all those dull reports by writing mysteries that people read for pleasure. Her first book, A Perfect Victim, won the 2015 Eppie, the Electronic Publishing Industry Coalitions award, for best mystery. The next two books in the trilogy were finalists for the Eppie: Secrets, Lies & Homicide in 2016 and A House of Her Own 2017. Each book is a stand-alone mystery story. Read in order they are also the story of a young woman’s journey from emotionally fragile widow to a daring new life.  

 Patricia lives on a very steep street in San Francisco and, when she is not writing, can be found hanging out with the grandkids or enjoying the fabulous city that is her home. She is a member of NorCal sisters in Crime.

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