Meet Kristina Stanley

This week, Kristina Stanley is our guest author for #WriterWednesday. Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

 Thank you for having me on Pens, Paws, and Claws. It’s exciting for me to post about writing and dogs. My two passions in life. I’m the CEO of Fictionary. I co-founded Fictionary after I had 4 books published and had developed a process for performing my own structural edit.

My mysteries are very setting dependent. They take place British Columbian mountains, the Bahamas, and Loughborough Lake in Kingston Ontario.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

Farley Mowat is a 9-year-old Wheaten Terrier. My previous dog, Chica, was a yellow Labrador. Not only are my pets models for writing, I use many other dogs in my novels. In Look The Other Way, there is a dog named Piddles. I met her in the Bahamas and decided she needed a role.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

My Yellow Lab, Chica, died when she was four. It broke my heart. At the time I was writing Descent, the first in the Stone Mountain Series, so I gave her a role. It was a way for me to keep her with me.

Farley has a large role in Blaze, a cameo in Look The Other Way, and is a character (under the name of Mowat) in my work in progress, Evolution.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’ve finished the first draft of Evolution. Jaz Cooper’s husband dies under mysterious circumstances. Weeks later, Jaz rescues a dog from drowning and is wounded by the dog. The two incidents are linked, and Jaz tries to discover what really happened to her husband.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

I’ve always had dogs, and I don’t seem to have a preference for a breed. In order of appearance in my life I had Frosty a Samoyed. Toby a Samoyed. Polo a Newfoundland. Mia a  Newfoundland. Arf a British Bull Terrier. Emmett a Dalmatian. And Zack a Standard Poodle.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

They are characters in their own right. I’m very interested in how animals affect the lives of humans and how much a human gains from a relationship with an animal. I love to explore this topic.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

I believe in writing about what you love. An author spends an awful lot of time with a novel, so for me, the topic needs to be a passion.

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

In my work in progress, Evolution, the main character is a dog trainer. And yes a service dog appears. Jaz, the protagonist, doesn’t realize she needs a therapy dog until she meets a yellow Labrador named Rose. When I’m writing, I imagine my yellow Labrador, Chica.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

 When I was a director at Panorama Mountain Village, I changed the policy to allow dogs at work. There was a selfish motive. I brought my dog, Chica, to work with me. She was under 6 months old, and I thought, fully housetrained, so I let her run free in the office.

Unbeknownst to me, a meeting was happening in the conference room.

“Okay, someone admit it. Who did that?” says one of the resort managers. “I can’t take the smell anymore.”

Giggles around the table, but no one admits to the gaseous emissions.

Then, a knock at my office door. “Has Chica been in the conference room?”

“Sure,” I say.

“You’d better come with me.”

So I follow the manager down the hallway. A group of people is moving from one conference room to another.

The manager points to the rug below the table. And there it sits. One big pile of steaming…

Let’s just say everyone had a fun time laughing at me while I cleaned up.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

Late one night in Unteruhldingen, Germany I was reading MOONLIGHT BECOMES YOU by Mary Higgins Clark. The opening—a woman trapped in a grave. Darkness and silence surround her, and she doesn’t know where she is. I can still see her fingers clawing at the edges of the coffin.

Tucked in my bed, I knew a driver would arrive at 4 a.m. to carry me to the Zurich airport for a flight to London, England. The sensible thing to do was sleep. But I couldn’t. I turned pages until the car arrived. I was exhausted, bleary eyed, and excited. At that moment I knew I wanted to write something that forced a person to read and to forget about life for a while.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

Farley is always with me when I’m writing. He sleeps at my feet. When he’s decided I’ve ignored him for long enough, he jumps up beside me. When he truly can’t control himself, he puts his head on my keyboard. Then I know it’s time for a walk.

About Kristina Stanley

Kristina Stanley is the CEO of Fictionary.co. Fictionary is an online tool that helps fiction writers turn a first draft into a great story.

 She is the best-selling author of the Stone Mountain Mystery Series, LOOK THE OTHER WAY, and THE AUTHOR’S GUIDE TO SELLING BOOKS TO NON-BOOKSTORES. She’s published by Imajin Books and Luzifer-Verlag.

 Her short stories have been published in the Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine and The Voices From the Valleys anthology.

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Teresa Inge Interviews Southern Cozy Writer, Tonya Kappes

Today, we are interviewing USA Today Bestselling Author of southern cozy mysteries and animal mom, Tonya Kappes.

TONYA, TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF?
Oh gosh, that’s a loaded question. I’m a mother of four young men who are all in college. My husband and I live in Kentucky. I’ve got 45 published novels. They are southern, charming, and funny. I write full time and love it!

HOW MANY ANIMALS DO YOU HAVE?
I have two Schnauzers. Charlie is thirteen and he’s my hero. He has Congestive Heart Failure, ATP autoimmune disease, a slushy gallbladder, an amputated back leg and toe. He takes nineteen pills a day. Lovingly, we refer to him as our college fund. We also have Scooter who is twelve and full of life. He’s always ready for a good time whether it’s playing with his “grunt grunt” or a fun walk.

WHAT IS A TYPICAL DAY LIKE FOR YOU WHEN WRITING & TENDING TO ANIMALS?
I get up around six a.m., but the dogs sleep until eight and then they eat. Scooter usually finds a warm quilt since I have several lying around. Charlie is my shadow. I can’t go from my deck to my kitchen to get a coffee refill without him following me. This entire time I’m writing. It I get up every hour for some exercise. I walk and the dogs follow me. Then it’s back to the office to write. Around noon, we walk around the neighborhood. I write all day and everyday. So this is a typical day. In the afternoon, I might move to the family room and sit on the couch with my laptop. Both dogs join me, I’m rarely without them.

Yes, I had a new release in my Kenni Lowry Mystery series. AX TO GRIND. There is a blood hound name Duke in the series. Kenni is a sheriff in a small town and Duke is her Deputy dog. He’s even gotten an award in bravery in earlier books. I write a dog in all my books. So fun! This is the third book in a ten book contract so I’m excited about all the things that Deputy Duke will be doing.
Thank you, Tonya for joining us today.

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Meet Rhian Williams

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Rhian Williams, blogger and poet.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’m a poet first, a writer of weird little stories and a blogger. I’m married with a kid living on the edge of nowhere Wales, work in a pharmacy to support my family and debilitating creative habits. I dabble in photography and art but writing is my life.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I have five cats (not by choice) and four chickens. Over the years I’ve had a number of dogs, rabbits, a guinea pig, over twenty hamsters and a few horses. And a ram called Major. Rather than model pets on them, I model people on them.

What are you reading now?

A book called The Girls Who Went To War about the women who joined the army, navy and war during the second world war. I wrote a piece of fiction about them some time ago and got it out for a dust off and decided to expand on it – which meant a little research.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’ve got a few short stories on the go as usual. Including the one about the Ack-Ack girls in the second world war, I’ve also got one set in the future in progress and a few bits of flash fiction about a post-apocalyptic magic future. It’s also OctPoWriMo – 31 poems in 31 days!

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

So, we had a lot of dogs growing up. When I moved to Wales we had a few acres of land and several horses (for breeding and showing not riding). Jenny-Lee was the friendliest horse. We have seven dogs at one point. Four terriers and three whippets. We’ve had rabbits (including one called Odd-Socks), hamsters (including one called Messy Pups who ate curtains), a peach face lovebird called Dickie and a ram called Major (as well as some sheep). I’d never had a cat until I was in my thirties though. I don’t like cats that much (honest).

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Depends on the story and my wife and I are always coming up with children’s stories about the cats. We’ve finished one and hope to write another together about our murderous Kitten the kitten.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

It’s a tie between the time our stallion got out of the field and spent half an hour being chased around the back garden by my step-dad while we watched from the window. Or the time we adopted Wiggles and the first thing he did (after jumping on my counters) was steal a pickle from my housemates sandwich. Not the meat, not the bread. The Pickle. We’d only had him half an hour.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I knew when I was about 17 that I was a poet, but there were signs that I’ve been a writer all my life. I have a book from when I was six that stories that I wrote (including one about aliens kidnapping my teddy bear that ends in a bit of a cliff-hanger).

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

To get a novel finished and published. I have a few half written – one I even won NaNoWriMo with and it over 58,000 words long so far but not finished. Eventually, I will finish it. Or one of the others.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

Sit on me. Knead me. Stare at me. They in no way help me.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

I have shelves of them but I tend to concentrate on the library books first. So I have Roadside Picnic by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky and The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett to read next.

The Cats…

Biography:

Rhian is a poet, blogger and geek living on the edge of nowhere Wales. They have five cats, four chickens, seven fish, another tank with dozens of snails in it and a thirteen month old. They write weird little stories and poems at Weird and Important. They also write about parenting, blogging, mental health and cats over at Queer Little Family.

Social Media Links:

Website: www.scruffy-duck.net

Blog: www.queerlittlefamily.co.uk

Twitter: anxiousgeek

Facebook:  facebook.com/rhianwilliamsthepoet

Instagram: anxious_geek

Pinterest: anxiousgeek

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Meet Samantha McGraw

Thanks for inviting me to stop by Pens, Paws, and Claws; I’m delighted to spend some time with your readers.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I’ve been a freelance writer for a several years now and I’m finally working on my first mystery novel. In the meantime, I’m writing for pure enjoyment over on my blog Tea Cottage Mysteries where I get to talk about my favorite things, tea and great mysteries. And when I have some free time, I love writing short stories, some of which I’ll be sharing soon on my blog.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I have a feisty tuxedo cat who tends to be a bit of a diva, and I love it! She’s very strong-willed and strong-minded. Her favorite place to spend time is on my heat blanket or a pile of clean clothes just out of the dryer.

I also have a sweet, snuggly tabby who was abandoned in our neighborhood about 2 years ago and decided he wanted to live at my house. Now he spends his days sunning himself on my back deck or visiting my neighbor’s house and his nights curled up on heat blanket, not to be outdone by the diva.

Cats have always been part of my life so it just feels natural for me to include at least one as a character in my book. The cat in my story is a blend of my 2 babies.

Above: Madi and Mitty

What are you reading now?

I almost always have 2 or 3 books going at once. At least one to actually read and always one on audio that I listen to in my car or while cooking dinner. With a TBR pile that never seems to shrink, this helps me keep it under control.

I’ve just finished reading an advance copy of Ellery Adams’ new book, The Secret, Book, & Scone Society, which was one of the best book I’ve read all year. Be sure to get it when it releases.

I’ve been craving an Agatha Christie so I’m trying to decide which one I’ll read next.

On audio, I’m listening to Lisa Scottoline’s Exposed. I love Mary DiNunzio, and I always enjoy Lisa’s work.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

There’s always something! Right now I have my first novel and two short stories in the works.

Who is your favorite author and why?

This is a tough one, there are so many I love. There are two at the top of my list though. Agatha Christie and Sue Grafton. I love Agatha’s stories because she’s so clever about “hiding” clues right in front of your face. You really have to pay attention or you’ll miss something very important. Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple challenge me to be at the top of my game to compete against them.

As for Sue’s Kinsey Millhone, I just love her. She has to be one of my favorite fictional characters. I wish she was real because I’d want to be her best friend. Sue is also very talented at hiding the obvious right in front of your face. When I get to the end I always feel like saying “Of course! I should have seen that!”, but I didn’t!

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

Charlotte’s Web! What’s better than a spider trying to save a pig’s life? ?

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

My husband and I still laugh about this one. We were sitting up in bed one night watching a movie and our diva kitty was snoozing in a box on the bed (if you’ve ever had a cat, I don’t have to explain the box obsession). She was sleeping so soundly she was snoring; it was adorable. Out of nowhere, my husband lets out a HUGE sneeze. I mean so loud I think the neighbors heard it. Huge! The cat jumped straight up in the air from a dead sleep and fell right off the end of the bed. She just sat on the floor, dazed and confused, shaking her head and trying to figure out what just happened. We laughed so hard we cried! She didn’t come back to the bed for the rest of the night!

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I’ve always known; it’s just part of my soul. My mother would tell you that she knew from the time I learned to spell my name. I never stopped writing and I always had at least one book with me at all times. When I was about 7, I would call all my aunts and uncles to find out what was new then I would hand write a “family newsletter” for everyone and make my mom send them out to every family member.

When I was 10, my grandfather bought me an Underwood typewriter so I wouldn’t have to keep writing by hand. I guess he always knew too.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

I don’t really prioritize my bucket list; it’s just ongoing. But one thing I can’t wait to try is a hike down to Havasu Falls in the Grand Canyon. It’s at least a two-night camping trip to really enjoy it and I’m not much of a camper, but the trip is worth any struggle I may have to endure. I’m hoping to go in the next few years. If you haven’t heard of it, Google it. Now! You’ll be glad you did.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

Diva kitty sleeps all day and only bothers me when she’s hungry, and my snuggle buddy is usually outside. But if the weather’s bad and he has to be inside, he’s in my lap, tapping at my hand to stop working and pet him instead.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

I have 2 TBR lists. One for books and eBooks, one for audio. My book list has a couple of Agatha Christie’s, 3 books from authors who have visited or are about to visit my blog, several books from my Sisters-in-Crime friends, and a new-to-me series that someone recommended.

My audio list is almost complete, but Mary Burton just released a new book that I’m dying to check out and there’s a new David Baldacci book coming in November. I always drop everything to listen to his latest when it releases!

Biography: Samantha is a freelance writer and aspiring mystery author who shares her passion for all things mystery and tea on her blog Tea Cottage Mysteries.

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The Dogs in my Life: Part I – Sandy – by Judy Penz Sheluk

I was about eight-years-old when, after years of pestering them, my parents finally relented and bought me my first dog. A mutt of unidentified origins (though his color and feathered tail indicated a smattering of Golden Retriever), I imaginatively named him Sandy.

Like me, Sandy’s favorite place to go was our cottage on Gull River, near Norland, Ontario, where we could both run and play and swim to our heart’s content. I can remember paddling my rowboat up and down the river, Sandy sitting beside me, and thinking how lucky I was to have a best friend.

For the most part, Sandy was a good dog and a great companion, but every now and again he’d jump the fence in our backyard and disappear for a day or two. Today, I realize this behavior could have easily been corrected by having him neutered, but for whatever reason, my parents chose to leave him intact. That decision eventually caused Sandy is his life.

I remember the day an irate man came to our door. He told us that he was a breeder of purebred dogs, and the latest litter had a distinctly “Sandy” look to them. While that explained where Sandy had been, and what he’d been up to, the breeder made it very clear that our mongrel dog had cost him a lot of money, and he was furious about it.

Maybe things would have turned out differently if my mom had given the breeder some money,  but my father had recently died and we didn’t have a bean, let alone a pot to cook it in. As for taking the breeder’s name, address, and telephone number, it simply didn’t occur to us, probably because we were both  too intimidated to think clearly.

We kept Sandy tied up after that, even in the backyard, but one day Sandy broke his chain and jumped the fence again. Days went by and no Sandy. My mom and I scoured the neighborhood looking for him, put up posters, advertised in the local paper. Nothing. And then one day, while I was studying for exams, there was a scratching sound at the front door. When I opened it, I saw Sandy, badly beaten and lying in a pool of blood.

I called my mom and she left work and came home right away.  We took Sandy to the vet, who said Sandy had been whipped with a chain and beaten with something, most likely hockey stick. The vet told us that Sandy was lucky to be alive, having more than forty lacerations over his body and face, and his paws were worn raw, as if he’d walked for many miles to find his way back to us. I’ll never know where or how my mom came up with the money, but Sandy was stitched up, and the vet reported the incident to the Humane Society, not that anything came of that.

It took several weeks, but Sandy eventually healed, his fur growing in around the multiple wounds. He became the ultimate house pet, showing no signs of wanting to bolt, regardless of the season. He used to like to sit on the front porch with me and watch the people and cars go by.

I’ll never forget the day it happened. I popped into the house to get something, just for a minute, leaving Sandy on the porch, chained, but unattended. I heard him bark, a frantic bark…he never barked… By the time I got to the front door, Sandy was gone, a dark car pulling out of our driveway. I didn’t get a make or model. I didn’t get a license plate.

We never saw Sandy again, and I knew, no matter how long or how hard we looked, that this time Sandy was never coming home. He was seven-years-old.

I was fifteen the last time I petted Sandy, and to this day I can’t bring myself to imagine what happened to him. In fact, I debated writing such a sad story for my first post, but if Sandy’s story convinces even one dog owner about the importance of spaying and neutering, it will be worth it.

Find out more about Judy on her website, One Writer’s Journey

 

 

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An Interview with Lauren H., Puppy Trainer for Guiding Eyes for the Blind

Thanks, Lauren for visiting with Pens, Paws, and Claws this week. We’re excited to have you on our blog. Lauren is a rising college freshman who started training dogs in high school for Guiding Eyes for the Blind.

Tell us a little about yourself.

I graduated high school this past May and am attending classes at PVCC with the intention to transfer to another college after 2 years. I am most interested in becoming a counselor.

When did you know that you wanted to train dogs?

My mom and I stopped by the grocery store one evening to pick up a few items and saw a group of dogs being trained. I asked a few questions and left there knowing this was something that I desperately wanted to do.

How did you find out about Guiding Eyes for the Blind? 

After a Google search for possible guide/service dog training organizations, Guiding Eyes for the Blind was the only one that wrote back letting me know that they were more than happy to have a teenager join their region. The coordinator that responded let me know that all three of her children raised guide dogs when they were teenagers.

Could you tell us a little about the organization? And what kind of training did you have to go through to start?

Guiding Eyes for the Blind provides dogs free of charge to blind people. They breed the puppies themselves and then foster them out to puppy raisers for approximately 13-14 months. At that point, they return to the New York facility for more intensive training before being paired with a blind handler.

To become a raiser, I attended three, two-hour training sessions and did a 5 day in home trial with a 6 month old puppy that had been going through training in the area. Once we received the puppy, we attended a once a week training class with the puppy for 12 weeks and then big dog training classes every two weeks after that.

Did you get to name the puppies?

No, Guiding Eyes names the puppies. They have the puppies that are a part of a litter all start with the same letter.

How old were they when they started their training?

Depends on the puppy. I have seen them anywhere between 7 weeks to 10 weeks.

Tell us about Wheat your first dog and where he ended up? 

Not all dogs end up being a good match for a blind person. Guiding Eyes has other organizations/career possibilities for when that happens. Wheat let it be known that she was more interested in sniffing down and finding items. The Connecticut State Police showed a strong interest in her, so she now is in their training program. She is due to graduate in December at which point she will wear a vest, a badge, and will be referred to as Detective Wheat.

What breed is she?

She is a Yellow Labrador

Tell us about Nirvana. How long has she been with you? 

We picked up Nirvana on the way home from the New York facility. While we will always have a place in our hearts for Wheat, it was very nice to be able to immediately put all the work and training we had done to use on another dog. We have her for about a month now, and she is definitely a different personality. She is a very gentle soul.  You can almost see her thinking about what you have said and is processing all of the information.

What’s the breed?

She is a black Labrador

Do you have any other family pets? 

We have a 7 yr olds dog that is a beagle mix and a 6yr old Norwegian Forest Cat.

If so, how do they get along with the pups you train?

In general, they like the dogs. There were times that Wheat’s energy level would be a bit much. At those times, they would escape to a private area. Being that Nirvana is a little slower going, the cat has actually been seen cuddling up to her.

How do you socialize the dogs to be in crowds or around people?

They teach you to start out small. In the beginning, it may be good enough to just walk in the door, sit there for a few minutes and go back out again. From there, it’s baby steps.  As the dog is more comfortable, extend the amount of time and start walking around. As far as around people, there are two approaches. When walking past people, you call the dog’s name as you are passing by someone and have a “puppy party” when they focus on you instead of the people. A “puppy party” consists of a few treats while very excitedly praising her for being such a good girl. When people ask to greet her, we have them pet her while we feed her several treats. This helps teach her to pay attention to her handler no matter what.

What is a typical day like when you are training the dogs?

That can really change with age and what the individual dog needs to work on.  House manners, walking while checking in with their handler, and socialization are some of the more common things worked on.

How do you juggle training, volunteer work with school and your other activities?

Thankfully, my family has helped me by seeing to her needs while I am at school or if I need to be out of town. It is actually very good for her so that she remains flexible as to who is working with her. The Richmond Region also has a great network of Puppy sitters that help out when our family happens to go on a trip where we can’t take dogs with us.

How much time do you spend with the dog each day?

Again, it depends on the age. A younger puppy needs much more sleep, so training times are shorter. As the grow, they can handle a little longer. It can also depend on the state of mind of the dog. Training classes help teach you to read the signs of whether a dog is in a state of mind where they are receptive of learning or not.

Congratulations on your recent award! Could you tell us a little about that?

Thank you!  The award is the President’s Volunteer Service Award.  Honestly, I knew nothing about it. Jodi, our regional manager applied for it for myself and a few other teenagers in the Prince William area. I was speechless and very honored when she presented the award.

What two dog training tips would you give to pet owners?

1) Making sure your puppy has 10 minutes, three times a day of chew time on an appropriate dog toy will help to significantly reduce the chance of the pup chewing on other items.

2) Make sure whatever you allow your puppy do, that you will still be okay with them doing that same thing when they are full grown. Stopping what may be unwanted behaviors or habits upfront may save a lot of stress and extra work later.

Thanks, Lauren for visiting with us and telling us about your work with the puppies and Guiding Eyes for the Blind. And congratulations again on your President’s Volunteer Service Award!

Lauren and Wheat

 

 

 

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