Welcome, Terri M. Collica

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome author Terri M. Collica to the blog this week.

Thank you, Heather, for having me on your blog. I’m really honored to be interviewed.

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

I grew up in a small idyllic town in Northwestern Kentucky just minutes away from the Ohio River. I remember spending many Sunday afternoons fishing with my parents. I’d watch the bobber on my wooden fishing pole hoping to catch a big one. I still love rivers.

When I was five, my mother took me to visit my aunt in West Palm Beach, Florida. I can still remember being lifted skyward by the two women right as the incoming wave reached me. What a thrill! I knew then that I would someday live near the ocean. Soon after graduating college, I moved to Palm Beach County – home to Mar-a-Lago, hanging chads and lots of mystery fodder.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

There are four cats who allow my husband and me to live in their house. They have somehow convinced us to eagerly attend to their every need. Torti, is the head honcho and has been since she convinced us to adopt her and her kitten, Slippers, after someone abandoned them off the Florida Turnpike. The two longhairs, Autumn Leaves and Curly Whiskers abide by the shorthairs’ rules. Somehow, I’ve managed to schedule my life, so I can write and still cater to the felines’ whims. Curly Whiskers has even agreed to appear in one of my upcoming mysteries, but only if she gets to approve the final manuscript.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

Service dogs abound in the Sunny McBain Mystery series. Dickens is Sunny’s guide dog, and he plays a major part in both Fuzzy Visions and Family Visions. He’s a beautiful golden retriever, and I’ve shed a few tears writing some scenes involving him and Sunny.

Sunny’s oldest friend is a good-looking deaf boy who travels with his hearing-ear dog, Chaucer. The two dogs provide some comic relief when it is most needed in the mysteries.

What are you reading now?

I just finished a fabulous young adult mystery by Karen M. McManus titled One of Us Is Lying. Wow! The plotting, characterization and pacing was remarkable. I’d like to be able to clone her writing technique for my next novel.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m currently working on two projects. Christmas Visions will be the third book in the Sunny McBain Mystery series. It is due to be released in July as a Christmas-in-July event. Two new service dogs will be arriving in the novel. Mugsie, a yellow lab, and Gabriel, a black lab.

I’m also writing an adult cozy with a working title of Clancy’s Dilemma. My beautiful kitty, Curly Whiskers, will make her appearance in the novel.

Who is your favorite author and why?

Oh my, this is not an easy question to answer. As far as the classics, I love Charles Dickens. A Tale of Two Cities is my all-time favorite book. For an entertaining cozy mystery with lots of lovable dogs, I read David Rosenfelt’s Andy Carpenter series. I also wait for new books from Heather Blake, Maggie Pill, Hank Phillipe Ryan and Charles Finch.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

I always had a pet cat while growing up. A little black kitten named Inky was my first. Then there was Caesar, Elke, and well, you get the picture. There were family dogs too, but they were claimed by my brothers. However, I still insist they liked me better than my pesky little brothers.

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

The Sunny McBain Mystery series is about a remarkable blind girl who with the help of her guide dog solves mysteries. Although the stories are fiction, I try to make the interaction between Sunny and her service dog as authentic as possible. Researching the relationship between guide dogs and their handlers has given me the opportunity to learn about, and get to know, several real guide dogs and their blind handlers. I am thankful for every moment I can spend in their company. Seeing Eye dogs are the most loving and intelligent creatures on earth. They are truly the “neurosurgeons” of canines.

What is your favorite book or movie that had an animal as a central character? Why?

I love animals. Any novel featuring one as a major character in the story draws me in. That said, I can’t watch any movie or TV show where a beloved animal is hurt, suffers, and/or dies. Lassie was a real tearjerker for me, and my mother finally refused to let me view it. Once, I was trapped on an airplane during an overseas flight. They were showing the film, Marley & Me. Blubbering during most of the movie, I finally had to hide out in the plane’s restroom.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

Soon after moving to Florida, I learned an important lesson about cats. They will defend their home against any intruder that’s no bigger than they are. Or at least my kitty, P.C., felt this way when a skunk got into my small, rundown rental. It was late one evening and the battle only lasted a few minutes before Mr. Skunk hightailed it out the same way he came in. P.C. had defended her home, but not before the enemy had sprayed his “beyond skunk” aroma throughout our small cabin.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

There’s just one thing on my bucket list. I’m sure it will sound esoteric to some, and just plain stupid to others, but here it is. I’d like to live peacefully in every moment knowing it’s all good and exactly as it should be. (Oh, and by the way, I’m so far from that now, it’s just plain scary!)

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

I once had a Guinea pig who was the meanest, most ornery rodent I’d ever encountered. I had personally picked her out after seeing how loving and sweet my best friend’s Guinea pig was. I was sure she’d be the same. Although she was beautiful with every color known to her species, she was a holy terror. She refused to let anyone pick her up or pet her. Feeding her was a scary encounter as she’d bite the hands that were trying to fill her food bowls. Finally, I decided my little pet was just too nervous, hyper and scared to be tamed. I still cried when I returned her to the pet store.

About Terri Collica:

Terri graduated with a bachelor’s degree in secondary education before going on to her master’s degree in special education. She dedicated her career to teaching English to both mainstreamed and learning disabled students.

In addition to her mystery novels, Collica has self-published a locally distributed quarterly magazine dedicated to old-fashioned holiday celebrations, vintage decorations, and crafts. She has also had the opportunity to interview numerous famous musicians for local magazines.

To Buy Terri’s Books:

Fuzzy Visions

Family Visions

 

Let’s Be Social…

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Pinterest

Please follow and like us:

Mysteries Need Cats

Want to make a good mystery even better? Add a cat.

Seriously.

Many mystery series feature feline companions. The most famous one is The Cat Who … series, created by the late Lilian Jackson Braun. The stories feature reporter Jim Qwilleran and his Siamese cats, Kao K’o-Kung (Koko for short) and Yum Yum. Koko has a “sixth sense” that gives him stellar powers of detection.

Shirley Rousseau Murphy also anthropomorphizes her feline detective, Joe Grey, P.I. I was on an Alaskan cruise a few years back and borrowed Cat Pay the Devil from the ship’s library. I had to return the book when the cruise ended but purchased a copy as soon as I got home. It’s a truly charming series.

Midnight Louie is Carole Nelson Douglas’s feline super sleuth. Rita Mae Brown’s Mrs. Murphy even speaks!

But cats have their paws full with sleeping and begging for food, so some leave the detecting to their human companions. Lydia Adamson, Susan Wittig Albert, Linda Palmer, Gillian Roberts, and Rosemary Stevens are just a few of the authors who feature cats as “window dressing.” Often literally, as cats like to perch on window ledges, watching the world go by.

Just as my two, Morris and Olive, stole my heart, they also stole the heart of Hazel Rose, the title sleuth in my Hazel Rose Book Group series. Shammy and Daisy lived with me before crossing the rainbow bridge and live on in my series. Read about Shammy here. None of my cats detect (Olive hunts down mice and voles, but shies away from killers).

Upcoming posts: dogs in mysteries (I can’t forget our canine friends); and more on the cats in my Hazel Rose Book Group series.

What are your favorite cat mysteries?

Morris and Olive

Maggie King is the author of the Hazel Rose Book Group mysteries, including Murder at the Book Group and Murder at the Moonshine Inn. She has contributed stories to the Virginia is for Mysteries anthologies and to the 50 Shades of Cabernet anthology.

Maggie is a member of Sisters in Crime, James River Writers, and the American Association of University Women. She has worked as a software developer, retail sales manager, and customer service supervisor. Maggie graduated from Elizabeth Seton College and earned a B.S. degree in Business Administration from Rochester Institute of Technology. She has called New Jersey, Massachusetts, and California home. These days she lives in Richmond, Virginia with her husband, Glen, and cats, Morris and Olive. She enjoys reading, walking, movies, traveling, theatre, and museums.

Website: http://www.maggieking.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MaggieKingAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaggieKingAuthr

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/authormaggieking/

Amazon author page: http://amzn.to/2Bj4uIL

 

Please follow and like us:

Welcome, Kris Bock!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Twenty years ago, I started writing for children, using the name Chris Eboch. I have eight middle grade novels (for ages 9 to 12) published under that name. I also write a lot of educational nonfiction under the name MM Eboch.

Around 2008, I was starting to feel restless and wanted a change. I realized I had mostly been reading adult romantic suspense novels, so I started writing those under the name Kris Bock. The Mad Monk’s Treasure follows the hunt for a long-lost treasure in the New Mexico desert. In The Dead Man’s Treasure, estranged relatives compete to reach a buried treasure by following a series of complex clues. Whispers in the Dark features archaeology and intrigue among ancient Southwest ruins. In Counterfeits, stolen Rembrandt paintings bring danger to a small New Mexico town.

So I have over 50 published books now, but that includes fiction and nonfiction, for children and adults. The variety keeps me interested!

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

We got our first two ferrets in 2012. Zonks and Rico came as a pair. Ferrets don’t live very long, unfortunately, especially when you get them as older rescues, so we’ve loved and lost two more since then. We’ve had our current two, Teddy Black Bear (Bear) and Princess Pandemonium (Panda) since August. They love to wrestle and to sleep cuddled together. I have yet to use a ferret in one of my books, but I’m sure I will someday.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

I have three novels about treasure hunting in the Southwest. Each has a different main couple, but some characters show up in each book. The Mad Monk’s Treasure introduces two friends, Erin and Camie, and Camie’s oversized orange cat Tiger. Camie and Tiger help out in The Dead Man’s Treasure, and they’re the main characters – along with a love interest for Camie, Ryan – in The Skeleton Canyon Treasure. I think Tiger may be my most popular character of all. He goes hiking with Camie and has been known to attack intruders. Some people think his behavior is unrealistic, while others swear they’ve known a cat just like him.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

I’m polishing a mystery about a former war correspondent who returns to her childhood home after an injury and uncovers a mystery at the Alzheimer’s care unit where her mother resides. It’s intended to be the first in a series with the same main character.

Who is your favorite author and why?

It’s too hard to choose! I like romantic suspense and mystery, but nothing too gruesome. I don’t need dead bodies strewn on every page. That’s why I’m a fan of classic romantic suspense by authors such as Mary Stewart and Barbara Michaels.

Do you have any working or service animals in your stories? Tell us about them.

Not exactly, but some years back I spent time with a man who raises falcons and hawks and went on a few hunts with him. What We Found was inspired by finding a dead body while hiking and also includes falconry. It’s real-life adventures like these, both good and bad, that make New Mexico a great place for a writer!

In What We Found, set in a small town in central New Mexico, a young woman stumbles on a dead body in the woods. Audra gets drawn into the investigation, but more than one person isn’t happy about her bringing a murder to light. Fortunately, she has some allies, including her brainy 12-year-old brother and self-appointed sidekick, Ricky. And because this is suspense with a dose of romance, she has a love interest, Kyle, whose grandmother owns falcons and hawks. Audra accompanies Kyle on a falcon hunt. This scene is closely based my experiences with a falconer:

We strode across the desert, angling to pass by bushy patches where rabbits might be hiding. The hawk flew ahead again, soaring about twenty feet above the ground before landing on a small tree. She waited until we passed by, then made another hop, farther that time. Kyle raised his left arm to shoulder height. The hawk flew back and landed. Watching her come in sent a strange breathless thrill through my chest. I’d seen owls and eagles fairly close in the zoo, but there they were sitting quietly on perches. This was a glimpse of something wild and beautiful.

A jackrabbit bolted out of a bush twenty paces ahead. The hawk took off after it.

Seconds later, she swooped down behind some bushes several hundred feet away. She rose up, made a small loop, and dropped down again. Something shrieked.

Kyle was already running toward the action. By the time I got there, he had the hawk on his arm again. She had a feather sticking out awkwardly from her wing. I didn’t see the rabbit and wondered if Kyle had hidden it to make it easier on me.

“She got beat up,” Kyle said. “That rabbit had some moves.”

“It got away?”

He nodded and plucked a small tuft of gray fur from the bush. “She made contact. But this time, it looks like the rabbit won.” He opened his fingers and the small tuft of fur drifted away on the breeze.

“The rabbit won!”

“It happens sometimes. Fortunately for our girl, she won’t starve.” He looked into her black eyes. “It’s frozen quail for you tonight, my dear.”

The falconry aspect helped me develop thematic elements of What We Found, added some action, and provided readers with insight into an usual pastime. One reader wrote, “The falconry aspect was almost as intriguing as the unveiling of the murderer!”

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

The ferrets stay in a playpen during the day. It’s not really safe to let them run all over the house, as they’re so small that they could get into things and you might wind up stepping on them or sitting on them when they’re under a couch cushion. My home office looks out on New Mexico nature, complete with distracting wildlife such as roadrunners, quail, hummingbirds, and foxes. When I need a break, I can go cuddle the furkids.

What’s the most unusual pet you’ve ever had?

Most people seem to think ferrets are pretty unusual! I also had a rat when I was in high school. They make good pets.

Kris Bock writes novels of suspense and romance with outdoor adventures and Southwestern landscapes. Fans of Mary Stewart, Barbara Michaels, and Terry Odell will want to check out Kris Bock’s romantic adventures. “Counterfeits is the kind of romantic suspense novel I have enjoyed since I first read Mary Stewart’s Moonspinners.” 5 Stars – Roberta at Sensuous Reviews blog

Kris writes for children under the name Chris Eboch. Her novels for ages nine and up include The Genie’s Gift, a fantasy adventure drawing on the Arabian Nights stories; The Eyes of Pharaoh, a mystery that brings ancient Egypt to life; and The Well of Sacrifice, an action-packed drama set in ninth-century Mayan Guatemala.

Chris’s book Advanced Plotting helps writers fine-tune their plots, while You Can Write for Children: How to Write Great Stories, Articles, and Books for Kids and Teenagers offers great insight to beginning and intermediate writers. Learn more at https://chriseboch.com/ or her Amazon page, or check out her writing tips at her Write Like a Pro! blog.

Let’s Be Social:

Kris Bock website

Kris Bock Blog: The Southwest Armchair Traveler

Kris Bock’s Amazon page

Kris Bock’s Newsletter signup

Kris Bock on GoodReads

Kris Bock on Facebook

Kris Bock on Twitter

Kris Bock on Pinterest

Please follow and like us:

Welcome, Debra Sennefelder!

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Debra Sennefelder to the blog. Congratulations on your new release!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing.

Born and raised in New York City, I now live in Connecticut with my family which includes two slightly spoiled Shih-Tzus, Susie and Billy. They are my writing companions, though they sleep a lot on the job. When I’m not writing I love to bake, hang with the pups, read or exercise. Over the years I’ve worked in pre-hospital care, retail and publishing. Currently I’m writing full-time. I write two mystery series, The Food Blogger Mystery series and the Kelly Quinn Mystery series.

 Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing?

Susie and Billy are the only pets we have now. Susie is 14 years old and Billy is 13 years old. Susie is full of life. She loves to walk and meet people. She gets miffed when someone doesn’t pay attention to her. She’s so funny. She loves a good game of tug of war and she loves to roll around on the grass. Billy has lost his sight due to genetic condition so he’s not as playful these days, but he enjoys walking outdoors and he’s never too far from me.  He’s a little trooper. Over the years we’ve had pet ducks, 9 in total. We got them as ducklings and raised them and at one point 2 of them needed to recuperate (one had a broken leg and the other had an infection) so they had to live in our house. That was an interesting period of time. The cat, we had Howard for 14 years, was not amused by the ducks. We’ve also had two Prairie Dogs, awesome pets by the way, and a hedgehog we rescued. Her name was Tiggy. Sadly, she’d been sick and died eleven months after we took her in. Right now the only pet that is a model in my writing is Howard. He appears in the Kelly Quinn books. He was a friendly, orange cat that liked to cuddle. It’s been 14 years since he’s passed so I’m able to write about him. I’ve chosen not to include Susie and Billy in any books at this time, perhaps in the future.

 Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names?

In The Uninvited Corpse there are two dogs. Bigelow is on the cover of the book and he’s a charmer with bad manners. Bigelow is a Beagle so he’s very friendly and playful and a handful. Buddy is a Golden Retriever who lives down the street from Hope Early and visits during his long walks with his owner. Howard is an orange cat that will be in the Kelly Quinn books.

 What are you reading now?

I’m always working my way through my massive TBR list. I’m reading I Know What You Bid Last Summer, a Sarah Winston Garage Sale Mystery, by Sherry Harris.

What writing projects are you currently working on?

 ’m working on the third book in the Food Blogger Mystery series. The second book, The Hidden Corpse, will be available in early 2019. I’ve also just submitted the first book in The Kelly Quinn mystery series to my editor. The title of that book hasn’t been confirmed yet.

Who is your favorite author and why?

That’s a difficult question to answer. I have so many favorite authors. I have a bunch of authors who are an automatic buy, when they have a new book I’m preordering it. Those authors include Sherry Harris, V.M. Burns, Katherine Hall Page, Bethany Blake, Krista Davis, Jenn McKinlay, Ellie Ashe.

 Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

Growing up we had a German Shepard named Lady and a cat named Tiger. Lady was sweet and she was very protective. Tiger only liked my mother. I remember a lot of hissing from her. When I was a teenager we got another dog, a Doberman Pinscher named Coffee, she was a rescue and incredibly lovable.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

When Susie was a year old we decided to get another dog and we brought Billy home. They immediately took to each other and played for 3 days straight. It was like one long play date and then they started to settle down. But the playing continued. One day I found Susie barking at the carrier. She never liked the carrier, still doesn’t, but Billy liked it and would go in there to sleep. She was barking so loud for a couple of minutes I went to look in the carrier. I found Billy had stashed all of the toys Susie played with inside the carrier. I think he figured out Susie wouldn’t go in there. Then one afternoon Susie raced into the living room with Billy following after her, she had a toy Billy was playing with in her mouth, she stopped by the sofa and tossed it up there. Billy tried to get up on the sofa, but he was too small to jump up. Hmm…I think she knew that.

What’s the number one item on your bucket list and why?

That’s easy. I want to go Costa Rica to visit the sloth sanctuary. I think they’re so adorable.

 What do your pets do when you are writing?

They sleep while I’m writing. They each have a bed in the study and that’s where they spend most of their days. If the weather is nice and the windows are open, Susie is perched on the back of the sofa with her face practically pressed against the screen.

Debra’s Biography:

Debra Sennefelder is an avid reader who reads across a range of genres, but mystery fiction is her obsession. Her interest in people and relationships is channeled into her novels against a backdrop of crime and mystery. When she’s not reading, she enjoys cooking and baking and as a former food blogger, she is constantly taking photographs of her food. Yeah, she’s that person.

Born and raised in New York City, she now lives and Connecticut with her family. She’s worked in pre-hospital care, retail and publishing. Her writing companions are her adorable and slightly spoiled Shih-Tzus, Susie and Billy.

She is a member of Sisters in Crime and Romance Writers of America. She can be reached at Debra@DebraSennefelder.com

 Let’s Be Social:

Links – Website – http://debrasennefelder.com/

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/DebraSennefelderAuthor/

 

 

Please follow and like us:

Pens, Paws, and Claws Welcomes Kathleen Kaska and Kristina Stanley

Kathleen Kaska

Kristina Stanley

Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Kathleen Kaska and Kristina Stanley as permanent bloggers. Watch for their posts about writing and pets in the upcoming rotation.

Check out Our Authors page to read more about them and our Let’s Be Social page for links to their social media sites.

Please follow and like us:

Teresa Inge Interviews Gwen Taylor about her Volunteer Work at For the Love of Poodles

This week, Pens, Paws, and Claws would like to welcome Gwen Taylor. Teresa Inge interviews her about her volunteer work with For the Love of Poodles.

Tell us about yourself.
My name is Gwen Taylor and I am a plastic surgery nurse and a huge dog lover. I grew up in Hanover County, Virginia. I had a Jack Russell Terrier for nearly 17 years. His name was Emmitt and he was the love of my life.

Are you involved with any animal organizations or do volunteer work?
I am a foster mom and volunteer for the small non-profit name organization, For The Love of Poodles. We are based out of Richmond, Virginia and rescue small dogs.

Ever foster or adopt any pets?
I have fostered 6 dogs.  Recently, I adopted Mickey a 5 year old shih tzu. The sixth adopted dog is Figaro.

What is your funniest pet story?
Just last night I stopped and got a box of KFC chicken after work. When I got home, I put my plate on the coffee table and went to the kitchen for my glass of tea. When I returned, Figaro my #6 foster dog, a 10 pound poodle/shih tzu mix had jumped on the table and had a chicken leg in his mouth. Which by the way looked like a dinosaur leg in his tiny mouth. Mickey was under the table waiting to share in on the delicious food.

Anything else you would like to share?
The loss of a lifetime companion truly broke my heart. But volunteering For The Love of Poodles and being a foster mom is very healing. Please remember, adopt don’t shop for a pet.

For the Love of Poodles – Facebook

Please follow and like us:

Welcome, Andrew Welsh-Huggins!

Tell our readers a little about yourself and your writing. By day I’m a reporter for The Associated Press in Columbus where I cover criminal justice issues, including the death penalty, the opioid epidemic and terrorism prosecutions. By earlier in the day I write the Andy Hayes private series published by Swallow Press (http://www.ohioswallow.com/author/Andrew+Welsh+Huggins), about a disgraced ex-Ohio State quarterback turned investigator in Columbus. The fifth installment, The Third Brother, comes out April 13. I also write short crime fiction.

Tell us about your pets. Are any of them models for pets in your writing? As my website says in tongue-in-cheek fashion, I’m the ‘owner of too many pets.’ We have a mixed breed dog, Mikey, two black cats, and two parakeets.

Tell us about any pets you have in your books/stories. Are any of them recurring characters? What are they and their names? My private eye has a Golden Lab, “Hopalong,” named for Howard “Hopalong” Cassaday, an Ohio State running back who won the Heisman Trophy in 1955. Hopalong has appeared in all five books.

What are you reading now?

I just read, in order, The Late Show by Michael Connelly, The Dry by Jane Harper and All Day And A Night by Alafair Burke.

 What writing projects are you currently working on? My sixth Andy Hayes mystery, Fatal Judgment, coming in April 2019 (once again featuring Hopalong), and various short stories.

Did you have childhood pets? If so, tell us about them.

We always had cats when I was growing up, starting with “Charley,” a gray and white domestic shorthair when I was about five. Our most famous family cat, “Melrose,” once faced down a buck with a full set of antlers in our back yard in western New York State–and won.

Why do you include animals in your writing?

My character, Andy Hayes, is a dog person. I like having Hopalong in his life as something that makes him seem more real. More than one reader has said they appreciate the fact he actually has to remember to come home and let the dog out. Also, although I’ve never owned a lab, I have a good friend who does, and I enjoy researching Hopalong’s activities by seeing what my friend and his dog are up to.

What’s your real-life funniest pet story?

In August 1989, my wife and I were moving from Providence, Rhode Island, to Bloomington, Indiana, with all our belongings, including our cat, Ezra. Someone recommended we put butter on his paws to calm him while we drove. Instead, we ended up a wigged-out cat and butter all over the moving van’s windows as Ezra didn’t take kindly to the idea. Later that day, we stuck him in a duffel bag and tiptoed to our room past a hotel lobby clerk–those were the days before hotels were as pet friendly as they are today. We thought we were very sneaky. Ezra wasn’t amused.

When did you know you were a writer? And how did you know?

I’ve wanted to be a writer more or less when I started reading around age six or so. I knew because I immediately started writing books on whatever paper was around the house.

What do your pets do when you are writing? I work on my fiction from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. each morning. As soon as I sit down, my 14-year-old cat, Frankie, emerges from wherever she’s hanging out in my home office, jumps on the reading chair beside me and demands to sit on my lap. She stays there, snuggled under my bathrobe, the entire time. Mikey the dog and Theo, the other cat, are usually sacked out–separately–upstairs.

What’s in your “To Be Read” (TBR) pile right now? And how many TBR piles do you have? Bedside, I have Going Long, an anthology of journalism about track and field; They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, a popular culture essay collection by Hanif Abdurraqib; and How To Read A Novelist by John Freeman. In my downstairs pile are Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead, The Marsh King’s Daughter by Karen Dionne, and The Metal Shredders by Nancy Zafris (plus many mystery short story anthologies and magazines, including Best American Mystery Stories 2015, the collected Sue Grafton Kinsey Millhone short stories, and copies of Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine and Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine). My third TBR “pile” consists of podcasts, audio short stories and various audio novellas on my phone for the car–most recently including Anne Perry’s annual Christmas novellas.

Author Biography:

Andrew grew up in a small town near the Finger Lakes in western New York State, where one of his favorite Christmas presents as a child was “Thurber on Crime,” thus launching him on a path involving both a love of detective fiction and his future home in Columbus, Ohio. He attended Kenyon College where he majored in Classics and more importantly, met his future wife, Pam, at your standard early 1980s dating hotspot: a Medieval banquet.

Andrew started his writing career as a newspaper reporter in Providence, R.I. and worked later for papers in Bloomington, Indiana, and Youngstown, Ohio. He moved to Columbus in 1998 to work for the Associated Press, covering the death penalty, crime and courts, the Statehouse and long-lived zoo animals.

Andrew is the author of five Andy Hayes mysteries published by Ohio University Press, featuring a disgraced ex-Ohio State quarterback turned private eye, including the upcoming The Third Brother. Andrew has also written two nonfiction books, also published by OU Press: No Winners Here Tonight, a history of Ohio’s death penalty, and Hatred at Home, about one of the country’s first domestic terrorism cases.

Andrew’s short mystery fiction includes “The Murderous Type,” which won the 2017 Al Blanchard prize for best New England short crime fiction, and appears in Snowbound: The Best New England Crime Stories 2017.

When he’s not writing or reporting, Andrew enjoys running, reading, spending time with family and trying to remember why having a dog, two cats and two parakeets seemed like a good idea at the time.

Let’s Be Social:

Website

Twitter

Please follow and like us: