Welcome Back, Susan Schwartz!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome author, Susan Schwartz and her kitties back to the blog.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing:

I began writing in 2006 with freelance articles. I wrote on all sorts of topics and researched these pieces thoroughly. I made some money, but I was more interested in fiction writing. I joined the Virginia Writers Club and started learning how to write with style. I found good mentors and people who wanted to help me succeed. I took over leadership of the club for two years giving back to the writing community and helping to mentor a few new writers.

I have been an Operating Room Nurse for 19 years. As you can imagine, I see many interesting and gory things while working. I channel many of those sights and sounds into my stories. I love blood and guts, and I tend to write stories where people are getting killed or maimed in some fashion. I also try to write them with a twist making you wonder what hit you at the end. I have enjoyed this genre immensely because of its ability to lead the reader into something they were not expecting.

I have three short stories published at present in the Nightmares & Echoes series. They are “The Sparkling Floor,” “I Thought You Did,” and “Blurred Line.  “Blurred Line” was nominated for a Bram Stoker Award in Long Fiction by the Horror Writers Association in 2016. My non-fiction piece in the Virginia Writers Club Centennial Anthology is titled “Using my Karate Chops in Nursing.” Paranormal Encounters just came out in March 2019. I also have a non-fiction book coming in May 2019 titled Haunted Charlottesville and Surrounding Counties. In addition, another haunted book is being published October 2019.

Please check out my website to see future happenings and new books coming out soon. https://www.susanschwartzauthor.com.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for your writing?

I have had up to 14 feral cats in the past. I also took care of a baby squirrel for several days and a silverback bat. We just lost the last one, Mr. Imp, in 2015. At present, we have two kitties, Speck & Manchego. We have multiple fish tanks, and we also love on one leopard gecko named Zoey.

I do not use them in my writing, but Zoey likes to help me write sometimes. She loves to write about cricket murder mysteries.

Here are some of our fishies:

Our eel, Houdini:

My three blood parrots (Sebastian, Scar, and Pierre) and pleco (Zeke), I sent this out as a Christmas picture one year because they apparently were singing along with the carols:

What are you reading now?

I tend to read three to four books at once. My list at present consists of:

Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly. It is the 2nd book in his Late Show series, but this one places Ballard and Bosch together for some crazy good fun.

 Macrame Murder by my great friend, Mollie Cox Bryan. She is a very sweet lady and an awesome writer of cozy mysteries.

 Italian Iced by Kylie Logan. Loving Italian cuisine and goodies, this one just piqued my interest with the title.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I am starting to research for another haunted book on another section of Virginia. I just had two stories come out in Paranormal Encounters in March. I have a paranormal romance novel that I have been working on for several years that I want to finish. I also have about six short stories in the works for a couple anthologies and just from pleasure writing.

Who is your favorite author and why?

For horror influences, I look to Stephen King and Bentley Little. The medical drama comes from Michael Palmer and Robin Cook. For general fiction, I like David Baldacci, Brad Parks, and Michael Connelly.

All of these produce a great story with plenty of red herrings to make you think something else is going to happen. Then they let slip that crucial detail that spends everything around and just leaves you so confused.

What ‘s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

Milo and Otis was definitely a favorite with the dog and the cat. I also so loved Homeward Bound. The voiceovers in both movies were simply the best. It always makes me wonder now when my cats are looking at me what they are thinking.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I started writing back in 2003 doing fanfic for several TV shows I watched at the time. They weren’t really great stories, but mainly continuations of what I thought should have happened. I really enjoyed writing the different views on some of the characters. Once these got some comments, I started wondering if I could write longer and more in-depth pieces. I am happy to say I can and I do.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

Manchego and Speck are normally chasing each other back and forth through the house. Manchego is around 18 months old, and we rescued her off the street on a cold winter’s night at the age of about two months. We found Speck at the Goochland Animal Shelter to help Manchego get over her separation anxiety. Speck is around nine months old, and he has been a welcome addition to the family. Although it did take about two weeks for Manchego to warm up to him.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

I thought about this one. These weren’t really pets, but I took care of them for a length of time. We had a baby squirrel named Lucky that had fallen out of his nest, and his mother never came to find him. My father, knowing my love of animals, called me to come get him and take care of him. It was a fun experience for about four days until we found a Wildlife Rehabilitator that would take him. Fun Fact: Squirrels are lactose-intolerant.

The second unusual animal we loved on was a Silverback Bat. This guy had fallen on our front porch and didn’t move. We were worried he was dead. We got a plastic container, much like the ones we kept crickets in for our gecko, and scooped him up with it. Over time, he started to move by hopping, so we named him Scooter. We also took care of him for several days until we could find a Bat Rehabilitator in the area. We discovered that he had burned up one wing. If he couldn’t fly, he couldn’t hunt for food. Sadly, he passed away a couple days later. I still have fond memories of him though, and I love to walk at dusk to see the bats flying. Fun Fact: Bats look just like puppy dogs in the face. Check out some pictures.

What advice would you give someone who wants to be a writer?

The best advice given to me by many authors in different genres is to read that which you are trying to write. The greats in this genre, such as Stephen King, Bentley Little, and Richard Laymon, have shown me how to write and what people are looking for when they read this genre. Stephen King also wrote a book, On Writing, which has helped me a great deal as well.

Write what you know and love. Writing becomes much easier when you know where you want to go with a particular piece. I always know the ending. I leave my title for when I finish because you want to write a great story, and then finish it with a title that encompasses all that is inside.

Don’t stop because someone told you No. This just means you have to go another way instead of the path you are taking. Keep trying and don’t give up. You can do it!

About Susan

I have been an avid writer for around 13 years doing everything from writing freelance articles to editing manuscripts for other authors. I also love to write horror stories that have a twist at the end.

My alter ego is an Operating Room Nurse/Nurse Educator who loves creating tales from the interesting and weird things I have seen. I am a member of the Horror Writers Association and the Virginia Writers Club where I serve as President of the Richmond Chapter and 1st Vice-President of the state organization. I have two novels in the works, a paranormal romance and a medical thriller. My non-fiction book, Haunted Charlottesville, is being released in May 2019.

Please see my website for more info: www.susanschwartzauthor.com

Please follow and like us:
error

A New Puppy by Sheri Levy

After our older dogs, Jake, a black Labrador, and Sydney, our first Australian shepherd; passed on to doggie heaven, we adopted an eight-week-old, Aussie, we named Donovan. He was a beautiful, puppy with lots of splotches of white and copper and loving, amber eyes.

It didn’t take long to pick up on his strengths and weaknesses. Sydney, our first Aussie, learned every word we spoke. My husband and I had started spelling. Sydney picked up on our spelling and we laughed when he recognized our words. We no longer had secrets.

Donavan didn’t have the ability to learn as fast as we expected. We loved his sweet temperament, but his hyper-activity kept us on our toes. He didn’t learn his limitations and would leave our front yard to go visit with the neighborhood children.

We decided Donavan needed a playmate. A friend sent us a brief email brief–“This male dog needs to be rescued.”

The photo of a stunning, tri-colored Australian shepherd with one pastel, Carolina-sky, blue eye and other dark amber filled my screen. The markings on his face looked as if they had been hand-painted.

Straight through the computer screen, the Aussie’s eyes connected to mine. Curiosity defeated my reservations. I inhaled, requested information, and hit ‘send.’ What could a few questions hurt?

Two days later, we arrived at the owners’ home. A teen girl eventually caught the terrified dog and dumped him on their front yard. He shuddered being touched, but Murphy held him. We agreed he needed immediate help.

Driving home, Murphy grinned. “There’s a term, “Mulligan,” golfers use when they take a, ‘Do Over.’ What about naming him, Mulligan?”

I cradled Mulligan. “Perfect! He’s getting a second chance.”

My husband added an electric fence to our large backyard and I trained the dogs to stay in our yard. Mulligan understood but Donavan was resistant. As I worked upstairs in my office, writing, Donavan crept across the fence, and Mulligan followed. I went outside to check on the dogs and they were gone. I caught my breath and my heart trembled.

Friends helped Murphy and me look for our dogs. We lived out in the country, with lots of open land. Murphy started searching close to home. My friends walked and drove around different streets, calling them by name. As the evening grew dark, we knew there was no more time to look. Terrified, we hoped they’d come home for dinner. But that didn’t happen.

In the morning, our wonderful friends started looking again. We walked the empty fields and in the woods around the neighborhood. A few hours later my phone dinged. Murphy called and I nervously jabbered about all of our friends looking for the dogs.

He caught his breath and added. “I found Donavan miles away on a very busy street.” He paused and I heard him inhale. “He was hit by a truck and is dead on the side of the road. I’m bringing him home. I have no idea where Mulligan is.” And he hung up.

I stood on the driveway and waited for him to return. We both cried while Murphy buried Donavan.

“I’m going to look for Mulligan.” I drove up our long street and noticed a black dog curled-up in a grassy front yard. I pulled onto the drive way and got out of the car. I called “Mulligan.” His head lifted. He was so exhausted from running he didn’t move.

I sat next to Mulligan and poured my bottle of water into a bowl I’d brought. He slurped happily and after a few minutes he stood. Before we adopted Mulligan, we had learned he had been hit by a man with a stick. It didn’t take long to understand his fear of Murphy.

Two weeks later, Murphy said, “Mulligan is probably going to be your dog and I am going to need a puppy.”

My heart sank. “Okay. I understand.”

Murphy researched a litter of Aussie puppies and we drove to Georgia. Mulligan rode with us in the car and he played with the other dogs while Murphy chose his new puppy. He picked a black and white-merle Aussie. I drove home and Murphy held Slater, who looked like a piece of marble slate.

At home, Murphy sat on the den floor, and played tug with Slater. Silently, Mulligan left his safe place under our dining room table. He stood at the opening to the kitchen, spying on Murphy and Slater interacting. A couple of minutes passed. Mulligan slinked through the kitchen, sloth-like, and slipped into the den. His eyes never shifted from Murphy. I sat in my chair holding my breath. I didn’t say a word. My hand covered my racing heart.

Mulligan sauntered up to Murphy, plopped his bottom on the floor, inches from Murphy’s torso. Mulligan’s eyes focused on Slater and then back to Murphy. His head tilted with each of their playful movements. Seconds later, Mulligan leaned over Murphy and licked his forehead, ears and cheek.

Murphy stopped playing with Slater and his eyes filled with emotion, as did mine.

This had to have been a present from above. An episode Murphy nor I could ever have imagined. Murphy had broken through Mulligan’s fear with Slater’s help.

These two dogs have been brothers for eleven years. Our days with these two special dogs are counting down. Mulligan turned into a very loving and secure dog. Slater had cancer and has totally recovered.

We are enjoying every moment with these guys and will forever cherish our memories.

by Sheri Levy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
error

Gibbs Announces an Audiobook Giveaway

Leroy Jethro “Gibbs” reporting in with some great news. My human, Judy Penz Sheluk, has just released the audiobook version of Past & Present, Book 2 in her Marketville Mystery series and she’s got 1 free download code for US/Canada Audible members and 1 free download code for UK Audible members for two lucky listeners. Narrated by Kelli Lindsay, here’s a bit about it:

Sometimes the past reaches out to the present…
It’s been thirteen months since Calamity (Callie) Barnstable inherited a house in Marketville under the condition that she search for the person who murdered her mother thirty years earlier. She solves the mystery, but what next? Unemployment? Another nine-to-five job in Toronto?
Callie decides to set down roots in Marketville, take the skills and knowledge she acquired over the past year, and start her own business: Past & Present Investigations.
It’s not long before Callie and her new business partner, best friend Chantelle Marchand, get their first client: a woman who wants to find out everything she can about her grandmother, Anneliese Prei, and how she came to a “bad end” in 1956. It sounds like a perfect first assignment. Except for one thing: Anneliese’s past winds its way into Callie’s present, and not in a manner anyone—least of all Callie—could have predicted.

If you’d like to listen to a 5-minute sample, click here.

PS: the audiobook is also available for purchase on Audible, Amazon and iTunes.

*For a chance to win, please leave a comment requesting UK or US/Canada code. Winners will be notified by May 1st. Note you must be an Audible member to use the code. 

Please follow and like us:
error

Welcome, J. L. Canfield!

Pens, Paws, and Claws welcomes J. L. Canfield.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Hello, I am originally from Jacksonville, Florida, was raised in Wilmington, North Carolina, have lived in upstate New York, (Clifton Park, a suburb north of Albany), Portsmouth, VA, Charlotte, NC, and now reside in the Richmond, VA area.

I am an award-winning writer of mysteries and women’s fiction.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

I have two dogs, a Cavachon (female)and a Cavapoo (male). They are my only family and my muses. I did use them in a children’s story I wrote for a kid lit class I took. But they have not made an appearance yet in any work. Spoiler alert: That changes in book three of my mystery series. In the women’s fiction which will be released in May, a golden retriever named Tucker does play a role in a decision the female lead makes regarding the next step in her life.

What are you reading now?

I have been working my way through Bernhard Cornwell’s The Saxon Tales series, but I needed a break from that, so I am now reading Jacqueline Winspear’s In This Grave Hour.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I am finishing up book two in the detective mystery series starring Philip Samyn and have sketched out ideas for his next story. I am in the research and plotting phase of another women’s fiction which I will begin writing this summer, if not before.

How do you use animals in your writing? Are they a character in their own right or just mentioned in passing?

Animals are a physical extension of humans and feelings. For me, my dogs got me through my divorce. My ex-husband and I fought over them. He wanted, in our settlement papers, to have the first right to them when I realized I wouldn’t be able to afford to keep them. I counter with a demand for puppy support in exchange for visitation twice a month. He dropped the issue. In the upcoming Icy Roads story, the young woman who is the central character is dealing with ever-changing problems in her marriage. She really wishes she had a dog both in her happy state and more so when her marriage falls apart.

In the third book of the Samyn mystery series, he too will be changing things in his life, and I have plans for an animal, not sure what species yet to appear in his world.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

My father shielded me from many childhood stories and books with animals. Usually, it was the ones where the animal dies (think Bambi, Sounder). I was a very tender-hearted child. I wouldn’t eat pork (he had a farm with pigs) or deer meat ( I often saw deers up close), and I would cry when their meat was in the house. So my favorite movie is Who Framed Roger Rabbit? I wanted to see it since Bob Hoskins was in it and I admired his acting. Also, it intrigued me this concept of live action sharing screen time with animation. I think it’s funny, well written, with gifted actors pulling this together.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

My father bought my mother for their anniversary precisely what she wanted, a white German Shepherd. It was a beautiful puppy which she named Rascal Von Stuckey. However, the dog really didn’t like her, and it really disliked my half-brothers. It bonded with me though. Maybe because I was the smallest in the house and its instinct to protect me when my father was away. I don’t know. What I do know is the dog stayed by me whenever I was home which was great since my brothers loved making me cry. When I was five or six, I contracted mumps on both sides of my face. Rascal stayed in my room. He would not go out unless I stood on the porch so he could see me. We also found out he would not take food from anyone except me. My father was a huge man who most people found intimidating. He stood over 6’ had a shaved head, and weighed around 250 or so. Since my mother’s teenage sons were afraid to feed him, my mother had managed to do so once when she got him on the porch and threw food out the window to him. My father was home and said he would take over my chore until I was well. My father’s hand spread from pinkie to thumb was about 12 inches. He opened Rascals food, leaned over to place it in his bowl and Rascal took my father’s hand and his food in his mouth. When my father managed to pull his hand out of the dog’s mouth, he came into my room and told me it didn’t matter that I was sick, I would have to feed the dog. Someone would get the food in the bowl, but I would have to put it down for Rascal.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I wrote my first play when I was six and in second grade. I was a ferocious reader, and the idea of creating stories fascinated me. I wanted to do it. Every year in elementary school I wrote a class play. In middle school, I worked on the school newspaper because I then wanted to be an investigative reporter thanks to the movie All The President’s Men. High School, I took creative writing and theatre classes. During college, I took writing classes but was told by my mother (who wasn’t paying for my education) not to major in writing because I would never make money at it. One of the BAs I received was in Broadcast Journalism. I considered it a compromise. It wasn’t until my divorce that I rediscovered my passion for writing. It helped me get through a four-year war with my ex. It gave me outlets for my emotions. It wasn’t until I received the PenCraft award that I could say the word author. It took a lifetime for me to think I could write and people would like it. All I ever knew was after I did a good day of writing, I walked away with the best high in the world.

What do your pets do when you are writing?

My Cavachon, Baroness Sassafrass Von Brong, and Cavapoo Sir Remington J. Wigglesby lay on their bed under my desk or on the daybed I have in my writing room. They are always near me ready to listen when I need to read a passage out loud.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

Think hard about it. Writing is not for those who dream of big dollar signs and fame. Most writers do not earn enough to live on, and that’s according to statistics. If you are a person who cannot take rejection or critical commentary of your work, then avoid being a writer. If you have difficulty in thinking up story ideas along with plots and twists, then think twice about writing.

Writing is painting pictures in readers heads with words. Like other artists, writers struggle for an audience, for being satisfied with their creations, with self-doubt, with acceptance, with selling their work, but those who know the only way they can achieve a personal sense of a euphoria that comes from crafting something from nothing are ones who were gifted with the skills needed to be a writer. If that describes you, then dive in. Just make sure you’re doing this for the right reasons, working to become something you love, not to live out a fantasy you have. Writing is tough, it’s harder than reading a book. But it is to me the best job in the world.

About Julie:

J.L.Canfield was born in Florida, raised in North Carolina, lived for a short time in upstate New York and now resides in the Richmond, VA area with her two dogs, Sassie and Remy. When not planted behind her laptop harvest words from her brain, she’s outside with a camera trying to capture the beauty she finds in nature. When possible she’s busy sleeping in the sun while baking on a beach.

Let’s Be Social:

Facebook

Twitter 

Web

LinkedIn

Medium

Amazon Book Link: What Hides Beneath

https://amzn.to/2GtBHIM 

http://www.blackrosewriting.com/literary/whathidesbeneath.

Icy Roads Preorder link:

http://www.blackrosewriting.com/literary/icyroads.

Please follow and like us:
error

Welcome, Ajesh Sharma!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Ajesh Sharma to the blog!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I was born in the Indian capital of New Delhi and finished school in Kolkata. I started my career in that city as a techie, designing software systems. I founded and ran a software products company for a decade before moving to Canada in 1997.

I started writing about 8 or 9 years ago and realized I didn’t know what to write and had no idea what my style or voice was. I then developed my blog, currently www.sloword.com, as a means to learn how to write, starting out writing poetry as well as stories from my life. I created multiple characters and tried different styles.

In 2014 I wrote a short story, which I showed a friend. She encouraged me to develop it and it grew into my biggest work so far, “A Couple of Choices”. This is a 3-Act play, self-published on Amazon Kindle in December 2017. I have also had a couple of short stories published in a couple of online magazines.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

One Bluish Egg – is my autobiography, up to the point I landed in Canada. It stands at around 72k words, but needs editing and some additional chapters. It focuses mostly on my career and the interesting people I have met and strange situations I have been in.

Angler on the Credit and Other Stories – A collection of short stories.

Seriously Awful Poems – is a collection of poetry, some very serious and solemn with some humorous ones mixed in.

Who is your favorite author and why?

I have many that absolutely did influence my days as a reader. James Herriot, the Yorkshire vet and his tales of the people and animals he met in his life was a well-loved and well-regarded author. Today, I would say that PG Wodehouse stands out as the ultimate in writing class. His wordplay, the classical references used to great effect to bring out the humor in the situation and his ability to construct a sentence are unparalleled.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

When I was about 4 years old, I remember being taken to see a litter of guinea pig sized creatures. One of them came home with us. He grew fast. He loved milk and the sound of my mother pouring his milk out would see him racing away to the kitchen. He would then remember that he was not allowed into the kitchen itself, so he would come to a sliding stop just outside the door, panting with excitement. My oldest sister didn’t believe we needed a dog, so we gave him away, to a neighbor. We kids would walk to school and he was there in the morning, bounding up to the gate of his new house, barking greetings at us, growing up fast into the Alsatian he was.

What’s your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

Animal Farm. The old horse, Boxer, to my mind, symbolizes the people who lose the most, yet are the ones who go to their doom still proclaiming their faith. I find that the saddest yet truest human frailty.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

Back in high school, in my final year, I competed for the school’s two-man debating team. I came third and thus didn’t make it. I was asked, however, to write an essay on the motion to help the team. I did and sent it in. I heard nothing more about it for a week. Then one day Hindi language teacher, looked at me, nodded and said “Oh, Sharma, I hear you write essays.. interesting.”

In my final year of school, I wrote a badly concocted extended skit for the annual teachers day celebration. It was a day when the students put up shows for the benefit of the teachers. This was banned by the Jesuit Rector on the ground that it may be offensive to some.

These two episodes stand out. Between 1978 and 2010, however, I wrote nothing except consulting reports. I read that and realize I never really knew I was a writer and still don’t!

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

I’d like to see one of my plays on stage. By far, that would be fantastic!

There are other things, like visiting Bethel, NY to see the site of the Woodstock which I did 43 years to the day late. Also, last year, I walked across the Abbey Road zebra crossing!

What do your pets do when you are writing?

I don’t have pets. I do have a grand-doggie, a pug, who comes visiting sometimes. Usually, she is content to sit right next to me and snore away.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have?

The Collected Short Stories of Saki ( HH Munro )

Antrobus Collection by Lawrence Durrell

Collected works of James Thurber

I have only one TBR.

What are two things you know now that you wish you knew when you started writing?

It takes more than writing ability. The friends you think you had won’t usually be there to help mobilize support. At least, in my case, that it true. People will say nice things about your writing and gush about how much they loved it, maybe on social media, however, this doesn’t translate to exposure / sales. You need one or two very influential people in your corner to publicize your work.

Being able to market your work without self-deprecation and spamming is hard! Balancing self-doubt with a brazen sales pitch isn’t easy.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to be a writer?

I’m almost tempted to say “Don’t!”. But in all fairness, enjoy your writing first. You should be able to read what you wrote and like it. It should make you laugh, cry, drive some emotion. That means you’ve found your voice, usually.

What is one lesson you learned about writing or publishing that you’d like to share?

Read. Read a lot of different types. Read blogs, interact with the writers there. Explore, assimilate by osmosis so that your unique style becomes a part of you, unforced, natural and unmistakably you.

About Ajesh:

Ajesh Sharma, is a Canadian author and playwright. His short stories have appeared in The Telegram Magazine and Unbound eMagazine. A Couple of Choices is his first play.

He uses his blog, www.sloword.com, to showcase his love for wordplay and humor, his intense dislike for cats and his fanatical adoration of okra.

When not wearing colorful socks or attempting to play guitar, he tries to read, write, learn photography and spend time with one wife, two grown up sons, one daughter-in-law and her dog on the outskirts of Toronto, Canada.

He can be found here:

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17494625.Ajesh_Sharma

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Ajesh-Sharma/e/B07JYJJ31F?ref=dbs_p_ebk_r00_abau_000000

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sloman2608

Bookbub: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/ajesh-sharma

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AjeshBSharma/

 

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
error